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drfalkor
March 2nd, 2007, 12:55 PM
I read that photoshop is gonna be for free at the internett, that means that we ubuntu/linux users can use photoshop at our distro trough the browser!

here: http://news.com.com/Adobe+to+take+Photoshop+online/2100-7345_3-6163015.html?tag=nefd.lede

EDIT: hmm, I'm not sure. Download photoshop to use it on your desktop or only use it at your browser ? hmm

slimdog360
March 2nd, 2007, 01:04 PM
They would probably make people use IE. hahahahha

drfalkor
March 2nd, 2007, 01:08 PM
They would probably make people use IE. hahahahha

Well, if that happened. I know adobe is ******* with us/me :P +I'd go loco then

TJCIB
March 28th, 2008, 05:39 AM
Go check it out

https://www.photoshop.com/express/landing.html

Its got pretty much everything a novice user would need. It can't do layering and things like that, but I was fairly impressed.

It ran a little sluggish on both Ubuntu and XP. But it is nice to have that option, I will certainly use it for common tasks.

tashmooclam
March 28th, 2008, 05:44 AM
There is also picnik for online photo editing and exporting to flickr, etc. Seems pretty cool. It worked on 7.1

metalf8801
March 28th, 2008, 05:48 AM
Go check it out

https://www.photoshop.com/express/landing.html

Its got pretty much everything a novice user would need. It can't do layering and things like that, but I was fairly impressed.

It ran a little sluggish on both Ubuntu and XP. But it is nice to have that option, I will certainly use it for common tasks.

Ok but is it better then the gimp?

mrgnash
March 28th, 2008, 09:08 AM
Pfft, worthless. The GIMP can do more.

miggols99
March 28th, 2008, 11:52 AM
I thought that Adobe would be releasing Adobe Air soon for Linux...and you could get apps like Photoshop on it?

misfitpierce
March 28th, 2008, 12:04 PM
Yeah its pretty handy for on the go editing of your online album.

TJCIB
March 28th, 2008, 11:00 PM
I don't think I said it was better than Gimp.

But it is nice that they give 2GB of free storage. Its a good option, especially for someone like me who doesn't care at all about photo editing.

Gimp can be a little much if all you want to do is a simple task.

bruce89
March 28th, 2008, 11:26 PM
All your photos belong to us.

banjobacon
March 29th, 2008, 01:37 AM
Comparing it to The GIMP is unfair. While Photoshop and The GIMP are similar programs, Photoshop Express is supposed to be limited in features, as it only has the features most casual users will need, and makes these features very accessible. It's also a photo manager, which makes it more similar to programs like Picasa, F-Spot, and digiKam.

EnergySamus
March 29th, 2008, 01:41 AM
SPEAKING OF THE DEVIL...
I just signed up for it... Right before I saw this post!!!!!!:lolflag:
It works very well, and you get 2GB of memory (for your photos). It is fast, and since Linux doesn't have good photo editing software: THIS IS A MUST HAVE!!! :lolflag::lolflag::lolflag::guitar::)

bruce89
March 29th, 2008, 01:42 AM
It is fast, and since Linux doesn't have good photo editing software: THIS IS A MUST HAVE!!!

In what sense? FOSS developers write programs they want to use, or find interesting.

fedex1993
March 29th, 2008, 01:46 AM
also sure there going to have a OS restrction like CNN does

banjobacon
March 29th, 2008, 02:16 AM
also sure there going to have a OS restrction like CNN does

If you had bothered to try it out, you would have realized that is not the case.

bashveank
March 29th, 2008, 02:26 AM
It wont load on my machine. I only have a 1Mb connection, but Picnik works well.

Linuxratty
March 29th, 2008, 02:48 AM
Did you read the small print though?
http://blog.wired.com/monkeybites/2008/03/photoshop-expre.html
"but as savvy readers have pointed out, to use Express you need to agree to terms of service that appear to grant Adobe the "worldwide, royalty-free, nonexclusive, perpetual, irrevocable" right to do basically whatever it wants with your images."

I don't know about you,but I have a serious problem with the above.

banjobacon
March 29th, 2008, 03:24 AM
Did you read the small print though?
http://blog.wired.com/monkeybites/2008/03/photoshop-expre.html
"but as savvy readers have pointed out, to use Express you need to agree to terms of service that appear to grant Adobe the "worldwide, royalty-free, nonexclusive, perpetual, irrevocable" right to do basically whatever it wants with your images."

I don't know about you,but I have a serious problem with the above.

Is this really any different from how other media-sharing websites treat their users' content? The license is non-exclusive, so the copyright owner is free to license their photos to others, and only applies to pictures shared publicly.

I could do without that "irrevocable" part, though.


8 Use of Your Content. Adobe does not claim ownership of Your Content. However, with respect to Your Content that you submit or make available for inclusion on publicly accessible areas of the Services, you grant Adobe a worldwide, royalty-free, nonexclusive, perpetual, irrevocable, and fully sublicensable license to use, distribute, derive revenue or other remuneration from, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, publicly perform and publicly display such Content (in whole or in part) and to incorporate such Content into other Materials or works in any format or medium now known or later developed.

mrgnash
March 29th, 2008, 06:10 AM
SPEAKING OF THE DEVIL...
I just signed up for it... Right before I saw this post!!!!!!:lolflag:
It works very well, and you get 2GB of memory (for your photos). It is fast, and since Linux doesn't have good photo editing software: THIS IS A MUST HAVE!!! :lolflag::lolflag::lolflag::guitar::)

There is no shortage of good photo editing software on Linux. Sorry to burst your bubble there, chief.

phaed
March 29th, 2008, 06:35 AM
This is part of a larger trend. Soon everything will be available on the internet: office suites, tax software, image editing software. The whole desktop is moving online. Web mail was just the beginning.

That's why I don't understand why Evolution is being pushed so hard by Gnome developers. Does anybody use a stand alone email client anymore? I haven't for almost a decade.

mrgnash
March 29th, 2008, 06:37 AM
This is part of a larger trend. Soon everything will be available on the internet: office suites, tax software, image editing software. The whole desktop is moving online. Web mail was just the beginning.

That's why I don't understand why Evolution is being pushed so hard by Gnome developers. Does anybody use a stand alone email client anymore? I haven't for almost a decade.

I do. And I'll be resisting this trend for as long as possible. I like my software and my files to be on my computer.

loell
March 29th, 2008, 06:39 AM
anybody already mentioned splashup (http://www.splashup.com) here

give it a try, i think its better than PE

dn_desaku
March 29th, 2008, 06:44 AM
anybody already mentioned splashup (http://www.splashup.com) here

give it a try, i think its better than PE

Yes, I've been looking all over for that since I lost the link :). Px in my opinion is just a photo manager with "Photohop" slapped on to give it that glow. It's not impressive at all.

Now splashup, that awesome :) :lolflag:

phaed
March 30th, 2008, 03:48 AM
I'll be resisting this trend for as long as possible. I like my software and my files to be on my computer.

One way or another you get your email off a server. Even when you choose to delete it, who says they actually delete it immediately?

Most large organizations these days have online-only job application systems. They store your resumes and such for years (I'm applying for a job at a university where I previously worked, and they still have my application from four years ago in the system). Are you never going to apply to a job that uses such a system? You'll probably end up permanently unemployed if you don't concede.

It's a simple fact, everything is going online. The IT industry must make the process as secure and simple as possible, that's the only solution.

mrgnash
March 30th, 2008, 04:15 AM
One way or another you get your email off a server. Even when you choose to delete it, who says they actually delete it immediately?

Most large organizations these days have online-only job application systems. They store your resumes and such for years (I'm applying for a job at a university where I previously worked, and they still have my application from four years ago in the system). Are you never going to apply to a job that uses such a system? You'll probably end up permanently unemployed if you don't concede.

It's a simple fact, everything is going online. The IT industry must make the process as secure and simple as possible, that's the only solution.

I already use webct, and that's fine. I use Yahoo mail (in addition to my own POP mail), and that's fine. But I still want all my projects and so on to be stored locally, and I want to work on them with local applications. It's the only way that I feel I can have a decent amount of control. The whole reason I migrated to Linux from Windows, is that I never felt that I 'owned' anything on that system, since it was all bound up in proprietary formats, and I was only 'leasing' the software, etc. The great thing about Linux, at least for me, is the sense of being in control -- you are free to use the software however you wish. If your entire system was online, I doubt the same amount of freedom would be possible.

Mr. Picklesworth
March 30th, 2008, 04:39 AM
As mrgnash mentions, web services are all about vendor lock-in. Your ISP loves to provide you with "Free email", because it means that if you decide to use it, you're stuck with that address and thus them without a lot of extra work. Same with ISP-provided web space, and web space hosts giving out "free" domain names. It's about holding people hostage for what becomes an extension of their identity.

Given what happens on a daily basis in that space, I think people are being very naiive in expecting it not to happen elsewhere.

Further, why are people who strongly defend and encourage open source software flocking to web services which provide their automated services without any source code? (Eg: Remote freeware using the web infrastructure for front ends). I don't mind proprietary software much myself, but there are hardly any open web services.

phaed
March 30th, 2008, 08:55 PM
I completely understand your concerns. As someone pointed out earlier, use of the online Photoshop application requires that you give Adobe permission to use your work. If you're truly an open source / creative commons type of person, you wouldn't care about this to begin with. But if you do, this will increasingly become a problem. Nothing is really free. I'd like to see the ToS for Google Docs or Zoho Writer.

All that being said, while I'm a supporter of FOSS, I'm not a purist. I use proprietary Nvidia drivers, the Adobe Flash plug-in (rather than Gnash), Google Earth, and so on. If I could get iTunes to work with my iPhone, I'd use that, too. So my concerns with the shift to online computing are more about security and than ideology.