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View Full Version : Linux Kernel long term objectives



dimovich
January 18th, 2007, 08:37 PM
I wonder what new features will Linux Kernel have in like 5 or 10 years from now?

insane_alien
January 18th, 2007, 09:09 PM
5-10 years from now, hmm. it'll probably be able to emit a holographic laser show from a pentium II while making you a sandwich and a cup of tea via your homes automation systems.

jdhore
January 18th, 2007, 09:20 PM
I wonder what new features will Linux Kernel have in like 5 or 10 years from now?

i don't really think the kernel gets too many new features...just improvements in hardware support, bug fixes and stuff to make it more stable

I'd love to see built-in support for most wifi cards in the near future

Engnome
January 18th, 2007, 09:36 PM
i don't really think the kernel gets too many new features...just improvements in hardware support, bug fixes and stuff to make it more stable

I'd love to see built-in support for most wifi cards in the near future

Hmmm yeah I have to agree. The kernel is the foundation. All it has to do is provide a stable foundation. It's in higher level the really new stuff is coming.

EDIT: Found this from an rss a few days back, http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/software/soa/Torvalds_surprised_by_resilience_of_2_6_kernel/0,130061733,339273095,00.htm

euler_fan
January 18th, 2007, 09:55 PM
i don't really think the kernel gets too many new features...just improvements in hardware support, bug fixes and stuff to make it more stable

I'd love to see built-in support for most wifi cards in the near future

Especially for 64-bit architectures generally. Major ditto on the support for more wifi cards, and baring that, ndiswrapper compatibility so those of us with broadcom cards.

dimovich
January 18th, 2007, 10:20 PM
Well, take for example KVM. This is definitely not a improvement, hardware support or security fix. It's a feature! I'm talking about such features.

With hundreds of processor cores coming around for the next years, this could open the door to some exotic ideas we couldn't accomplish by now (with our "slow" machines). This will definitely unleash the master-minds behind the kernel (and Linux in general).

I mean, what kind of such features do you think will be included in the kernel (and Linux in general) in the next 5 - 10 years?

ZylGadis
January 18th, 2007, 10:47 PM
"Linux in general" is the kernel and nothing more. Even if you say the correct name - GNU/Linux, that still means (mostly) "the kernel and the multitude of console Free software tools."

You have to be more precise in order to receive adequate replies. E.g. "What new features in the Xorg server?" or "What new features in Gnome?" You get the idea.