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daynah
April 10th, 2007, 01:56 PM
Do any of you (you maybe only being those who have fully switched) feel like you've lost some of your Windows-savvy?

I used to be a school secretary's assistant, and my bosses' printer flipped out, and I needed to reinstall the drivers. After searching the internet, all the fake sites, the ads, the mac version of the driver (omg so close!), I honestly wanted to cry. My boss walks over and asks me what's taking so long, why haven't I gotten the papers printed.

"There's just no apt-get."

Another time, while at work and installing a bluetooth headset for skype, I was trying to find the Hardware Manager. Easy enough, there are much harder things about bluetooth in skype. But I couldn't find the hardware manager. My friend, in all his "I am geekier than thou" stance does the "clickclickitymagicpoof" and there it is.

"I know where it is in Ubuntu..."

For me at least, I feel like it truely fits the "use it or lose it" clique. I no longer feel capable of fixing other people's computers. Windows I've forgotten, and, though I've been using Ubuntu for over a year and a half now, I don't know enough to say, "Just come to me, and I can help you."

Does anyone else feel like this?

lyceum
April 10th, 2007, 02:11 PM
I have had that happen. I still use XP at work and I have Vista on my laptop for school, but XP is locked down so I really jsut use word and I do not use Vista that offten, as it is a pain. When someone wants me to fix their Windows box I have to take a minute to remember that things do not "just work". If plug and play does not pick it up, I have to remember what to do. It is not longer instict or second nature.

M$LOL
April 10th, 2007, 02:17 PM
Yeah, I find that a bit, but I'm so far ahead of all the people I have to work with or do things for regarding Windows that it really makes no difference. My Linux knowledge more than makes up for whatever Windows stuff I've forgotten a hundred-fold anyway.

EdThaSlayer
April 10th, 2007, 02:24 PM
I lost quite a bit of my Windows knowledge, but what did I gain? A TON of Linux knowledge. :)

PapaWiskas
April 10th, 2007, 02:25 PM
I know exactly how you feel.
I made the switch for full personal use December 2005, I still have to interact with various Windows OSes at work though.

I find myself not really wanting to help my friends after I get off work. They call me with their problems and I am like I don't know...I can give you this Live disc, it has Linux, I have been running it since 2005 and I havent had to worry about things breaking or not working. And they are like 'Really?" I have got a few of them to at least dual boot, and one of the least likely people I thought would even try it, loved it so much she completely switched over and joined the Kubuntu forums, she loves her Kubuntu. And all her brothers switched over too.

I used to spend hours, helping friends over the phone. Now....I get maybe one call every few months and the conversations last about 10 minutes or so, I convince them to take it somewhere to have it fixed. I just dont want to be bothered, I deal with enough Windows issues at work.

anaconda
April 10th, 2007, 02:32 PM
Yep.. same here.
I still remember how things are done in windows, but it takes a few minutes, and it feels that everything is so much simpler and faster in ubuntu.

FoolsGold
April 10th, 2007, 02:37 PM
To an extent, though I suppose that unless you cut yourself off from using ANY Windows boxes (particularly those at work/school), you'll still have basic skills you can transfer between platforms.

If someone asks you to fix their messed-up Windows system though, you can avoid looking stupid by simply saying "I don't do Windows" as opposed to saying "I don't know how to fix Windows."

jeffc313
April 10th, 2007, 03:51 PM
yeah, unless the stuff works ootb, I find myself having to rack my brain in order to remember. I switched to Linux when I was just a wee little 13 year old wanna-be hacker.

picpak
April 10th, 2007, 04:04 PM
Imagine me and my mom, both who have gotten used to Linux, try to set up Windows XP. :lolflag: We were completely lost!

I actually have a lot of my bash aliases to be DOS-like (del, edit) so it'll be easier on Windows.

bastiegast
April 10th, 2007, 04:22 PM
Do any of you (you maybe only being those who have fully switched) feel like you've lost some of your Windows-savvy?

I used to be a school secretary's assistant, and my bosses' printer flipped out, and I needed to reinstall the drivers. After searching the internet, all the fake sites, the ads, the mac version of the driver (omg so close!), I honestly wanted to cry. My boss walks over and asks me what's taking so long, why haven't I gotten the papers printed.

"There's just no apt-get."

Another time, while at work and installing a bluetooth headset for skype, I was trying to find the Hardware Manager. Easy enough, there are much harder things about bluetooth in skype. But I couldn't find the hardware manager. My friend, in all his "I am geekier than thou" stance does the "clickclickitymagicpoof" and there it is.

"I know where it is in Ubuntu..."

For me at least, I feel like it truely fits the "use it or lose it" clique. I no longer feel capable of fixing other people's computers. Windows I've forgotten, and, though I've been using Ubuntu for over a year and a half now, I don't know enough to say, "Just come to me, and I can help you."

Does anyone else feel like this?

Sounds very familiar. On the other hand linux has made me understand lots more about computers in general, knowledge and pure logic that often is useful in windows too.

wrycatcher
April 10th, 2007, 04:24 PM
I do a fair amount of consulting, and mostly for very non-technical Windows users (is that a redundant statement?). :-k When it makes sense for a particular user (not all users are ready for Linux...), I will recommend Linux. Ubuntu is a natural choice as it is very newb-friendly for OOTB functionality. I might even setup a dual boot on their machine so they can try it out without having to sacrifice their Windows. Why not recommend they use a LiveCD, you ask? To be honest, having them insert a CD for reboot is actually something they would prefer to not do...just one more thing to remember. The GRUB menu is actually less trouble for them.

TravisNewman
April 10th, 2007, 04:27 PM
I'm a sysadmin on a Windows network, so fortunately I haven't lost anything :) For a while I felt like I was until I started this job.

finferflu
April 10th, 2007, 04:29 PM
I actually reset myself by instinct. I hated Windows so much, that when I finally removed it from my HD for good, my brain said: "Windows who?"
I have not much Windows knowledge left, and it seems like I don't want to have it. It may sound selfish/stupid, but I really don't want to have anything to do with that OS and that company anymore.

Dragonbite
April 10th, 2007, 04:52 PM
Sounds very familiar. On the other hand linux has made me understand lots more about computers in general, knowledge and pure logic that often is useful in windows too.So true. Most of what I "troubleshoot" I'm using general logic, not windows-specific.

What I dislike is trying to look around for advice. Ubuntu Forums is so much easier for troubleshooting. If that doesn't work, I look at Gentoo's Forums (http://forums.gentoo.org/), LinuxQuestions (http://www.linuxquestions.org/) and just plain 'ol Google (somebody's probably solved it on their blog or something)

Microsoft's resolution are always is so over-the-top (you have to re-install xyz and Windows components abc and modify the bios ... ).

Every time I find a solution outside of Microsoft's site, I find it is an easy configuration change, or modification of a shortcut line (like adding a parameter).

wrycatcher
April 10th, 2007, 05:04 PM
I'm a sysadmin on a Windows network, so fortunately I haven't lost anything :) For a while I felt like I was until I started this job.

Yeah, you definitely won't lose your Windows savvy now. I also work within Windows for my profession (though not in the admin/IT capacity). However, I do some personal consulting on the side and so I use more of my Windows savvy for admin tasks, just simple home computing stuff (security/setup/spyware/optimization/sysconfig), nothing that complex.

What I find though, is that sometimes I feel like a physician who is benefiting from a curable condition, like I'm violating some Hippocratic oath of consulting. Of course, the "patient" isn't always open to trying new treatment (Linux), despite the likelihood that they might finally "get better". #-o

warp99
April 10th, 2007, 05:10 PM
I've lost most of my Windows knowledge on how to troubleshoot. I do have a vmware image of XP for Quicken, but it's because I can't export the .qif files into GnuCash because Quicken keeps crashing when I try.

:lolflag:

It nice because when someone asks me to fix there Windows install I just shrug my shoulders and say I forgot how to do all that stuff. I have absolutely no knowledge of how to troubleshoot Vista since I just used it for a few minutes at the local Beast Buy. :)

Lord Illidan
April 10th, 2007, 05:11 PM
I felt like it when I tried out vista on my dad's new vaio...couldn't get a thing working..then I downloaded firefox and a slew of OSS apps and felt better. Then I wiped it and installed Ubuntu and we're talking mate.

Compiled alsa the next day, it is quite easy to do so...and everything works :)

PartisanEntity
April 10th, 2007, 05:49 PM
The other day I forgot where to find the power management options in XP. However I use Windows at work and I still have an XP installation which I use for WIndows-only applications and that helps to stay 'fresh'.

mips
April 10th, 2007, 06:48 PM
I have not really lost anything. Occasionally it takes me a bit longer to find something in windows though when I have to change settings or something.

BrokeBody
April 10th, 2007, 06:59 PM
Relax guys. There's nothing to lose when it comes to Windows.

:mrgreen:

Dragonbite
April 10th, 2007, 07:02 PM
That would be the worst case of Alzheimers (not to belittle this nasty, debilitating disease) ...

you forget everything EXCEPT how to run Windows!!

daynah
April 10th, 2007, 07:20 PM
Relax guys. There's nothing to lose when it comes to Windows.

:mrgreen:

There's my street cred for being an awesome computer user. If I can't prove it on their comps and all they got is Windows...

Man, more people need Ubuntu. I'm just gonna grab people's laptops and dual boot Ubuntu.

Erik Trybom
April 10th, 2007, 08:01 PM
I've never been a Windows XP power user. The computer I have now used to run Windows 2000 before I loaded Ubuntu onto it. It wasn't until quite recently that I actually installed Windows XP, and I hardly ever use it.

Not that I'm an expert Linux user either, but at least I know where to find people who are.

aysiu
April 10th, 2007, 08:26 PM
I would, except that I have to use Windows for work.

prizrak
April 10th, 2007, 08:58 PM
I don't seem to have lost anything, but I did get confused today at work when I was trying to set a different wallpaper. Somehow it seemed that "Customize Desktop" was the logical choice to add wallpapers not "Browse". Mind you I been using Windows since '97.

macogw
April 11th, 2007, 07:19 AM
I remember where most stuff I've had to mess with is because I work at a computer repair shop, but one time after updating a video driver (windows update did it) it took 2 days for me to find out how to roll it back to one that worked. The usual spyware/adware/antivirus stuff I can do just fine, but troubleshooting network connections is a PITA. That little wizard is horrible!

BoyOfDestiny
April 11th, 2007, 09:09 AM
To an extent, though I suppose that unless you cut yourself off from using ANY Windows boxes (particularly those at work/school), you'll still have basic skills you can transfer between platforms.

If someone asks you to fix their messed-up Windows system though, you can avoid looking stupid by simply saying "I don't do Windows" as opposed to saying "I don't know how to fix Windows."

Yeah, definitely feeling that.
If it helps you can give the same advice as always... I'm sure everyone dealing with Windows and helping someone has said one of the following.

1. ctrl + alt + delete
2. Did you reboot?
3. reformat and reinstall
4. defragment your drive
5. reinstall the application
6. Use firefox
7. Do you have a firewall and/or anti-virus running
8. Did you scan for spyware
Bonus:
9. I use Linux so...(and try as hard as you can to not to be overly condescending)

beefcurry
April 11th, 2007, 11:07 AM
I lost quite a bit of my Windows knowledge, but what did I gain? A TON of Linux knowledge. :)

best to describe what i feel.

Dragonbite
April 11th, 2007, 01:35 PM
Windows is easy troubleshooting, they follow the 4 "R"s


Restart the Program
Reboot the Computer
Reinstall the Program
Reinstall Windows
(and the preferable option)
Remove Windows and use Linux Instead!

bomanizer
April 11th, 2007, 01:47 PM
Yup, it's nice to be able to be honest. Sometimes earlier I'd say to a friend asking help on Win that "I dont' know, go ask X". Now I can say it and mean it :D

wrycatcher
April 11th, 2007, 05:20 PM
LOL - "My wizard is an idiot."

Sunnz
April 11th, 2007, 07:31 PM
Windows is easy troubleshooting, they follow the 4 "R"s


Restart the Program
Reboot the Computer
Reinstall the Program
Reinstall Windows
(and the preferable option)
Remove Windows and use Linux Instead!

Or...

The problem lies between the user and the hardware.

Dragonbite
April 11th, 2007, 08:48 PM
Or...

The problem lies between the user and the hardware.You mean P.E.B.K.A.C.?

Problem
Exists
Between
Keyboard
And
Chair

Sunnz
April 11th, 2007, 08:49 PM
Lol, but that's the user, not Windows!!