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Hortinstein
April 3rd, 2007, 06:02 AM
I always hear about people missing stuff that they could do in windows, and I was just curious what you like doing in Linux you couldn't do in windows...

to get the ball rolling I like the control I have with terminal commands like sed/grep/awk for use with programming and shell scripting.

BOBSONATOR
April 3rd, 2007, 06:05 AM
beryl, woot first post

aysiu
April 3rd, 2007, 06:06 AM
Don't those terminal commands (sed, awk) work in Mac OS X?

These are the cool things I can do:
1. Upgrade to the newest version legally and without paying money
2. Have the latest version of the OS run faster than the previous version on the same hardware
3. Easily install and run different graphical interfaces (I tried LiteStep and all the other Windows options--not easy--sorry, Windows enthusiasts)
4. Install twenty programs with one command
5. Have the system automatically update all my installed programs for me.
6. Install the same copy of Ubuntu on multiple computers without worrying about license restrictions or activation keys

beefcurry
April 3rd, 2007, 06:20 AM
I have to second Aysiu

Hortinstein
April 3rd, 2007, 06:31 AM
dam...i cant beleive beryl wasnt the first i posted either....and now that I think about it your right, you probably can use those for mac, but linux was first.

sweemeng
April 3rd, 2007, 07:27 AM
how about hardware virtualization? don't think windows have that.

igknighted
April 3rd, 2007, 07:44 AM
I'm gonna go a little more low-key...

1) Highlight to copy & middle click to paste ... any time I touch a windows computer I do this out of habit

2) Alt+click to drag windows

3) Infinitely customize the looks... without paying for a 3rd party app like window blinds

4) Virtual Desktops (ok, Mac just added this... weve had it forever)

and lots more little touches like this. The linux GUI is just so much more user friendly. My g/f (not a computer power user by any stretch, but spends a lot of time on it none the less) used linux for a matter of days and fell in love with how user-friendly the gui was. If only our school's music subscription service worked under linux she'd be primarily a linux user... but thats another story.

koshatnik
April 3rd, 2007, 09:02 AM
I always hear about people missing stuff that they could do in windows, and I was just curious what you like doing in Linux you couldn't do in windows...


Run a viable operating system that doesn't corrupt my files, crash constantly and fall victim to a virus every 30 seconds.

karellen
April 3rd, 2007, 09:16 AM
update the entire os with a single command
install a lot of applications with a single command
not being dependent of the gui
have multiple desktop environments
be free of viruses/spyware/malware and so on
be free :)

cunawarit
April 3rd, 2007, 09:38 AM
By far, THE coolest BEST thing that you can do in a Linux box and not (easily) on Windows or Mac is to have a machine that is only running software that has gone thru comprehensive testing to make sure it all works with each other well.

In terms of stability, security, usability, it is all much of a muchness... With only relatively small variations.

avc302000
April 3rd, 2007, 12:18 PM
And what about being able to install/uninstall everything, even if it comes embedded in the system.

For me, thats probably the best reason... the advanced customization of everything.

GeneralZod
April 3rd, 2007, 12:52 PM
Fix bugs, add/ change features beyond the capabilities offered by the original writers.

ubukool
April 3rd, 2007, 01:12 PM
What I love about Ubuntu is that, as soon as I log on, I have an update manager that tells me about updates to all packages, which then, upon downloading and updating gives me better functionality and exciting new features at no additional cost on an INTEGRATED OS - not just security updates for an OS that has more security holes than swiss cheese:)

(I think you know what I'm referring to....)

3rdalbum
April 3rd, 2007, 01:14 PM
Use it legally for free!

Recompile the system for speed.

Update the system software without having to restart.

Edit plain text files to change all sorts of options in your system that Windows or OS X would never let you look at.

Run without a GUI.

See what programs and libraries are installed, and see exactly which ones have updates.

bigken
April 3rd, 2007, 01:25 PM
give my 7 year old total freedom on her pc with no worrys about virus adaware ect and if she does break the os its no big deal to do a install as she has a seperate home partition :)

prizrak
April 3rd, 2007, 01:46 PM
Recompile the entire OS including most of the programs on it out of boredom.

kazuya
April 3rd, 2007, 02:35 PM
1.open downloaded files with less fear of compromise to my system.
2.Updates actually make my system run faster and improve on my app functionalities and performance
3.Ease of having virtual desktops to prevent clutter with minimal hardware resources (128MB)
4.Try out softwares, uninstall them and they are totally uninstalled from my system.
5.Way more customization options over my PC setup, configuration and software apps.
6.Allows for ease of dual-booting other operating systems and distros
7.Installation time for most is only 15 to 20 minutes - fastest
8.My favorite thing is the existence of e17 and beryl, kde, xfce, fluxbox, gnome, icewm, e16 - no other OS makes having these things so easy to have and change at a whim.
9.Price is zero, except for the cost of burning your own CD or ordering through Shipit{Free}

mrmonday
April 3rd, 2007, 03:20 PM
Customise my PC, completely destroy it, click a few buttons and be back to where I started:) Also all of the above.

koenn
April 3rd, 2007, 03:28 PM
beig able to change the system configuration with nothing but a text editor, and not having to reboot to make the changes effective.
shell script languages that actually have decent control structures.
(almost) all software I ever needed readily available

OK, OSX probably has that too, and it 's maybe a it 'old school", but those are the things that I like most about linux.

About Ubuntu : that I can have a fully functional system after a 35 minutes initial setup. I really like the neat, clean approach of everything you need on 1 CD. Choice matters, but in a distro with loads of alternatives, I would still have choosen OpenOffice, Firefox, Gimp, etc so it's nice Ubuntu has done that for me. I only need to add Thunderbird, my mail client of choice.

Chilli Bob
April 3rd, 2007, 03:52 PM
Fit an entire OS, GUI, GIMP, and Office Suite onto a single CD which I can give away to someone else after I've installed it. (Still have to download Nvu though, if that was on the Live CD - sweeeet)

sparky64
April 3rd, 2007, 04:31 PM
Switch it on and be able to start work almost immediately.
installation of updates and progs without constant reboots.
Multiple desktops.
Being able to split windows (especially when converting to mp3's)
Not wasting so much time on virus/spyware scans.
Some of the beryl features.

Mateo
April 3rd, 2007, 04:48 PM
it's a lot of little things, actually. i agree that making scripts is much easier than in windows (even though i know a tiny tiny bit about scripting, i'm still able to automate a lot of stuff I do).

i also like that the gnome clock integrates with Evolution, and it shows a calendar when you click on it. I like that I can have the Trash applet on the panel. I like the "minimize all" applet.

I like that i can have stuff going on in the background terminal (like downloading) without it taking up any room on the gui where we do most of our computer use.

i like not having to worry about programs when I get them. you don't realize how different windows applications are from each other until you use linux and have applications that all look the same, which is nice.

airtonix
April 5th, 2007, 01:03 PM
yeah the coolest thing is that you can interact witha community of people from all around the world. without paranoia that they might be a terrorist or someone trying to sell you nigerian bank bonds.

you can exist in the knowledge that since it is created, maintained and promoted by as a free piece of software...it wont be spending 80% of its time and energy towards creating the next most impossible blistMistaSoftActivationAntiPirateCitizenPrivacyIn vasions systems whose primary focus it check each and every second since purchase and activation time wether or not you were the same person that was there but only 1000 milliseconds ago...

so in the end, the coolest thing about linux is the lack of restrictive patents that reduce the effectiveness that a biologically/culturally/ethinically diverse group of peoples drive to discover ways in which different groups of people can use a computer....

oh yeah and symlinks......you cant make proper symlinks on windows...

cunawarit
April 5th, 2007, 02:14 PM
3) kill -9 (thats a real power)

Yes you can in Windows. And I would imagine Mac OS X too, for Windows, just do:

taskkill [id] /f

And to see the list of running process either, tasklist in the old cmd.exe, or ps on PowerShell.

M$LOL
April 5th, 2007, 02:41 PM
Do everything faster and better than in Windows without seeing twenty blue screens because M$ doesn't like you copying more than four files at a time.

Kobalt
April 5th, 2007, 03:10 PM
bash commands :D

Interestedinthepenguin
April 6th, 2007, 09:49 PM
Open/edit files that are in the trash, without having to restore them first.

Tweak anything.

vf514
April 6th, 2007, 10:11 PM
First, some things I disagree with:


bash commands



to get the ball rolling I like the control I have with terminal commands like sed/grep/awk for use with programming and shell scripting.


Cygwin.



Run a viable operating system that doesn't corrupt my files, crash constantly and fall victim to a virus every 30 seconds.


I have used Windows for years and I have yet to see that happen. All you need is antivirus software (I don't even know if that's necessary...I never get anything except false alarms) and Firefox


Do everything faster and better than in Windows without seeing twenty blue screens because M$ doesn't like you copying more than four files at a time.

M$LOL, I believe the minimum age requirement to post on the Ubuntu Forums is 13

My favorite thing that I can do in Ubuntu that I can't do in Windows is use Beryl.

reacocard
April 6th, 2007, 10:30 PM
The terminal. Yes it's in OSX as well, but it's much better integrated in Linux. You can do pretty much anything from a terminal, and often do it faster than with the GUI. Shell scripts rock.

Beryl. Eye-candy at least as good as Aero, with a tiny fraction of the system requirements (I get ~60fps on an intel 915GM. Take that, MS!)

Make a difference. It's so much easier to get involved in Linux. Helping others in the forums, packaging software, writing software, everything is just so much more transparent than in other OS's.

Customize anything. Every single bit of the OS down to and including the kernel itself can be customized. Now that's power. After more than a year of constant tweaking I'm still finding more things to do.

dada1958
April 6th, 2007, 10:41 PM
Enjoy freedom. I can build my own system. I can run a wonderful OS on it, with a new release every six months. Think really different :)

fuscia
April 6th, 2007, 10:49 PM
as far as i know, one can't use openbox on either? LOL!1 at both of them!

Happy_Man
April 6th, 2007, 10:55 PM
Beryl. Hands down, without a doubt, guaranteed, Beryl. And being able to middle-click to paste. I feel almost naked without it, having to do ctrl-c, ctrl-v just to copy text. Disgusting, barbaric practice. Good thing Ubuntu doesn't condone it.

r3m0t
April 6th, 2007, 10:57 PM
1) Package management (safe, easy, doesn't waste space with the same version of libraries loaded more than once)
2) No licensing issues
3) Make a Wikipedia dump for an mp3 player. Seriously. You need to download the archive, bunzip2 it (on Windows, sidetrack to get 7-zip), parse the XML file or find some other Perl script to put each article in a text file, put them in subdirectories according to the first letter (then first two letters, etc), delete all of the ones that are less than 2KB, and strip each one of some of its formatting. On Linux it's a pleasure - every tool I need is at my fingertips, I just need to learn how to use them. On Windows, each step would be another hunt, another freeware or shareware download (Mass Renamers, etc) and another pain in the ***. (I guess OS X has most of the GNU utils too...)

BLTicklemonster
April 6th, 2007, 11:05 PM
I can run a bleeding edge operating system that I own, that updates itself automatically. and forces me to find new and interesting ways to get X to work every time it does a kernel update.

No wait... I mean...

Never mind. It's worth it.

(of course that's my fault for running Feisty, if I were running Dapper, I'd have just quoted Aysiu's post)

:)

futz
April 7th, 2007, 02:23 AM
I can be working in one window and without refocusing to a background window I can scroll background windows (this is so awesome - windows used to work like this long ago, but they killed it for some reason). Nice time saver.

I can change music volume in a background player without refocusing, as long as I can see part of the player.

I can scroll one pane in Nautilus while the other is focused. Can't do that in Explorer. Makes it so much easier to use quickly.

Lots of little usability things like that. After a while using Linux, going back to windows feels klunky and awkward. Linux isn't perfect (yet), but I like it.

EDIT: And Beryl is cool.

Compucore
April 7th, 2007, 03:41 AM
What I like about Linux or Ubuntu Linux that are the following.

1. It will work almost on any given computer. Intel, AMD or Mac machine depending on what hardware your using at the time. In 32 bit and 64 bit. (I think as well with certain SUN systems too if memory serves me correctly too.

2. You don't have to worry about linceses for the software that is installed by default.And the repositories are great for other related software that you can find or might want to add depending on your needs. Which are free via downloading.

3. When you update your ubuntu box. It will udate the specific kinds of software that you have on that machine. Whether it be something for the OS, or other applications that you are running on your system.

4. if you have a system using a single or more than one processor on board the system is easily workable to do Symetric multi proccessing. Including the hyper threading or equivilant to that from AMD. (Some processors have two or four processors cores on the same chip now or coming out soon.)

5. It just works point final as they say in quebec french over here.

For me personally whether I use Ubuntu, windows, Irix, Sun solaris 10 for example. They just need to work straight from the start. The unix and linux versions are doing far better I find once you know what you are doing with them and they are very stable that it will not crash on you like windows does on the ccasion if there was a memory leak or a driver went bad on you which caused the whole system to go buggy on you.

Fine you get newer stable version that do the same for the earier ones with more related software added in the repositories.

COmpucore

Skia_42
April 7th, 2007, 06:33 AM
Play $10 windows games. Mac gamers need to spend $40 and up for decent games. Plus general linux coolness mentioned in previous posts.

pirothezero
April 7th, 2007, 06:47 AM
Yes you can in Windows. And I would imagine Mac OS X too, for Windows, just do:

taskkill [id] /f

And to see the list of running process either, tasklist in the old cmd.exe, or ps on PowerShell.

Though i have to say that in windows how many times do you go and end a a process and you are sitting there for 5 minutes for it to pop up the send to microsoft bs.

linux it just kills it the moment you hit enter, the way its suppose to work.

rai4shu2
April 7th, 2007, 06:58 AM
The coolest thing you can do with Linux that you can't do with Mac or Windows is make a derivative distro (legally).

igknighted
April 7th, 2007, 07:01 AM
Though i have to say that in windows how many times do you go and end a a process and you are sitting there for 5 minutes for it to pop up the send to microsoft bs.

linux it just kills it the moment you hit enter, the way its suppose to work.

Well, thats more because linux doesn't let one crashing application bring the rest down with it... kinda nice

WalmartSniperLX
April 7th, 2007, 07:38 AM
I can customize EVERYTHING, legally. Not one thing (minus any proprietary installs) cannot be tampered with to my own liking. Also its blazing fast. I can get eyecandy more impressive than Vista's with lower hardware. Now thats friggin pwnage :D

Not to mention I can go anywhere on the internet that may be considered dangerous on windows.

And the ONLY thing that has ever caused my whole system to hang (only happened once or twice) was Wine and some programs that arent too compatible with it. But thats no big deal, and this was a long time ago on a much older release

Mr. Picklesworth
April 7th, 2007, 08:20 AM
Not having to care in the slightest about driver / software updates.

Configurable menu accelerators. GTK is amazing!

I like that I can change the default fonts used by GTK. Lots of Windows users follow a myth that smaller screen resolution = more readable text for old people. This is a ridiculous belief because a smaller resolution on an LCD monitor (which has a strict native resolution) only makes things worse: Text is then blurry, jagged and just plain ugly to the point of being very difficult to read. It is big enough, but it becomes unreadable in a new way that balances out what was improved.
Unfortunately, in my research for a rant on the topic, I found that Windows seems to be quite lacking in terms of properly configuring the default font sizes. (You can change window title font size, button font size and menu font size... but not that of the actual contents, rendering it useless!). Thus, the poor deprived users who follow this myth actually can't do any better; they are given no choice.
Gnome, thanks to its fantastic accessibility options, does give that choice. Finally people with old eyes can read text on their computer screen that does not look like garbage. (There's also that wonderful break time feature in the keyboard preferences, which is quite good).

I haven't seen the same wonderful dead programs handling as you guys have, but then again I have a horrible old computer that's using a page file before it is even fully booted.
I like being able to hit Ctrl+Alt+Backspace to restart X, putting me back into the logon prompt. It is nearly equivalent to restarting the computer in most cases.


Alt+click to drag windowsHey, that reminds me! Has anyone else been confused by Windows' Move option in the window right click menus? I click it and it changes my mouse pointer, but absolutely nothing changes; I still have to click on the title bar to move the window. It is a waste of menu space and time! The weirdest part is how that feature has existed in Windows forever. What the heck were / are they thinking? Does nobody notice this completely irrelevant item taking up one of the major menus?
Confuses me greatly. I like Alt-Click, too :)

r3m0t
April 7th, 2007, 11:07 AM
I've noticed this for several people, but they just shrug. I don't think they can really see the fuzziness when they're at their desks. (If they could, they would be able to read their screen at its native resolution!)

RAV TUX
April 7th, 2007, 11:42 AM
The coolest thing you can do with Linux that you can't do with Mac or Windows is make a derivative distro (legally).


Exactely, the coolest thing I have done is make a linux distro:

Oz (http://www.rpath.org/rbuilder/project/oz/)


http://skins.hotbar.com/skins/mailskins/em/google_emoticons/emoti_5.gif

bran
April 7th, 2007, 12:40 PM
have 4+ wordprocessor windows open working on papers, listen to music, play with Beryl, have contact with a largely happy community and have the requisit firefox, gaim and email clients open all without ever having had to beg someone for a code to make my os work.

marklid
April 7th, 2007, 01:04 PM
xkill :KS

jeffc313
April 7th, 2007, 01:50 PM
wget

sirkism
April 7th, 2007, 04:18 PM
save money for the rest of my life.. hopefully.

Kalixa
April 7th, 2007, 04:24 PM
wget

The only reason I would see why you can't do that on windows or a mac would be that you don't have access to a machine with mac os x or windows.

In other words, wget is available for mac and windows too.

jeffc313
April 7th, 2007, 04:29 PM
The only reason I would see why you can't do that on windows or a mac would be that you don't have access to a machine with mac os x or windows.

In other words, wget is available for mac and windows too.

you are right.. I have neither. But I did not know that!

slider2800
April 7th, 2007, 04:34 PM
I don't know about Macs, but about Linux vs. Windows... well.
Under linux i can work damn fast, damn efficient, not having to fear random crashes.
I can browse EVERYWHERE without having to check over and over again for spyware or other nasty stuff.
everything is configurable, making several things being only a keypress away.

and the eyecandy!!! Under windows i would have to pay a fortune for customization progs that doesn't even work too well.

i just love this OS.

Kalixa
April 7th, 2007, 08:23 PM
you are right.. I have neither. But I did not know that!

Sure.. Np.

brt
April 14th, 2007, 11:45 PM
to me, linux has the ultimate fun factor :)

- need a tool? you're just three clicks away :) more software than you have ever imagined !
- rocksolid
- great performance
- ultimate eyecandy
- dpkg --get-selections > pkg.list, backup /etc, /home on a seperate partition and you are able to recover your system any time, easily :popcorn:

dspari1
April 15th, 2007, 01:03 AM
I always hear about people missing stuff that they could do in windows, and I was just curious what you like doing in Linux you couldn't do in windows...

to get the ball rolling I like the control I have with terminal commands like sed/grep/awk for use with programming and shell scripting.

Beryl.

jgrabham
April 15th, 2007, 01:15 AM
multiple desktops

although in xp I had fun making it say whenever it booted "Now loading microsoft windows XP home edition. AKA a crap OS"

jpkotta
April 15th, 2007, 01:17 AM
GNU Radio (http://www.gnu.org/software/gnuradio/) (it runs under cygwin, but that doesn't count)
A memory manager that doesn't suck.
A disk I/O system that doesn't use all of the system's resources (try doing anything on WinXP while doing a search).

I am still amazed that the OS that I run on my desktop is the same one (sort of) that I'm trying to install on an ARM eval board at work, and the same that runs super computers.

Ptero-4
April 15th, 2007, 02:31 AM
My faves.
Run an OS that:
Isn`t every cracker`s prostitute.
Have built-in effects that pwns Aero.
Is the same OS that runs the biggest iron in the world (read: NASA space missions, scientific supercomputers, etc).

x1a4
April 15th, 2007, 03:00 AM
Resize a partition without having to delete it first and lose data. Although you may be able to do this on a Mac (never had one so don't know) since it's based on OpenBSD Unix.

ceelo
April 15th, 2007, 04:17 AM
I'm gonna go a little more low-key...

1) Highlight to copy & middle click to paste ... any time I touch a windows computer I do this out of habit


OK, I just learned something new. :lol: Pretty sweet.

For me it has to be software management. I recently reinstalled Ubuntu and had all my apps reinstalled in less than half an hour thanks to Synaptic. Not to mention thousands of additional applications readily available without having to search all over the web. Just going through Synaptic and the Add/Remove lists I've come across so many programs that I'd have to look all over the web for on Windows. Everything just feels more ... consistent, I'd have to say. :)

MrChips
April 15th, 2007, 04:37 AM
What do I have with Linux that I don't have with XP or Mac?......money to spend on hardware. Yet still have a reliable, customizable, secure OS.

I thank you all....:cool:

Adamant1988
April 15th, 2007, 06:35 AM
I think probably the coolest thing about GNU/Linux that other systems don't want you using is the CLI. I actually find myself using it for more and more practical purposes as time goes on, it's not pretty but it's quick and it gets the job done very very well.

However, one thing I have done with GNU/Linux that I have never been able to do in Windows
is create a bash script that sorts my /download directory into sub-directories by file type (.mp3 and .ogg to one dir, etc.)

You have no idea how much time that little script has saved me...

weasel fierce
April 15th, 2007, 07:48 AM
Freedom

kevinlyfellow
April 15th, 2007, 08:59 AM
play music via commandline. who needs a clock radio when you have ogg123 and cron?

ixus_123
April 15th, 2007, 02:41 PM
for me it has to to be the pretty basic highlight / middle click to paste feature.

I use this all the time & it kills me when I switch to Win or Mac and can't do it. I also like that it is separate from normal copy & paste so you can have 2 things in teh clipboard :)

Fascination
April 15th, 2007, 02:48 PM
As mentioned, the faithful "sudo apt-get install" line; I still remember a friends shock when he watched me use this for the first time and I explained to him the concept and how it eased getting programs so much. :D
The enhanced feeling of control over my system - being able to find out exactly what its doing, as opposed to have the OS cover up its own tracks also sweetens the deal. :)

BLTicklemonster
April 15th, 2007, 03:25 PM
... how about does anyone know how to turn off the numlucks (numbnuts) key on my keyboard in linux, and can that be done in windows? I have numlock come on automatically in icewm and fluxbox, so I really don't have a use for numlock.

Honestly, if a machine is used primarily for windows, that's the totally most useless key ever. I enter numbers quite often, and my big fat gorilla snot fingers oft times hit the numlock key. <--at work

drbob07
April 15th, 2007, 03:38 PM
I'm going to have to say
1.) Beryl... face it, 3D cube owns all >_<
2.) Having my updates and new distros make my computer run faster, not slower (Sorry Vista, no 512mb of RAM for you)
3.) No typing in a 25-digit product key to realize your dog scratched off the last digit...
4.) Works better with older hardware (for the most part)

BLTicklemonster
April 15th, 2007, 03:41 PM
Oh, and I can install a top notch operating system on all 4 computers here at the house for the cost of one cd-r.


Gotta love that right there, for sure.

Rui Pais
April 15th, 2007, 03:55 PM
For me thinks that i do on linux and i can't do on Windows (never tried a mac, or wished... ) at least with w2k, the last i have it is:

Use xdmcp on gdm to make my good old pentium mmx 200mh run sessions on my core2duo, turn the old piece of garbage on a speedy c2c (without a spend a cent) where my wife or kid work when i work on main terminal. Save environment and money is always cool.

Use cp -a to copy, backup, replicate entire OSs. Use dd to backup MBRs or duplicate OSs across hard discs. Command native of the os. No 3rd party or trisl software.

Run as much Linuxs as i wish, side-by-side on one machine, specially the possibility to run the same version of a distro to test dangerous or experimental software or some cool trick out there, without compromise my working box.

The ability of get the source of anything and see how things are done.

edit: a last though on something very cool that are so few times referred. The freedom of choose which DEs i prefer from dozens of alternatives, from very light to very featured. That is for me the most down thing on Windows world. (if on tux it's impossible to decide what the "best" DE, an eternal flamewar, the poor guys on Win can only have what bill decided... oh boy, and what a terrible thing...)

celsofaf
April 15th, 2007, 04:03 PM
For me? Most certainly the lots of desktops you can keep open at the same time, switching applications between them and such. I find it very useful, and I can't do it under WIndows without some hardwork. Also, I love it when I turn my PC off, then the next day I turn it on, log into my KDE and here it is: everything is there the way I left it, the same programs, the same documents open as it was.

justin
April 16th, 2007, 12:39 AM
Hey, that reminds me! Has anyone else been confused by Windows' Move option in the window right click menus? I click it and it changes my mouse pointer, but absolutely nothing changes; I still have to click on the title bar to move the window. It is a waste of menu space and time! The weirdest part is how that feature has existed in Windows forever. What the heck were / are they thinking? Does nobody notice this completely irrelevant item taking up one of the major menus?
Confuses me greatly. I like Alt-Click, too :)

You use the arrow keys to move the window when you do that.

DarkN00b
April 16th, 2007, 01:32 AM
I just have 2 words -- "command line" .

The terminal alone makes Linux superior to Windows.

Quillz
April 16th, 2007, 01:39 AM
It's a bit minor, but I like how Linux can natively mount disc images, something that requires third party programs in both Windows and OS X.

muguwmp67
April 16th, 2007, 02:52 AM
I try to use the scroll wheel while hovered over slider widgets to move them all the time when I'm in Windows. It never works though.

I can install Linux on a Pentium-266 IBM Thinkpad.

igknighted
April 16th, 2007, 03:03 AM
I just have 2 words -- "command line" .

The terminal alone makes Linux superior to Windows.

OSX has the same terminal, with bash... and I am pretty sure you can do most things with it that you can with linux (commands are mostly the same, and I THINK you can launch apps with it...). Only thing is, you need to know where it is. On my mac I kept it right on the doc because I used it often.

FuturePilot
April 16th, 2007, 03:08 AM
Hmmm, lets see

Make it look however I want it to
Install many programs with one simple command
control how the kernel behaves (try adjusting the swappiness in Windows:-P )

Fixman
September 15th, 2007, 07:18 PM
wget. Nuff said.

hellion0
September 15th, 2007, 07:23 PM
Changing the entire GUI around without having to pay for many differing programs that deliver different results.

From a Vista-clone to an OSX-clone, to something completely new and unique, all free, all STANDARD, and all inside 5 minutes on my laptop!

I <3 versatility.

forrestcupp
September 15th, 2007, 08:46 PM
I can post on these forums without being ripped apart.

As for the Command Line answer, Windows has it too. It's just called "Command Prompt" and it's not used quite as much.

jc87
September 15th, 2007, 09:05 PM
A) APT (and everything related to it), it just rocks baby:)

B) Tons of drivers for default, ALL MY HARDWARE works out of the box with the drivers included (my ati radeon 9250 has got crappy 3d acelaration, and my webcam very low performance, but everything else works like a charm, and sometimes better than in windows).

C) Security, security, security, no need to run AV and such, just install the updates, dont run as root for default and some other small things.

D) I can run one 2007 OS in one 2001 CPU (intel pentium 4 1,7), with great performance and a bunch of neat features.

E) Free as in freedom

F) Tweakable and modular

G) Virtual Desktops

H) Several nice DE“s ( Gnome, Kde, Xfce, etc ....)

I) Several distros to choose from

J) It doesn“t get slow without any reason

L) Can install it while i browse the web

M) Is way 1337

N) Gnu/Linux is like a pet, threat it with respect and love and he will always be loyal to you:)

rsambuca
September 15th, 2007, 09:39 PM
apt-get moo

crypto178
September 15th, 2007, 09:56 PM
What I can do with linux (with gnome at least) is moving around the main window of an application that is showing a modal dialog (therefore "locking" the rest of the application). It's extremely frustrating not being able to do that on Windows.

drbraniac
September 15th, 2007, 10:52 PM
Built-in Workspaces
You can add this feature on both Mac OS X Tiger and Windows, but Linux (at least with Gnome, KDE, and XFCE) has had it built-in for quite some time, I believe. It's very convenient to use, especially as I multi-task on my computer frequently.

Eye-candy that works
I could never do this on Windows. I had Stardock's WindowFX installed, but found it was much too slow; it would also crash if I had animations for dragging windows. I was pleasantly shocked when I got Beryl working; it's very fast on my aging computer. (Now that I think about it, I'm not sure why I found this so important. I guess I like flashy effects?)

Lots of quality, free programmes
This is changing as alot of open-source programmes are cross-platform, but I still find that I have a much wider array of free programmes on Linux. (Or perhaps I just wasn't looking very carefully on Windows or Mac).

hessiess
September 15th, 2007, 11:01 PM
get the scorce code for almost everything

isaacj87
September 15th, 2007, 11:04 PM
What I can do with linux (with gnome at least) is moving around the main window of an application that is showing a modal dialog (therefore "locking" the rest of the application). It's extremely frustrating not being able to do that on Windows.

I totally forgot about stuff like this in Windows...I hated this!!

Frak
September 15th, 2007, 11:04 PM
Software for free, OS for free, software from the CLI, and software from a GUI, but most of all...

A CENTRALIZED WAREHOUSE OF SOFTWARE!!!

'nuff said

cmat
September 15th, 2007, 11:10 PM
Package management and the total functionality of the terminal.

Baby Boy
September 15th, 2007, 11:13 PM
I totally forgot about stuff like this in Windows...I hated this!!
x 2

If I had to name one cool thing, that'd be it.

zeDuffMan
September 15th, 2007, 11:14 PM
APT (Synaptic, Update Manager, etc...makes software maintencence a million times more simple), instant hardware detection (even recognised my scanner which Windows refused to allow to be installed), the ability to be able to do what YOU want, easy UI customisation out of the box (no additional software (except Compiz, but you don't need that) or patching system files), the emphasis on security on the root account (compared to the 'Administrator' account on XP...what a joke...), no WGA or OGA or validation of any kind as almost all software that's available is free anyway, and, of course:

it's free, and always will be!

SammyBoy247
November 7th, 2007, 06:27 PM
I haven't used windows for some time now and don't miss it.

I have to agree with all the previous post but above all.


I love having a community supported OS and Software combo that is always secure, stable, cutting edge and above all functional.

Windows has it's place and some of the developments the Microsoft team have worked on can not be denied. Having said that thank god the open source community was there to tidy up afterwards.

ardchoille42
November 7th, 2007, 06:43 PM
1) I can legally download, install and use Ubuntu on millions of old and new computers without having to pay anyone and it doesn't cost anything.

2) Active viruses = 0

3) I don't have to worry about a closed-source OS grabbing every keystroke and sending it back to some huge database.

4) I can legally change the source code and redistribute it to anyone at any time.

5) I can run a LiveCD on a machine that only has 128 megabytes of ram and no hard drive.

6) If I don't like the file manager, window manager, desktop, I can switch to different ones and I don't even have to reboot.

7) Package managers :)

bruce89
November 7th, 2007, 06:50 PM
[avatar]

That flag seems familiar. It looks like an output from my saltire generation program - https://code.launchpad.net/~bruce89/+junk/flags

marco123
November 7th, 2007, 07:25 PM
Be unique.:)

Be in full control of your computing experience.:)

Leave your computer on for months without catching viruses/adware. :)

jespdj
November 7th, 2007, 08:25 PM
I've never used Mac OS X, so I'm comparing Ubuntu to Windows. My list:

* When I login as a normal user (without root privileges), I can't mess up the system. When I run a new piece of software, I don't have to worry that it changes system configuration files or writes DLLs or configuration files in a system directory somewhere.

* Almost all Ubuntu software is open source. I'm a software developer and I love to be able to look at the source of almost every piece of software and that I can in principle change it.

* Great, easy to use package management and automatic updating of not only the OS itself but of all software installed through the package management system.

* The OS itself and almost all software costs nothing. There is also a lot of software available for Windows, but for the majority you have to pay money. On Windows, people even ask money for silly little programs.

* No need for constantly running a virus scanner.

* The ability to customize the look and feel completely. You can't customize Windows a lot without third party tools. In fact, I read that Microsoft does not want users to customize the Windows look and feel, because it has marketing value to them if all Windows desktops have a common look. I hate being controlled by a commercial company like that!

* Installing Ubuntu is easier than installing Windows. I recently re-installed Windows Vista and Ubuntu 7.10 on my new laptop. After installing Vista, most hardware doesn't work immediately: I had to manually install drivers for my chipset, wireless network card, bluetooth, video, webcam, built-in card reader etc. On Ubuntu, everything worked out-of-the-box; the only thing I had to do was enable the restricted nVidia driver, which was just a few mouse clicks.

Interestedinthepenguin
November 8th, 2007, 06:24 AM
I don't know about Macs, but...

What makes GNU/Linux cooler than Windows is:

The "On Top" option.

Being able to have folders with the same name (but under a different case-pattern) in the same directory. :)

SomeGuyDude
November 8th, 2007, 06:55 AM
Don't those terminal commands (sed, awk) work in Mac OS X?

These are the cool things I can do:
1. Upgrade to the newest version legally and without paying money
2. Have the latest version of the OS run faster than the previous version on the same hardware
3. Easily install and run different graphical interfaces (I tried LiteStep and all the other Windows options--not easy--sorry, Windows enthusiasts)
4. Install twenty programs with one command
5. Have the system automatically update all my installed programs for me.
6. Install the same copy of Ubuntu on multiple computers without worrying about license restrictions or activation keys

I find it amazing that this isn't true for all the others. When you say "Vista requires more hardware to take advantage of it" it sounds great, but when you phrase it as "install it on the same machine and you'll go half as fast" and it sounds horrendous.

Lostincyberspace
November 8th, 2007, 07:05 AM
Boot in less than a minute. And if that isn't acceptable boot in less than half a minute.

rsambuca
November 8th, 2007, 08:18 AM
I find it amazing that this isn't true for all the others. When you say "Vista requires more hardware to take advantage of it" it sounds great, but when you phrase it as "install it on the same machine and you'll go half as fast" and it sounds horrendous.

Yes Vista requires pretty decent hardware to run, but if you have the specs, there is NO way it will run "half as fast" on the same machine. This is just lies.

SomeGuyDude
November 8th, 2007, 08:29 AM
Yes Vista requires pretty decent hardware to run, but if you have the specs, there is NO way it will run "half as fast" on the same machine. This is just lies.

Well I didn't mean literally 50% as fast. I just meant that if I have X memory and Y processor, an upgrade to Vista isn't going to result in a snappier system. You're more likely to be bogged down a bit.

As a Windows user, that didn't bother me, because I never saw the XP -> Vista upgrade as necessary any more than I saw the 2000 -> XP upgrade necessary. It was what you did when you bought a new one because, hell, it cost $150+ to buy the new Windows all by itself, why do that when at some point you'll get a new PC and it'll come with it?

FG123
November 8th, 2007, 08:29 AM
Bah. Why run virus scanners when in Windows?

Only cowards use scanners - I like living on the edge man!

:)

PS. The above is BS.

rsambuca
November 8th, 2007, 08:31 AM
Well I didn't mean literally 50% as fast. I just meant that if I have X memory and Y processor, an upgrade to Vista isn't going to result in a snappier system. You're more likely to be bogged down a bit.

As a Windows user, that didn't bother me, because I never saw the XP -> Vista upgrade as necessary any more than I saw the 2000 -> XP upgrade necessary. It was what you did when you bought a new one because, hell, it cost $150+ to buy the new Windows all by itself, why do that when at some point you'll get a new PC and it'll come with it?

Hey I agree with your main points about upgrading to Vista, but I am just trying to keep it real here. "half as fast" is a lot different than "likely to be bogged down a bit".

toupeiro
November 8th, 2007, 08:46 AM
uptime
23:34:55 up 42 days, 12:16, 2 users, load average: 0.71, 0.35, 0.19
If I hadn't updated my kernel recently, it would have been longer.

my all time record was near the 200 day mark running SuSE. I didn't do kernel updates as frequently.

MONODA
November 8th, 2007, 04:59 PM
coolest thing would have to be painting fire on the screen. but thats not really usefull. the best thing about it is... welll i really cant think of it all but here are some... being able to put comments on files to know how to continue work on them later, not paying for anything, having a super fast system that runs an operating system that can work on almost any computer, virtual desktops... the list goes on

rliegh
November 8th, 2007, 06:42 PM
Fffft. Half the stuff y'all are mentioning either isn't true (wget is available for win32 (http://unxutils.sourceforge.net/)) or is applicable beyond Linux (ability to customize, performance -both FreeBSD and NetBSD provide tools to create your own live cd and spin-off distribution -and ksh beats the /bin/tar out of bash in terms of memory and performance).

Y'all really need to broaden your horizons. Ya Rly.

Also, correct me if I'm wrong but isn't Beryl an Xorg thing? Meaning it would also run on FreeBSD (with the supported video drivers from Nvidia, et al)?

Anyways. What do I like about Linux which is unique to Linux? WINE (in theory it's portable, in practice it really only runs consistently under Linux) and KVM (I'm a virtualization nut, I'm just waiting for the day when one of the BSDs gets a decent virtualization implementation so I can convert to BSD full-time).

maybeway36
November 8th, 2007, 06:47 PM
I would have to say the ability to easily build a system from the ground up by apt-get. (Then again, I guess you could do that in BSD, but they don't have apt)

aysiu
November 8th, 2007, 06:49 PM
Fffft. Half the stuff y'all are mentioning either isn't true (wget is available for win32 (http://unxutils.sourceforge.net/)) or is applicable beyond Linux (ability to customize, performance -both FreeBSD and NetBSD provide tools to create your own live cd and spin-off distribution -and ksh beats the /bin/tar out of bash in terms of memory and performance).

Y'all really need to broaden your horizons. Ya Rly.

Also, correct me if I'm wrong but isn't Beryl an Xorg thing? Meaning it would also run on FreeBSD (with the supported video drivers from Nvidia, et al)? I'm going to correct you.

The thread title says What's the coolest thing you can do in Linux you can't in Windows or Mac?

It doesn't say What's the coolest thing you can do in Linux that can be done only in Linux? So FreeBSD and NetBSD are irrelevant in this context.

rliegh
November 8th, 2007, 06:52 PM
I'm going to correct you.

The thread title says What's the coolest thing you can do in Linux you can't in Windows or Mac?

It doesn't say What's the coolest thing you can do in Linux that can be done only in Linux? So FreeBSD and NetBSD are irrelevant in this context.

Ok, good point. :guitar:

aysiu
November 8th, 2007, 06:56 PM
Your point about wget still stands, though.

Occasionally Correct
November 8th, 2007, 07:48 PM
I don't feel like I have a whole in my pocket after upgrading. :p

rsambuca
November 8th, 2007, 08:05 PM
I don't feel like I have a whole in my pocket after upgrading. :p

A whole 'what'?

peabody
November 8th, 2007, 08:16 PM
Sorry to drug up this thread, but I found it in search and thought it was interesting, but didn't see any posts that truly mentioned something functionally that can't be done in Windows.

Crack wireless networks using WEP encryption in mere minutes.

This requires a wireless driver capable of wireless packet injection. I've heard of third party drivers in Windows XP that will do such, but now that Vista's out, I've heard most of them don't work anymore.

That's true power. Customizability right down to how you talk to the hardware.

happysmileman
November 8th, 2007, 08:34 PM
Sorry to drug up this thread, but I found it in search and thought it was interesting, but didn't see any posts that truly mentioned something functionally that can't be done in Windows.

Crack wireless networks using WEP encryption in mere minutes.

This requires a wireless driver capable of wireless packet injection. I've heard of third party drivers in Windows XP that will do such, but now that Vista's out, I've heard most of them don't work anymore.

That's true power. Customizability right down to how you talk to the hardware.

Sounds like you mean breaking into peoples wireless connections, not sure if that should really count.



Anyway mine is theming without needing 3rd party software, though I never really bother with compiz-fusion any more.
Updating all my software at once (yes absolutely everything on my computer now, open or closed source, is handles by portage)
Compiling everything
Being able to use console for anything (though personally I just prefer Python, and I don't script much anyway)


And the applications, but they probably don't count

Occasionally Correct
November 8th, 2007, 09:32 PM
A whole 'what'?

Typo. I meant "hole". :p

Mr Wrath
November 8th, 2007, 09:54 PM
I agree with Aysiu...

wlc3069
November 8th, 2007, 11:29 PM
Easily upgrade and downgrade the kernel. If you totally mess something up, you can easily undo any mistake.

Frak
November 9th, 2007, 01:15 AM
Boot in less than a minute. And if that isn't acceptable boot in less than half a minute.
My Mac can boot in just under 4 seconds fully into OS X.

bruce89
November 9th, 2007, 01:18 AM
My Mac can boot in just under 4 seconds fully into OS X.

That's because the OS X kernel only has to support a tiny spectrum of hardware.

Perhaps I've mentioned this before, but I love using the mouse wheel to move between workspaces, GTK+ tabs etc.

markp1989
November 9th, 2007, 01:26 AM
highlight and middle click to copy and paste, i always do this when on a windows machine, and get pissed of when it doesnt work


customise every single part of the operating system without having to spend money on addons that slow the system to a crawl

FG123
November 9th, 2007, 01:39 AM
I like the fact there's very little (if anything) in Linux that's actively hidden or blocked from accessing. Plus, all the features of Linux/Ubuntu are known, there are no secrets, no hidden technologies, probably no backdoors.

The coolest thing about Linux? It affords me a sense of privacy that I'll never achieve under Windows or a Mac.

mridkash
November 9th, 2007, 10:43 AM
Live CD
Amarok
mencoder
Compiz
Pidgin
Ubuntu Forums
dot Files

vishzilla
November 9th, 2007, 11:20 AM
Make full use of the Terminal!!!!

BigSilly
November 9th, 2007, 12:00 PM
Whats the coolest thing you can do in Linux you cant in windows or mac?


To be able to distribute it among friends and install it on as many PC's as I wish without fear of recourse.

Nothing's cooler than the freedom of Linux.

bruce89
November 9th, 2007, 02:07 PM
Whats the coolest thing you can do in Linux you cant in windows or mac?

Compiling C the easy way.

Capricori
November 11th, 2007, 11:27 AM
1) Buy an old computer for £15 on eBay, the kind that could just about run Win 95 at a reasonable speed, install Xubuntu/Fluxbox/lightweight WM of your choice, and end up with a machine that is every bit as functional, and yet quicker, than my friends' brand new £600+ Vista machine.

2) Use Amarok! (unless they ported it to Windows yet?)

Anessen
November 11th, 2007, 01:22 PM
View and edit the source code.

Be a part of a real community.

Richard Stallman.

marco123
November 11th, 2007, 01:49 PM
highlight and middle click to copy and paste, i always do this when on a windows machine, and get pissed of when it doesnt work


customise every single part of the operating system without having to spend money on addons that slow the system to a crawl

Nice one, I didn't know about that one.:) I'll be doing that all the time now, thanks!:) I've always right clicked to copy/paste, I can't believe I'm still learning cool new things about Linux. :)

Mad Malc
November 13th, 2007, 07:26 PM
Here's a really simple thing you can do in Linux but not easily in Windows.

Create listing of all files in a folder on a spreadsheet, by simply opening the folder choosing select all and then copy, followed by pasting it onto a blank spreadsheet.

So simple.

santiagoward2000
November 14th, 2007, 05:29 AM
apt-get moo

DEFINITELY :lolflag:

rundee_f
November 14th, 2007, 06:13 AM
as simple as rotating my desktop, making it like a cube, shift-switching windows,,

and also, i dont have to update antivirus no more.. :lolflag:

SomeGuyDude
November 14th, 2007, 09:49 AM
DOWNGRADE.

I called Hewlett-Packard to ask hypothetically about downgrading Vista to XP. Not only was I told that my computer couldn't do it, but if I attempted to on my own I would void the damn warantee.

Also, I can upgrade no matter what. If I'm buying a new computer, I'm not going to have to look for a sticker on it that says "Hardy Heron Capable". For that matter, I'm not going to have to get a new computer if I want to use a future version of the OS.

Computer Guru
November 14th, 2007, 09:56 AM
Have a stable PC that does ONLY what I want and nothing more... or less.

de_valentin
November 14th, 2007, 10:15 AM
I like the Eye-candy its great and doesn't slow me down, I like it how easy it is to install new apps, I like the way everything gets upgraded whenever there is a relevant upgrade. I like the way I upgraded the entire system from feisty to gutsy with just a few clicks. I like the stable feel it has. I like it a lot that whenever I need xp, in vbox it is ready to go in under 20 seconds. I think its great that you can scroll in any window as long as your mouse is on it. I don't think I can live without 'Ctrl-Alt-arrows' anymore.
I think I should just stop because I could go on all day like this.

misfitpierce
November 14th, 2007, 10:17 AM
you can escape from microsoft... :) Thats something you cant do in windows :)

Unterseeboot_234
November 14th, 2007, 10:25 AM
Enjoyed all the educational aspects of the prior posts on this thread. For me, I realized significant time saved doing video and animation projects on a 64-bit Linux. While graphic rendering, I can still access the Internet and go about using other computer programs. With the other OS, I was dedicating hardware to run, making sure the screen saver didn't turn on and taping a note onto the keyboard to leave this workstation running. The other OS has software that is greedy and it will claim memory. Linux keeps workspaces solid.

NotTheMessiah
November 14th, 2007, 10:35 AM
The coolest thing i can do in linux is the ability to stop using XP or at least reduce it to a minimum:lolflag:

maluka
November 14th, 2007, 01:38 PM
definitely Compiz-Fusion FTW!! :biggrin:

smithman89
November 14th, 2007, 01:52 PM
The fact that, if something doesnt work, you can legally fix the code to make it work.
Also, how you only really need to restart the computer after a kernel upgrade, instead of restarting after every program is installed in Windows.

xpod
November 14th, 2007, 02:01 PM
Download and install the OS in half an hour.....if & when conditions allow:)

dnns123
November 14th, 2007, 03:18 PM
You can literally rescue your entire OS with a live CD, just like what I did a few hours ago. (goofed up using the startup manager)

With Windows, I wouldve just given up. Back up my files (120+GB). and formated my HDD. Imagine the stress in doing that! Then installing all BS drivers, previous apps you forgot you have, and all other minor things that make your computer "yours".

silviur
November 14th, 2007, 04:04 PM
Being able to test a fully functional OS from a liveCD.

-grubby
November 14th, 2007, 04:07 PM
Being able to test a fully functional OS from a liveCD.

+1

stoodleysnow
November 14th, 2007, 04:36 PM
To the majority of the above, I agree.

Kadrus
November 14th, 2007, 04:42 PM
I don't care what people say..Linux Owns!!!

zach12
November 14th, 2007, 04:59 PM
sudo apt-get install
:lolflag:

markp1989
November 15th, 2007, 01:53 PM
sudo apt-get install
:lolflag:

yep apt-get has made my life so much easier, no having to search on the internet for an installer that is most likely infected with viruses

Joedude
November 15th, 2007, 02:31 PM
I can chat directly with the developers on forums and irc to pose new ideas without getting snotty replies or demeaning comments.

sailor2001
November 15th, 2007, 02:50 PM
having the absolute freedom to build your box exactly like you want it an know that you are the only one in the world with a box like yours

Ex-windows
November 20th, 2007, 06:09 PM
I ove the fact that I can Have (if I choose) the very latest os legallly and free. Also No "Adaware" "Spybot" Anti virus" "Defrags" etc.
I also like the fact that
all the stuff I can download will be safe for my comp, and again there is that"free thing"
And This Forum board ( and the folks in it) are great.
I mean have u ever tried getting an answer from MS???
Take care all

Calash
November 20th, 2007, 06:17 PM
Two things really stick in my mind.

1 - LiveCD, try before you install is great.

2 - At any time I can not only totally customise the desktop interface, but I can also replace it with any number of other options. All of this with a few clicks in Synaptic. This to me is a huge selling point...the OS does not work for you? Change the interface to meet your needs, it is still the same OS.

PmDematagoda
November 20th, 2007, 06:23 PM
The best thing I love about Linux is that you can solve or find a work-around for virtually any problem on Linux. I say this from 4 months of making mistakes on Ubuntu which caused it to crash on numerous occasions and with the fact that I was able to track down and solved about 95% of the problems, keep in mind that some of those problems were rather severe such as breaking the X-server, I cannot do this on Windows, I just simply have to reinstall the entire OS in order to recover the OS:-P.

g4ry.l33
November 21st, 2007, 05:50 AM
Take charge of My Computer!

kaos13
November 21st, 2007, 05:57 AM
The Live Cd's
Compiz Fusion
The community

Mr. Picklesworth
November 21st, 2007, 07:38 AM
Enormous pixel density, yet all text on the system remains readable.

Proper right-to-left language support. I don't speak any, but I tried one just for the sake of it!

LaRoza
November 21st, 2007, 07:44 AM
If this hasn't been mentioned, I like the heated arguments that arise about OS's among users that use the same operating system

EXCiD3
November 21st, 2007, 07:44 AM
I'm pretty sure the coolest thing i can do with linux is have a almost infinitely long uptime without any worries.

No reason for shutdown/reboot unless you have made some big system changes! No nagging to reboot every 5 mins and restarting the xserver (which is extremely fast btw) is the closest thing to a reboot i ever need and it still counts as uptime! TAKE THAT M$ :p

bmwerks
November 23rd, 2007, 02:15 AM
the best thing is being able to start working just seconds after putting in my password which on windows ill actually forget y im in front of the computer before it loads. compiz-fusion is AWESOME!! i love the community ive found answers to many problems and its never annoying more like an adventure and it supports everything i have attached i didnt even have to put in a cd of which i have many, to install any hardware
LINUX rocks!!!!

regomodo
November 23rd, 2007, 10:19 AM
use my wintv nova-t tv card in a 64bit os. There are no 64bit drives for this card in XP

RJ Fighter
November 23rd, 2007, 10:30 AM
More than one workspace by default, and without any third party software. I scrapped my second monitor because of it, since they do just fine.

qubodup
November 24th, 2007, 03:16 AM
in linux, you can, in contrary to windows and macosx
1. not use a gui and still make sense
2. use ratpoison (http://www.nongnu.org/ratpoison/)

slimdog360
November 24th, 2007, 03:22 AM
look down at those who use windows.

IISpII
November 24th, 2007, 05:16 AM
move a file while its bieng used by another program

todoporron
December 19th, 2007, 10:36 PM
-Spend my time playing with my daughter than hunting viruses and malware on the PC.

-Freedommmmm!! (as William Wallace shouted in braveheart.) lol.

dmazzone
December 19th, 2007, 11:46 PM
-CLI is amazing and i love being able to use bash scripts.

-linux isn't perfect but the solutions to its problem are usually much nicer than solutions to other OS woes [if any even exist].

-compiz fusion == beautiful and it wil even run on my two year old laptop

rsambuca
December 20th, 2007, 12:16 AM
-CLI is amazing and i love being able to use bash scripts...
You can do that on a mac too, since Mac is Unix based.

el_ricardo
December 20th, 2007, 12:27 AM
virtual desktops, virtual terminals, multiple X sessions with multiple users, all on 1 home PC, if a windows PC tried this it would simply run out of RAM

efficiency is the coolest thing about linux, windows doesn;t do this, mac does to an extent, but it's dwarfed by linux

chips24
January 4th, 2008, 03:02 AM
i love the customization!!!!

aktiwers
January 4th, 2008, 03:22 AM
LinuxMCE

hhhhhx
January 4th, 2008, 03:35 AM
not pay a single dime :lolflag:

Pethegreat
January 4th, 2008, 03:35 AM
sudo apt-get install *program here*

I thought it could not get better for installing software than windows had it. ATP does everything for you. Synpatic is nice as well since it will resolve dependency issues when you choose to install things. If you are missing something in window, you have to find it your self.

barbedsaber
January 4th, 2008, 03:56 AM
It works, which windows gets no points for.


ABSOULUTE FREEDOM!

also penguins are cooler than coulerd squares.

barbedsaber
January 4th, 2008, 04:00 AM
Linux has quite a few bugs, you must addmit that it not everything works on every computer in the world out of the box, still it does this better than windows, The key difference is, linux is open source, and for every bug, there is a developr (or 20) each armed with a can of "bug spray"

graabein
January 4th, 2008, 10:06 AM
Take full control of your personal computer. Tailor it to your taste.

bufsabre666
January 4th, 2008, 10:11 AM
lets go over my list

security with no aditional programming needed
synaptic
easy installs and can install from source easy
synaptic
easy to use prgram
synaptic
tons of open source stuff
open formats but some support for proprietary
and of course
the synaptic

lisati
January 4th, 2008, 10:25 AM
sudo apt-get install *program here*


Not to forget apt-get's big brother


sudo aptitude install *program here*

RSLxH
January 4th, 2008, 10:26 AM
Leave it running for 3 months non-stop without a reboot.

Magnes
January 4th, 2008, 10:32 AM
Rotate Compiz Fusion cube with a stupid look on a face. ;)

bufsabre666
January 4th, 2008, 10:35 AM
Rotate Compiz Fusion cube with a stupid look on a face. ;)

i do that all the time

but i cant get the stupid look on my face to disappear =(

Kingsley
January 4th, 2008, 10:38 AM
Quickly set up an FTP server. I tried doing it in Vista and ended up wanting to punch my monitor.

Kyran
January 4th, 2008, 10:40 AM
Keeping everything on your system up-to-date via APT. And sudo apt-get *program* is also neat.


i love the customization!!!!

That too.

JacobRogers
January 4th, 2008, 11:22 AM
I'm a noob but my favorite feature is the way Ubuntu approaches software and has repos from which you can easily and securely download programs. And as mentioned I really like how an installation of Ubuntu comes with just about everything you need except multimedia support.

quanumphaze
January 5th, 2008, 03:55 AM
This is really simple but I love how it handles my laptops track pad.

It not only has scroll areas in the 7mm from the right and lower edges (Windows did this too with driver software) but it also has virtual right and middle click when I tap the lower right and upper right corners respectively.

I also like how it can make and mount iso files natively out of the box.

Methuselah
January 5th, 2008, 09:27 AM
futz



After a while using Linux, going back to windows feels klunky and awkward. Linux isn't perfect (yet), but I like it.


Yup I dual boot for now and when I go back to my XP partition, I quickly realise how long I have to wait for it to do anything.

MrChips



What do I have with Linux that I don't have with XP or Mac?......money to spend on hardware. Yet still have a reliable, customizable, secure OS.



Agreed, I'm building a new PC and noticed that Vista Ultimate would be the single most expensive component I could buy. More expensive that the intel Quad Core CPU, more expensive than the motehrboard, more expensive than the case. Fortunately I can ignore it becuase there is Linux and *BSD. :)

A few other things I like are the flexibility of 'mount' and multiple workspaces.

Of course, I also love the Freedom.
I'm not talking about money, it's good enough to buy.
I'm talking about the fact that I don't turn into a criminal if I install it on multiple PCs and nobody is creating hashes of my machine hardware IDs to keep tabs on me etc.

sailor2001
January 5th, 2008, 10:28 PM
synaptics...............the greatest invention of all.. (of course not an invention)

bomanizer
January 5th, 2008, 10:37 PM
1. apt-get
2. have fun

~LoKe
January 5th, 2008, 10:41 PM
apt-get update && apt-get upgrade
The beauty of this is in the simplicity. With one small line of code I can bring my system up-to-date without having to worry about contaminated packages/programs. No hassle of re-authenticating (I've had to call Microsoft for new product keys).

snickers295
January 5th, 2008, 10:44 PM
use my computer lol.

atomkarinca
January 5th, 2008, 10:56 PM
1. I can have an English desktop and my sister can have a Turkish desktop on the same machine.
2. I can boot up a PC with Ubuntu without even a harddrive.
3. My machine is up more than 10 days now and it's still using 4% of the CPU (I've got Azureus, Firefox, Opera (I have my reasons :)) and Exaile still open and working really hard).
4. I know that every 6 months I'm going to get a new and ACTUALLY better version.

Praadur
January 6th, 2008, 12:17 AM
I expect that someone's already mentioned this but...

My favourite thing? It has to be true system wide user and file priveleges. I enthuse about this, and frequently. Windows doesn't have a file-based privelege system at all that I've seen (at least, not one that can't be gotten around easily) and other than that, one is either root and can do everything but is also very vulnerable, or one is a 'user' and has some amount of security but can do next to nothing at all.

Due to user groups, the sudo command, the root terminal, and the aforementioned true file privelege systems, I can run my Linux system as I want to. In this case, I really can have my cake and eat it, too.

I think if I ever had to go back to the 'go offline, login to root, do something, log out of root, log into user, go online, do stuff, notice I've forgotten something, go offline, login to root, fix, log out of root, log into user, go back online' nonsense of Windows, I'd weep openly.

Omnios
January 6th, 2008, 12:30 AM
K This is a biggie for me. !

1- I can afford the software.
2- I can boot and go as apposed to upgrading virus and spy ware defs

bruce89
January 6th, 2008, 12:50 AM
sudo /etc/init.d/* restart instead of rebooting. (replace * with something)

metalpancake
January 6th, 2008, 12:58 AM
I like Ubuntu because it isn't perfect, and nor does it claim to be.
I like it how it forces me into action if something I really want to work doesn't for any reason.:)
It's also much faster than my windows instalation, and is not subject to constant spyware attacks.
I also think it is a much more 'friendly' os than windows simply because it is free and community based and not constantly dictated by DRM.:)

Praadur
January 6th, 2008, 01:07 AM
I like it how it forces me into action if something I really want to work doesn't for any reason.:)

Blast, I knew I forgot something I wanted to add, there.

This is actually something that's on my mind a lot with Linux, and it's actually the reason for one of the lines in my signature. Windows by and large is a very 'push button > get pellet' experience. If something works, it works and if it doesn't, it doesn't and that's that.

Whereas in any Linux distro things go far beyond that. One can ask questions like: Does the application offer its sources? Has someone found and released a patch for this already, that I could compile into those sources myself? Is this a simple error that I could likely report and posibly even fix myself?

If all one has is a precompiled (and possibly encrypted in some way) binary then one has to spend ages trying to work their way around a problem rather than fixing it, it's either that or give up and wait until the one author responsible for the program fixes it her or himself.

-grubby
January 6th, 2008, 01:08 AM
restart the xserver

Sam
January 6th, 2008, 01:19 AM
Use a complete OS for 0 bucks, at least legally...

metalpancake
January 6th, 2008, 01:21 AM
If all one has is a precompiled (and possibly encrypted in some way) binary then one has to spend ages trying to work their way around a problem rather than fixing it, it's either that or give up and wait until the one author responsible for the program fixes it her or himself.

It's the best way to learn, isn't it?:guitar:

GSF1200S
January 6th, 2008, 01:22 AM
1) Scripts
2) Feel morally content while using my OS
3) Launch every single thing I need from the taskbar without opening the menu
4) Keep the system tray free of clutter, and put anything in there that I want
5) Change the color of which window is active and inactive in the taskbar
6) Have system monitors for cpu usage core 1 & 2, as well as RAM in the taskbar
7) Click Show Desktop once to show desktop, click it again to un-minimize everything
8) Not worry about viruses
9) Use scripts to configure EXACTLY what happens when I start the computer
10) Amarok- im sorry, its just awesome
11) Virtual workspaces (weve had it forever)

GSF1200S
January 6th, 2008, 01:24 AM
restart the xserver

Oh man, how could I forget this!?

"you know what, I feel like openbox"

Ctrl + Alt + Backspace

**EDIT** Haha, reading through this thread, I keep finding more stuff I love. +1 for 64bit support, whoevers brainchild that was :)

GSF1200S
January 6th, 2008, 01:30 AM
The beauty of this is in the simplicity. With one small line of code I can bring my system up-to-date without having to worry about contaminated packages/programs. No hassle of re-authenticating (I've had to call Microsoft for new product keys).

Yeah, and its really awesome with bash aliasing too... For example on my box:

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get clean

is handled by typing the following, hitting enter, entering my password, and hitting enter again:

fullupgrade

I simply type that and my whole OS is updated =D>

**EDIT** As a final note, just the philosophy of why Linux exists. Its really such a noble effort now, and by nature no propietary OS can compete with that.

peabody
January 8th, 2008, 07:08 AM
Encrypt your swap partition in a straight forward way.

It's possible in windows I suppose, but anyone actually know how to do it?

AegisTalons
January 8th, 2008, 07:44 AM
1) Increased productivity because of multiple work spaces.
2) Awesome GUI - Fully custimizable
3) Running "advance" GUI software (Compiz Fusion) that would oherwise not run or slow down my 4 year old laptop on any other OS

Takmadeus
January 8th, 2008, 08:19 AM
Working :p

seriously.... I can surf the web, play GBA, write documents and listen to music, all in one simple package ;) (and at the same time :)

Espreon
January 8th, 2008, 08:20 AM
1. Take advantage of my decent graphics card with the latest GIT version of CF (Its true power was never unleashed on Winblows)

2. Boot in less than 1 min and 30 secs

3. Enjoy using the computer

4. Actually learn how to do things like compile

5. Being able to customize my desktop to the ultimate level

6. Use bleeding edge software

7. Not having to reboot 2-3 times a day

Nessa
January 8th, 2008, 08:23 AM
Tinker with the OS without worries. I've learned a whole lot since I installed Ubuntu.

Mr. Picklesworth
January 8th, 2008, 08:28 AM
Ooh, I have another!

Use F-Spot, which lets me search for a picture that has two people but not a certain other, in a particular place. Other photo managers are pitiful in comparison :)
Having absolutely everything unified under the single tagging system is amazingly simple, yet very powerful.

Good tab completion in the terminal, completing commands as well as command lines, sometimes even dynamically.

While fschk is somewhat obtrusive in running every 30th time I start the computer, its findings are actually good for something! Instead of just saying "Haha, that data is corrupted!", that fact is remembered. Later, Aptitude notices that the corrupted files are associated with a particular package and offers to have it reinstalled.

allforcarrie
January 8th, 2008, 08:33 AM
I love being able to custimize and change themes without third party help.

jeffus_il
January 8th, 2008, 08:44 AM
Install software that is not stolen!
I'm a regular straight honest guy, never stole, never lied, never robbed a bank, don't even cheat on my partner,
but I did steal software, now with Linux I have become honest again, a regular ANGEL
http://www.whylinuxisbetter.net/items/warez/index.php

Espreon
January 8th, 2008, 08:53 AM
Install software that is not stolen!
I'm a regular straight honest guy, never stole, never lied, never robbed a bank, don't even cheat on my partner,
but I did steal software, now with Linux I have become honest again, a regular ANGEL

No you did not steal the software, you stole the companys' chances of making money.

Trail
January 8th, 2008, 09:05 AM
No you did not steal the software, you stole the companys' chances of making money.
In that case, they have to do better than that. Pity.

bufsabre666
January 8th, 2008, 09:39 AM
i love how everything works together, in ubuntu i can drag a picture in firefox and then drop it into a text dock or pidgin and itll put the url, also works with text, this is really something windows should work on, its not a necessary feature but its still nice to have

barbedsaber
January 8th, 2008, 01:02 PM
It runs FAST on my almost 4 year old computer, with cube and games at 47 average frames per second. Windows gave me 10 for same game.

the ultimate FREEDOM to copy share give tinker modify work live.

ALL HAIL SUPREME PENGUIN POWER!

sleepingdragon
January 8th, 2008, 06:19 PM
Being able to use the mouse about 2 mins faster from power-on than Windows... Sometimes I miss the oh-so-speedy loading of ZoneAlarm and AVG...

Lord DarkPat
January 8th, 2008, 06:30 PM
1) modify the heck out of it
2) Get it free
3) Terminal Rocks(windows only, Mac has a terminal, too)
4) Run Compiz (my favorite)
5) stay up-to-date with all software
6) Do a million things with one terminal command
7) It's way faster on my comp than windows

Well, I could go on :D

Luffield
January 8th, 2008, 06:56 PM
**** ** -**, of course! :D
Wait a second, I think I can do it on a Mac as well :-\

Seriously, though: it's the feeling of freedom that I like best when I use Ubuntu. Windows makes me feel like I'm using a platform for promoting other Microsoft products and services.
OS X is nice, I have to say.

Lord DarkPat
January 8th, 2008, 07:42 PM
Dont shake off the noobs :D:lolflag:

sujoy
January 8th, 2008, 07:51 PM
The coolest thing I can do in Linux is distro hopping :guitar:
the next best would be a kernel recompilation.....now thats uber cool.

savagenator
January 9th, 2008, 03:53 AM
lets see.....

cube (makes me life cleaner and easier)
speed (on my computer its the same as vista.....after I tweaked the living hell out of it)
packages (and windows users are baffled at the concept)
prettyness (good to look at, better than XP, rivals vista)
random features including....

highlight, middleclick paste
scroll through windows when hovering over window list
terminal
and loads more...

rjon17469
January 13th, 2008, 06:59 AM
There are a lot of easy things in Ubuntu that can make the Windows guys drool, but one of mine always gets them.

My system runs a raid 1. Every four hours the raid is checked. If a problem is found, the status is sent via text message to my cell phone.

popch
January 13th, 2008, 10:22 AM
Every four hours the raid is checked. If a problem is found, the status is sent via text message to my cell phone.

That would drive me quite mad. Imagine: every four hours I have to decide if I want to be glad that the raid did not find a problem or if I want to regret that no cool message has been sent to my cell.

sicofante
January 13th, 2008, 10:50 AM
Not trying to rain on this parade, but... After reading the first 6 pages (and the last) of this thread, I find it a bit worrying that I can't see the computer being used as a tool but as toy (not being despective). I mean, you people enjoy computers, you like computers. That's fine with me (I do like them too), but most people complaining about things they can do in Windows that they can't do in Linux usually talk of things they use the computers for, not the computers themselves.

I mean, nobody seems to be saying (unless someone did in the pages I haven't read) that they can create music easier in Linux, or that they can write documents or spreadsheets easier, or Linux has made their accounting easier than ever. No, all of the advantages of Linux seem to relate to the computer and the OS itself, not the tasks that can be achieved better with the computer when using Linux.

Maybe Linux is still and will always be an OS for computer hobbyists? That does worry me. I build computers for a living and I'm trying to put Ubuntu in my boxes. I'd love to have better arguments for my customers than "you can build your own distro" or "you will freak out when you see your wobbling windows" or "there won't be any virus" (virus are very well controlled these days in Windows, BTW).

I've been using Ubuntu myself (though not exclusively) for the last few months and I can see some niceties, but none really that can't be had in Windows. I honestly started reading this thread looking for those arguments for my computers. So far, the best I can think of is "it's an OK Windows alternative and it's free". Not very enthusiastic, I'm afraid. :(

popch
January 13th, 2008, 11:31 AM
So far, the best I can think of is "it's an OK Windows alternative and it's free". Not very enthusiastic, I'm afraid. :(

Given the title of the thread, I think the kind of responses we are getting here is kind of predictable.

Finding a one-of-a-kind application running on only one OS would be a very rare find indeed. At least I can't think of one offhand.

If it bothers you that normal users can do on Linux just what they can do on Windows (or on Mac OS) as well: it shouldn't.

I find it very encouraging that you can do the same with Linux as you can do with Windows, with software wich is free of costs and runs on cheaper or older hardware.

Besides, there's the fact that the software you are bound to use with Linux does not lock your documents and data into proprietary formats as much as the competitors do.

It's clearly a win. (pun intended, of course)

sicofante
January 13th, 2008, 12:35 PM
Don't get me wrong. I still push Ubuntu for my users and I'm not missing any particular app. I do regret however, that the best things to be said about an OS don't involve being more productive or doing things easier. If I were just selling computers and there was any opennes to system integrators from Apple, I would probably be building and selling Macs. There are tons of nice things you can say to a novice regarding Macs. (Apple sells direct in my country, and I generally dislike their business model, so there's no point in helping them.) I kind of expected reading that sort of things in this thread and what worries me is the lack of interest in usability, consistency, well thought apps, strong integration, getting things done, "just works", etc. (you can definitely say those things about the Mac).

Not trying to start a flame or spoil everyone else's enthusiasm though. Please keep posting your experiences.

billgoldberg
January 13th, 2008, 02:18 PM
1. Compiz Fusion(i use it all the time because it makes me word alot faster and looks great)
2. Multiple desktops
3. higlight/middle click
4. Synaptic and Add/remove
5. The terminal
6. alt+f2
7. gnomelook.org
8. ubuntuforums.org
9. the security (if i am on windows i constantly worry about malware and stuff like that)
10. new version every 6 months

Those aren't in any specific order.

Also I just don't like windows xp (vista is a bit better) anymore. It feels so primitive. It feels like you don't have any control over it.

Also the troubleshooting in windows is that much harder. In ubuntu you just open the program in terminal and it tells you what's wrong.
When something goes wrong in windows I immediatly think: virus.

billgoldberg
January 13th, 2008, 02:27 PM
sicofante:
"or "there won't be any virus" (virus are very well controlled these days in Windows, BTW)."

That's one of the best arguments I heared.

That viruses are well controled these days may be true for the power users (but they can get them too) but that's just not true for the avarage user. Even with the best security software (spyware sweeper, nod32, zonealarm firewall, ...) most of them get viruses anyway.

rudihawk
January 13th, 2008, 03:54 PM
Stability!
The cube and fancy desktop effects, theme changes etc - all without 3rd party programs.
Bundled apps - Open Office, pidgin, GIMP, etc
Efficeny - can get working faster
Its quite hard for the average user to break :P
Support for .iso's out of the box
The community! - IRC channel esp, very helpful
Makes my old PC run like it is a dual core monster, whoot!
Freedom!
...

reacocard
January 14th, 2008, 02:05 AM
Not trying to rain on this parade, but... After reading the first 6 pages (and the last) of this thread, I find it a bit worrying that I can't see the computer being used as a tool but as toy (not being despective). I mean, you people enjoy computers, you like computers. That's fine with me (I do like them too), but most people complaining about things they can do in Windows that they can't do in Linux usually talk of things they use the computers for, not the computers themselves.

I mean, nobody seems to be saying (unless someone did in the pages I haven't read) that they can create music easier in Linux, or that they can write documents or spreadsheets easier, or Linux has made their accounting easier than ever. No, all of the advantages of Linux seem to relate to the computer and the OS itself, not the tasks that can be achieved better with the computer when using Linux.

The thing is, improving document editing or accounting is almost entirely the domain of the application you are using, not the OS you run it on. However, aspects of your OS's environment, such as multiple desktops or middle-click paste, can have an ancillary positive effect on efficiency, but this is not generally noticed as 'Linux sped up my accounting', but rather as, 'Linux is faster and more pleasant to use'.


Maybe Linux is still and will always be an OS for computer hobbyists? That does worry me. I build computers for a living and I'm trying to put Ubuntu in my boxes. I'd love to have better arguments for my customers than "you can build your own distro" or "you will freak out when you see your wobbling windows" or "there won't be any virus" (virus are very well controlled these days in Windows, BTW).

Perhaps on the desktop linux will remain primarily hobbiest, but already linux is well-established in many everyday things. Your router likely runs a form of linux, TiVo runs on linux, many cell phones and PDAs run linux.... In embedded devices, linux is already strong and only gaining momentum.

kool_kat_os
January 14th, 2008, 02:14 AM
This is all of the reasons that I call it the "Kool Kat OS"

shad0w_walker
January 14th, 2008, 02:20 AM
Have you considered that this thread is the COOLEST thing you can do with Linux. Last I checked most people find spreadsheets and other such stuff to be quite dull.

Also, to cover the usefulness arguement. DVD transcoding cluster. Tell me when you set that up in windows. I also have my various bash scripts to manage things I would require some stupidly expensive program to manage in windows with similar ease.

Linux is what you make of it and from what I can tell you are making a word processor out of it. I'm making servers and a rock solid desktop setup.

In short. You are looking for things that say 'Wow. This bit of third party software that probably isn't Linux only and there for shouldn't be mentioned in this thread is making my spreadsheet work so much easier.' You won't find that in this thread for that very obvious reason, it's not what this thread is about.

andale
January 14th, 2008, 04:30 AM
Ok, I haven't seen it here or maybe I skipped a page but I think I know the best one.

Community.

Nowhere on the internet have I found so many people who often are willing to help and nowhere have I seen so little criticism.
I only made Ubuntu my main OS for the first time about 3 or 4 days ago. I have installed it (and others) several times but always just stuck with windows for gaming convenience. My gaming machine died and I've fallen back to an older one made of scraps, so I figured it was time to learn something new.
Everyone on this forum seems to do a pretty great job. Thanks to this forum in particular I have managed a full upgrade from dapper to gutsy (had live disc and no burner to create new uptodate 7.1) and i've installed a dozen programs and gotten that 3d desktop i always dreamed of, plus the bonus of setting my screen on fire when it argues with me.
Ok, sorry. Ranting. Point is:
=D> Linux community = AWESOME! =D>

swoll1980
January 14th, 2008, 04:47 AM
surf the web without av software

Capricori
January 14th, 2008, 07:17 AM
I mean, nobody seems to be saying (unless someone did in the pages I haven't read) that they can create music easier in Linux, or that they can write documents or spreadsheets easier, or Linux has made their accounting easier than ever.

That's probably because the thread is asking for the 'coolest' things :)
But still - you can run the latest version of Ubuntu without having to upgrade your hardware. When Microsoft stop supporting XP, I wonder how many of your customers are asking you for Vista-capable machines?

Ubuntu is also (generally) faster. You can play with your spreadsheets and word processors a lot quicker if your machine boots quicker, logs in quicker, and doesn't take 5 minutes to load Excel.

Also, the bit about viruses being well handled in Windows. Tell your customers that there's lots of software that they can install and configure to keep their Windows box (reasonably) safe.... or they can install Ubuntu, know that their computer is already safe, and jump straight into their spreadsheets :)

brunovecchi
January 14th, 2008, 11:02 AM
I've never used a Mac so I wouldn't know.
The coolest thing (and I think that this point can't be stressed enough) is the terminal: grep, awk, regexes, pipes!!!

everyday life:

Say, I want to open that file that I just created and don't remember where it is...

find $HOME -type f -cmin 5 | head --lines=1 | xargs gedit

Hey, let's make a list of all of my books...


ls -r $HOME/books/* > booklist.txt

that's the stuff...:grin:

kellemes
January 14th, 2008, 11:09 AM
you can run the latest version of Ubuntu without having to upgrade your hardware.


Depends on the hardware you're having obviously..
Ubuntu is getting more resource-hungry every release. Bug one tells you the way Ubuntu is going.

Anyway,, for me the coolest thing is being able to compile my own kernel.

shad0w_walker
January 14th, 2008, 02:28 PM
Ubuntu might be getting more resource hungry but it's still alot less hungry than Microsofts offerings. Also, if you have a lower end system but what the upto date stuff there is always xubuntu/fluxbuntu/probably others I'm not aware of

dgray_from_dc
January 14th, 2008, 02:39 PM
Run a PC, error free, for months on end.

Set up complex server environments without expensive training, certifications & software.

Circus-Killer
January 14th, 2008, 02:44 PM
three things i can do in ubuntu that i couldnt do in windows:

1) update every single program on my machine with a single command
2) download the latest version of my OS for free
3) make fun of windows users

janiskr
January 14th, 2008, 03:16 PM
the best and coolest thing about ubuntu is - when i set up workplace that uses ubuntu i set it up, set up permissions, set up updates and forget about that workplace until hardware failure (usually 2 - 3 years, if setup was done on a older hardware, then 1 year or so) when system crashes i can replace HDD in a new shiny box and laborer is back on track and can continue working, so downtime is 15 - 20 minutes and everything is as usual :) as HDDs work for 4 - 6 years.

as i have SMART enabled everywhere i also get to know when system HDD is going to fail and before that i can clone (dd, cat or whatever) and just replace hard drive and forget about that for years.

for users - they migrate their system, change complete configuration of their PC as it was before crash.

also i have several windows boxes in office - if something fails - it is nightmare - downtime - 4 - 6 hours. That is completely useless.

Jose Catre-Vandis
January 14th, 2008, 07:27 PM
I have enjoyed reading all 24 pages of this thread (so far...). For me, Linux was an escape from the boredom of Windows, as chance to learn a new way of doing things, and to gain a better understanding of Linux. Only in the last 18 months with Ubuntu has it been much more possible to "move over", but it requires the will and determination (sometimes of a saint) to make that move. Happily I have achieved that, and only turn to XP or Vista when my work requires it, in order to stay compatible for others. I have thought long and hard about the cool things I can do on Linux I can't do on Windows:

* The mouse "scrolly" thing in all windows, regardless of pane or focus
(this is most noticeable when returning to Windows and using Explorer)

* free - in all senses of the word

* packages and repositories

* bash scripting & the CLI
(the flexibility I have to control programs such a mplayer in using my TV card)

* nfs
(OK can be done in Windows to get access, but this rock solid file sharing system
(has revolutionised my file sharing and servers)

* keeping up
(although I can run Vista on my main PC, it's not clever, yet the latest version of
(Ubuntu works as well as the first one I installed (Breezy))

sicofante
January 14th, 2008, 07:52 PM
The thing is, improving document editing or accounting is almost entirely the domain of the application you are using, not the OS you run it on.
Mmmhh... That might be true for other OSes but not precisely for Linux. Any way, when pushing for an OS, what applications are available for it is as important as the OS itself (if not more important).

vexorian
January 14th, 2008, 07:59 PM
I guess the #1 is the fact that you can directly contribute with it, say it is code, suggestion, theme, or whatever. You can get to participate on it, unlike windows or OS/X in which some big company gets to make all the decisions.

The #2 is the flexibility, windows and Mac OS/X are not as flexible as Linux.

Then there are the things I like about Linux that could be done in those other OSes, but I prefer the way it is implement or the fact that it is implemented without me having to install anything else (most likely talking about multiple desktops here)

reacocard
January 15th, 2008, 03:07 AM
Mmmhh... That might be true for other OSes but not precisely for Linux. Any way, when pushing for an OS, what applications are available for it is as important as the OS itself (if not more important).

mmm, partially true. application availability is indeed OS-dependent but the question was not about the availability of said software, rather it was about linux and productivity in general.

anyway, this prompted me to thing of another cool thing about linux: being able to run applications from a completely different OS, Windows, without having to emulate the entire OS, thanks to wine.

peabody
January 15th, 2008, 07:54 AM
Ha, here's a functionality that I don't think windows has...fuse. The ability to mount filesystems in user space. There are some snazzy apps written for fuse, including turning your gmail account into a file system! Here's a list:

http://fuse.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/FileSystems

Can't say as I've heard of something similar for windows or Mac OS X for that matter.

emshains
January 17th, 2008, 10:51 PM
1. My ancient 500mhz 320 mb ram and a primitive 64 geforce 2 (pro) will work 200% faster than it would run on windows XP, but yet i can have the same visual and system performence as it would run on windows with a decent machine!
2. Need a program ? SYNAPTIC!
3. To do a thing on ubuntu with 500mhz(320ram) is as fast as windows on 2.0ghz and 1gb ram....
4. Even my mom could install it and use it with no worries at all!
5.Update system is perfect!
6.Squeezing the last bits of life out of a modern classics video card!
7.No spywere, adware, moleware and viruses alike! (windows is dumb you can get infected while updating your system)
8.Its free and gives you the taste of freedom in my corrupted country!
9. If you have a problem just get into theese massive linux forums!

The coolest thing would be hmmmmm.....

Personalization and actually the 2nd coolest thing would be just working on it, i mean it is faster, ergonomical and more easy to use than the old windwos.
And maybe the third coolest thing for me could be , that i can browse my ipods song and copy them to pc and back, perform single song syncs without deleting other stuff!



Cant say anything about macs and their OS, because I havent really worked with them long enough thou.

Pauly Psychotic
January 20th, 2008, 08:28 AM
1. Free OS, Free Upgrades without spending $300 or more. No Licensing Fees.
2. I can copy and redistribute to my friends legally.
3. OpenOffice for writing my stories and is compatible with MS Word.
4. Gimp I like a lot better than Photoshop and it is free.
5. My computer has ran easily twice as faster than Windows XP and no more worries about scanning for viruses, malware, adware, spyware.
6. No more defragging! That was my most pet peve about Windows!

PS: I only keep Windows XP so my wife can play Sim City 3000 :lolflag:
I shudder everytime using Windows XP at my work thinking how unstable it is always having to reboot due to too many programs running.

shad0w_walker
January 20th, 2008, 10:06 AM
You know there is a Linux port of simcity 3000? I'm not sure where you can grab a copy but it exists and only requires a little tweak to get it up and running on the 2.6 kernel

http://wiki.linuxquestions.org/wiki/Simcity_3000

Tweak and link to update for the game on 2.6 kernel

Gigamo
January 20th, 2008, 10:09 AM
Might not really be "cool", but I'd have to say WORKSPACES!

I feel isolated every time I get back to a windows PC just because of that. It's so ******* handy and convenient.

rsambuca
January 20th, 2008, 10:59 PM
1. Free OS, Free Upgrades without spending $300 or more. No Licensing Fees.
2. I can copy and redistribute to my friends legally.
3. OpenOffice for writing my stories and is compatible with MS Word.
4. Gimp I like a lot better than Photoshop and it is free.
5. My computer has ran easily twice as faster than Windows XP and no more worries about scanning for viruses, malware, adware, spyware.
6. No more defragging! That was my most pet peve about Windows!

PS: I only keep Windows XP so my wife can play Sim City 3000 :lolflag:
I shudder everytime using Windows XP at my work thinking how unstable it is always having to reboot due to too many programs running.
Just to be fair here, OpenOffice and Gimp are also available for Windows.

aBitLater
January 20th, 2008, 11:09 PM
Something I can do in Linux that I can't do in other Operating Systems:

After rebooting, I can actually *use* my computer before all the memory-hog anti-virus software finishes loading

To be fair, I don't use anti-virus in Linux hehehe :)

corney91
January 20th, 2008, 11:23 PM
Might not really be "cool", but I'd have to say WORKSPACES!

I feel isolated every time I get back to a windows PC just because of that. It's so ******* handy and convenient.

Something I can do in Linux that I can't do in other Operating Systems:

After rebooting, I can actually *use* my computer before all the memory-hog anti-virus software finishes loading

To be fair, I don't use anti-virus in Linux hehehe :)
Both of these are probably my main reasons for using linux. Also the speed, stability, and, of course, Compiz making the desktop 'come alive.'

Anduu
January 21st, 2008, 05:22 AM
Reboot?What is this reboot of which you speak?

Seriously tho...If I feel things might be slowing up a bit...which happens very rarely mind you...I just do a Ctrl+Alt+Backspace and 5 seconds later a fresh Desktop :p

benthegreat
January 31st, 2008, 11:11 PM
spend a month of just suspending my sessions, without the system slowing at all! Granted I don't know whats this like in mac, Ive always liked OSX, but why pay for Linux!, but I know windows grounds to a halt after about a week of suspending.