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tikal26
April 27th, 2007, 05:15 PM
I am wondering if people here support coomercial companies that sell products for linux. I was having a converstaion with someon about the fact that many times linux users ask for certain software to be ported to linux, but then they don't go out and buy commercial products for linux. I was also reading about a pieces of software I use and the fact that the companies is committed to releasing their software in linux. I am just wondering how many people actually buy software for their ubuntu and why.

earobinson
April 27th, 2007, 05:20 PM
I dont think you will find many people that buy sw for linux, but I can list many companies!

Hendrixski
April 27th, 2007, 05:23 PM
I dont think you will find many people that buy sw for linux, but I can list many companies!

That may change. We'll have Click 'n Run on ubuntu soon so that you can legally buy the codecs you need for video and mp3 and whatever else. And you can buy MS Office running on Cedega (don't know why you'd want to, but you can).

While the older generation of Linux users won't buy any, the newer one will. Word on the street is that Dell may start putting Ubuntu on store shelves back to back with Windows computers. If that happens, the next generation of Linux users will be very much into buying software for Linux.

earobinson
April 27th, 2007, 05:39 PM
Im with mark on this one

<JLP> QUESTION: Does Ubuntu have any plans to join forces with other Linux distributions, vendors and companies and together put some pressure on software companies and and offer them help so that they would port some of the most popular applications (like Photoshop, AutoCAD, ...) to Linux?

*

We do already meet with ISV's, and encourage them to port to Linux. they always take a business view of the market opportunity. that's a factor of two things. the raw number of users, and the willingness of those users to pay for software. on the raw number, linux is doing very well. so hardware folks are starting to take notice. but on the ISV front, it's more challenging. many folks are on free software in part because they do not have to pay. there are some niche markets where that's not true - mostly places where Linux was a lower-cost (but not free) alternative to UNIX like workstations, graphics, CAD, movie animation and effects etc. but for raw consumers, i think the free software community should assume that we are going to have to build our own leaders in each of the major software categories. because, unless something changes and linux users start to be willing to pay for apps, the ISV's are unlikely to porthttps://wiki.ubuntu.com/MeetingLogs/openweekfeisty/askmark

justin whitaker
April 27th, 2007, 05:44 PM
I buy Crossover Office and Cedega. I think you hit on a good point: everyone yells at companies to port their software or open their code so that it can run on Linunx/BSD, but then they do not support those companies.

h00RU
April 27th, 2007, 05:53 PM
I have no problem purchasing sw for Linux.

I have used Linspire in the past (I am a Linspire Insider) and and have purchased games and other sw in the CNR warehouse.

If the sw provides value or compatibility with proprietary applications that I need for work, I will spend the money to be able to use it.

orange2k
April 27th, 2007, 06:03 PM
I bought Energy XT license that works for windows and linux...
I don`t see any reason not to buy software that I like...

Hendrixski
April 27th, 2007, 06:03 PM
I have no problem purchasing sw for Linux.

I have used Linspire in the past (I am a Linspire Insider) and and have purchased games and other sw in the CNR warehouse.

If the sw provides value or compatibility with proprietary applications that I need for work, I will spend the money to be able to use it.

You are the future of Linux. Well, people like you who will buy software on the linux platform and make companies start wanting to make more software for Linux.

I like the quote from Ubuntu Open Week of Mark Shuttleworth, he was really good. He mentioned that the workstation market may be the big one on this front, and it's not going to be end users like us, it's going to be business users. Hopefully it'll trickle down from there.

reclusivemonkey
April 27th, 2007, 06:04 PM
What sort of applications do you mean? Give an instance where there is a commercial program not offered freely in the repos, or a commercial application that performs better than the repos. I think for most people who's needs are not met in Linux completely, they will either dual boot (Windows), or buy a Mac. Personally I think the video editing / dvd authoring in Linux is not up to the standards of that of a Mac, and won't be for a long time, so I am considering buying a Mac.

I'm not sure of how the reasoning goes that just because someone buys a Dell with Linux on it they are going to want to buy software as well. They will find a whole range of free software at their disposal.

orange2k
April 27th, 2007, 06:15 PM
What sort of applications do you mean? Give an instance where there is a commercial program not offered freely in the repos, or a commercial application that performs better than the repos. I think for most people who's needs are not met in Linux completely, they will either dual boot (Windows), or buy a Mac. Personally I think the video editing / dvd authoring in Linux is not up to the standards of that of a Mac, and won't be for a long time, so I am considering buying a Mac.

I'm not sure of how the reasoning goes that just because someone buys a Dell with Linux on it they are going to want to buy software as well. They will find a whole range of free software at their disposal.

I think the same goes for music sequencing and editing. But since Energy XT2 got released I`m thinking of totally switching to linux dispite the fact that I`ll be missing hundreds of VST plugins available only on the windows platform...

justin whitaker
April 27th, 2007, 06:18 PM
What sort of applications do you mean? Give an instance where there is a commercial program not offered freely in the repos, or a commercial application that performs better than the repos. I think for most people who's needs are not met in Linux completely, they will either dual boot (Windows), or buy a Mac. Personally I think the video editing / dvd authoring in Linux is not up to the standards of that of a Mac, and won't be for a long time, so I am considering buying a Mac.

I'm not sure of how the reasoning goes that just because someone buys a Dell with Linux on it they are going to want to buy software as well. They will find a whole range of free software at their disposal.

Well, for me, Crossover Office is easier than WINE to use, and my World of Warcraft installation does not balk every time Blizzard ships a patch down the pike. So that's a greater value to me then WINE, and for me, it does perform better. I could do the same in WINE with tinkering, but I would rather play the game than futz around to fix WINE.

Same thing with Cedega. I have Guild Wars:Nightfall running on that, and it performs admirably, after a few configuration tweaks.

The question really isn't free/pay, but more what do you want to do, and which tool do you find more useful? For example, I find GIMP to be perfectly fine for my use...but Photoshop is industry standard, and is an amazing piece of software. If I was a pro designer, I would probably buy Photoshop for Linux.

I use Dreamweaver at work to maintain an intranet site....if Adobe releases a Linux version, even a nice looking WINE port, I would seriously think about buying it instead of using Bluefish.

On the other hand, I also donate to Elive, PCLinuxOS, LinuxTracker, and a bunch of other projects because I want to help them, and I am not a developer. Money helps too.

I guess that makes me a Linux Pragmatist, rather than a FOSS acolyte.

h00RU
April 27th, 2007, 06:40 PM
You are the future of Linux. Well, people like you who will buy software on the linux platform and make companies start wanting to make more software for Linux.

I like the quote from Ubuntu Open Week of Mark Shuttleworth, he was really good. He mentioned that the workstation market may be the big one on this front, and it's not going to be end users like us, it's going to be business users. Hopefully it'll trickle down from there.

I would like to think that the major ISVs are now aware that the Linux market is ripe for new opportunities and will begin porting their applications over. There are several vertical markets, that if they get there first, could be quite a boon for their business.

I have been a Linux user and administrator for over 10 years now and would like to see some progress by the major players in the sw industry. They have to understand that there are MILLIONS of us in the world that are serious about Linux and are willing to purchase applications. I do find a l lot of the apps I need in the repos only because some one took the time to create an app that does the same thing as a commercially available product. Most of them are quite good, but it does take time to refine and debug.

tikal26
April 27th, 2007, 06:47 PM
[QUOTE=reclusivemonkey;2547179]What sort of applications do you mean? QUOTE]

First I am talking about things that make linux legal like codecs dvd playing software, etc.

Second I am talking about things like image editors, music composer, things that currently don;t exist in Linux .

Lastly, I currently buy things like REalflow and Maxwell render from next limit so I was wondering if others were willing to buy software for their Ubuntu.

orange2k
April 27th, 2007, 06:49 PM
[QUOTE=reclusivemonkey;2547179]What sort of applications do you mean? QUOTE]

First I am talking about things that make linux legal like codecs dvd playing software, etc.

Second I am talking about things like image editors, music composer, things that currently don;t exist in Linux .

Lastly, I currently buy things like REalflow and Maxwell render from next limit so I was wondering if others were willing to buy software for their Ubuntu.

Music composer exists now in linux: energy xt2. Look it up: www.energy-xt.com

reclusivemonkey
April 27th, 2007, 06:50 PM
Well, for me, Crossover Office is easier than WINE to use, and my World of Warcraft installation does not balk every time Blizzard ships a patch down the pike. So that's a greater value to me then WINE, and for me, it does perform better. I could do the same in WINE with tinkering, but I would rather play the game than futz around to fix WINE.

Same thing with Cedega. I have Guild Wars:Nightfall running on that, and it performs admirably, after a few configuration tweaks.

Why not just dual boot? This is what I do for gaming. Not to mention that depsite paying for Cedega, it doesn't support Sims 2 and never does (my gf and daughter play this a lot).


The question really isn't free/pay, but more what do you want to do, and which tool do you find more useful? For example, I find GIMP to be perfectly fine for my use...but Photoshop is industry standard, and is an amazing piece of software. If I was a pro designer, I would probably buy Photoshop for Linux.

My friend is a professional artist; http://www.parishair.com

He uses Macs exclusively. He can afford them, and all the software because he gets paid a lot because of his talent. Any professional who needs good tools should be earning enough to pay for them. I think most of the people who moan about Photoshop not being available on Linux aren't paying for it on Windows, and use 1% of its functionality, but that's just my personal opinion.


I use Dreamweaver at work to maintain an intranet site....if Adobe releases a Linux version, even a nice looking WINE port, I would seriously think about buying it instead of using Bluefish.

No offence, but I would never dream of using a WYSIWYG HTML editor. I think that learning the code is much more worthwhile. The learning curve may be a little steep, but learning itself is a good thing. I don't think you learn much using Dreamweaver. Aren't most intranet sites going the way of CMS?


On the other hand, I also donate to Elive, PCLinuxOS, LinuxTracker, and a bunch of other projects because I want to help them, and I am not a developer. Money helps too.

I guess that makes me a Linux Pragmatist, rather than a FOSS acolyte.

Bravo to you. As long as a commercial solutions provider keeps the source open, I don't think anyone has an issue.

aysiu
April 27th, 2007, 06:50 PM
I support porting of commercial apps in theory but not personally, since I don't need any.

I'd like Adobe CS3 to have a Linux version so that those who depend on CS3 for their livelihood can use Linux, but I don't use Adobe CS3 or need it, so, no, I wouldn't pay money for it. GIMP, Scribus, and Inkscape suit my needs just fine.

orange2k
April 27th, 2007, 06:55 PM
I support porting of commercial apps in theory but not personally, since I don't need any.

I'd like Adobe CS3 to have a Linux version so that those who depend on CS3 for their livelihood can use Linux, but I don't use Adobe CS3 or need it, so, no, I wouldn't pay money for it. GIMP, Scribus, and Inkscape suit my needs just fine.



Why do you say "in theory"? There are commercial apps available right now so it`s not just a theory to support them or not...

NeroLinux, EnergyXT2 just to name two...

aysiu
April 27th, 2007, 07:00 PM
My support for commercial applications is in theory.

Commercial applications' existence isn't in theory.

reclusivemonkey
April 27th, 2007, 07:02 PM
NeroLinux, EnergyXT2 just to name two...

I would *love* to see the sales figures for NeroLinux...

Zuph
April 27th, 2007, 07:03 PM
Why do you say "in theory"?

The idea of them. Some people think the idea of selling a piece of software is reprehensible.

orange2k
April 27th, 2007, 07:03 PM
Ah, okay then...

justin whitaker
April 27th, 2007, 07:09 PM
Why not just dual boot? This is what I do for gaming. Not to mention that depsite paying for Cedega, it doesn't support Sims 2 and never does (my gf and daughter play this a lot).

Good question!

I guess it comes down to the POV that if everyone that games on a PC just uses Windows, then Gaming on Linux will never get anywhere.

So I buy a game, play around with WINE/Crossover/Cedega to see if it will run, submit bugs when I know what is going on, and generally try to help advance the cause. Yes, it's a headache. Yes, it's not perfect. I still think that Linux is a great gaming platform, particularly when I get better latency and frame rates than on Windows with the games I do get running.

As for Dreamweaver: I work for a non-tech boss. Just the idea of a text mode design scares the crap out of him, because he doesn't understand any of it. So something where you can tweak the code and show him without opening a browser is what he wants. And we are a fortune 1000 company and can pay the license.

At home, I do find myself missing some features of Dreamweaver...

reclusivemonkey
April 27th, 2007, 08:00 PM
Good question!

I guess it comes down to the POV that if everyone that games on a PC just uses Windows, then Gaming on Linux will never get anywhere.

So I buy a game, play around with WINE/Crossover/Cedega to see if it will run, submit bugs when I know what is going on, and generally try to help advance the cause. Yes, it's a headache. Yes, it's not perfect. I still think that Linux is a great gaming platform, particularly when I get better latency and frame rates than on Windows with the games I do get running.

I'm almost giving up the ghost on PC gaming. We all (gf, daughter, myself) have DSes, and we also have a Wii. Once the Sims come out on Wii, I might just scrap the XP install. The gaming industry is *huge*, and no matter how small the numbers on Linux are, there has to be a healthy profit margin for the effort of porting. I think the trouble is that my machine is just a bit too old. I got Quake 4 just because it would play on Linux, but the performance was awful.

mech7
April 28th, 2007, 09:56 AM
As for Dreamweaver: I work for a non-tech boss. Just the idea of a text mode design scares the crap out of him, because he doesn't understand any of it. So something where you can tweak the code and show him without opening a browser is what he wants. And we are a fortune 1000 company and can pay the license.

At home, I do find myself missing some features of Dreamweaver...


Scary text mode in dreamweaver.. it seems to run pretty well :)

http://img357.imageshack.us/img357/4774/screenshot1sj6.th.png (http://img357.imageshack.us/my.php?image=screenshot1sj6.png)


Anyway i don't mind paying for software that is good and works.. programmers have to eat somehow :confused: What I do mind is paying for buggy software that looks great but does not work (Pixel)

God i wish WINE supported Photoshop properly :(

Erik Trybom
April 28th, 2007, 10:33 AM
I run Matlab and Comsol Multiphysics in Ubuntu. I didn't pay more than a few dollars since they are student licenses, but I did pay for them.

On the other hand, I rarely pay for anything at all when it comes to software. Browsers can be had for free, mail clients are free of charge. Latex doesn't cost anything, and neither does my IM client or audio player. I simply don't often use applications that cost money.