PDA

View Full Version : Building your own rigs?



Cloudy
March 15th, 2007, 11:12 PM
I was just wondering how many people here built their own, how much it cost them, and if they went ground-up or if they started from a barebones system (like the ones on Newegg and Tigerdirect).

I'm weighing the idea of building my own rig, but I want to hear some stories first. And I need to find a job so I can afford the components. >_>

christhemonkey
March 15th, 2007, 11:18 PM
Built a couple of computers for me and my friends in the past.

The first time we built one we had another friend who had built one before help us but all the ones after were on our tods.
We always found it a breeze building them from ground up.

We also havent built any together for a few years now, but back then it cost about 250-400 depending on how good you wanted the box to end up (an whether u included any peripherals)

ahaslam
March 15th, 2007, 11:29 PM
Ground up, costing 750 - modest spec but great quality, allowing massive overclocks & future upgrades ;)

This was my first build & it only took 3 hours, so it was no inconvenience & I didn't have to remove windows ;)

The problems with pre built rigs are quality & expansion, they often only have the bare essentials for that particular spec - upgrades can be costly & overclocking limited.

Whatever you decide, go for the Intel Core 2 Duo :)

Cloudy
March 15th, 2007, 11:36 PM
Ground up, costing 750 - modest spec but great quality, allowing massive overclocks & future upgrades ;)

This was my first build & it only took 3 hours, so it was no inconvenience & I didn't have to remove windows ;)

The problems with pre built rigs are quality & expansion, they often only have the bare essentials for that particular spec - upgrades can be costly & overclocking limited.

Whatever you decide, go for the Intel Core 2 Duo :)

That's about $1500 USD, isn't it?

ahaslam
March 15th, 2007, 11:38 PM
Probably just a little less, but I am in rip-off Britain & the rig kicks *** ;)

PS. with my OC's, an equivalent retail rig would be well over a grand ;)

PPS. This includes everything, from the mouse to the monitor.

Cloudy
March 15th, 2007, 11:47 PM
Ooh.. well, for what it's worth I already have something like 3 keyboards, 3 meeces and another monitor in my closet. >_>

ahaslam
March 15th, 2007, 11:59 PM
And all that cost me about 200, so you're off to a good start ;)

hardyn
March 16th, 2007, 12:06 AM
in my experience, building ground up will generally cost more and get manuf. warranty only.

in canada - the whitebox capital of the planet (most people do not have name branded desktops)... the computer store at the end of the block is usually your best bet... they usually sell kits, like dell, a base model and with whatever upgrades, they assemble. this gives you a 3year inhouse warranty, and generally a pretty agressive pricing.

SishGupta
March 16th, 2007, 12:49 AM
in my experience, building ground up will generally cost more and get manuf. warranty only.

in canada - the whitebox capital of the planet (most people do not have name branded desktops)... the computer store at the end of the block is usually your best bet... they usually sell kits, like dell, a base model and with whatever upgrades, they assemble. this gives you a 3year inhouse warranty, and generally a pretty agressive pricing.

I also hail from this frosty motherland and I (mostly) agree.
One of the nice things here is that there are tons of immigrant mom and pop stores. The advantage here is that the price is very negotiable due to it being up to the owner how much the machine will sell for. Also immigrants seem to be very willing to negotiate. I think it is a cultural thing. The flipside of this is that you need to be wary of the swindling immigrant. Some guys come here thinking we are dumb and they might try to rip you off. This isn't an immigrant thing so much as a human thing, but you see it more in immigrants for some reason.
Also if you are brown buy from a brown guy, if you are chinese try to buy from a chinese guy. Immigrants also seem to love people their own race a lot and will cut extra deals.

If you go in, have a list of the parts you want before you go in and pay in cash the owner will love you and if you tell him how much you are looking to spend you have a high probability of the owner giving it to you for that price as long as it is reasonable.

Another reason deals are easily cut at mom and pop stores is because there is an insane amount of compeition. If you have access to the college and spadina area check out the plethora of PC shops there. If one won't cut you a deal, literally you can go next door and try again.

Building from scratch can result in comparable prices but at a different cost of time and you might also screw something up. I build from scratch because I think it is fun and screwing things up and troubleshooting is a good thursday night in to me.

DONT BUY MDG! IMO they take advantage of the lack of understanding of the avg joe and sell them little for too much.

If you are canadian and want to buy parts online unfortunately you are practically limited to canada computers and NCIX. American stores like newegg dont ship to canada because of tarriffs.

Please no one misconstrue my words for racism/prejudice. My father was an immigrant and many canadian immigrants are some of our best citizens.

hardyn
March 16th, 2007, 01:31 AM
I cant speak for the T.dot... but on the west coast here there are quite a number of big retailers in addtion to the ubiquitous 3 computer stores per block...

ncix.com (online and store front)
anitec.ca (online and showroom)
a-power.com (online and storefront, canada only)
frontierpc.com (online and storefront)

this doesn't help our poster... but readers it might...

hod139
March 16th, 2007, 01:38 AM
I trust the System Guides (http://arstechnica.com/guides.ars) provided by arstechnica