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shanepardue
December 8th, 2006, 05:18 AM
I've been using Ubuntu for close to a year now and for the first time I
decided to give other distros a real chance and dig deep with each of the big
distros and I'm very glad I've got a distro like Ubuntu.

One of the biggest problems I had with other distros is package management.
If I wanted to install a package like "checkgmail" or even the popular "vlc
media player" I ran into dependency issues and all sorts of problems. I know
they are able to be worked around and whatnot, but it came down to, I don't
want to.

My question for this community is why do people choose other distros? I
honestly couldn't find a good reason to leave Ubuntu in any of the distros I
tried. (suse, fedora) I'm interested in your opinion. Thanks!

loell
December 8th, 2006, 05:26 AM
there are gazillion reasons, the list can go on and on, but it always boils down to "preferences".

aysiu
December 8th, 2006, 05:44 AM
Ubuntu's not perfect.

In fact, if you want to run into dependency problems, try installing GnomeSword in Edgy.

Why do people use other distros? Because each distro has a different emphasis and a different target audience. For example, some people like Flash and MP3 playback to work out-of-the-box. Would you recommend those people use Ubuntu or PCLinuxOS? Some people like a graphical point-and-click way to restore Grub to the MBR. Would you recommend those people use Ubuntu or Mepis? Some people like to be able to purchase software (like StarOffice or Crossover Office) through the package manager. Would you recommend those people use Ubuntu or Linspire? Some people like a 50 MB distro that can boot off a USB key. Would you recommend those people use Ubuntu or Damn Small Linux?

Frankly, there's not a lot, technically speaking, that Ubuntu can do that other distros can't. What makes Ubuntu stand out is its awkward position of wanting to be committed in some way to Free software and to new users. It also has an amazing support community.

po0f
December 8th, 2006, 05:45 AM
... One of the biggest problems I had with other distros is package management.
If I wanted to install a package like "checkgmail" or even the popular "vlc
media player" I ran into dependency issues and all sorts of problems. ...

PEBKAC, I never had a problem with other distros and dependency issues.

shanepardue
December 8th, 2006, 05:59 AM
That's what I wanted..just a few features people see in other distros. I
totally understand that Ubuntu isn't perfect and I know it's very far from
it. I guess it comes down to the things I look for in distros is mostly found
in Ubuntu. I believe that package manager sets Ubuntu apart from the
others as well. I didn't mean to say Ubuntu is the best or anything. I
just wanted other views on various distros. Thanks aysiu!

And to Poof..In a clean install of Fedora Core six, I was unable to
install checkgmail or VLC and that was with a few third party repos
as well. (Just one example)

FyreBrand
December 8th, 2006, 06:09 AM
Ubuntu's not perfect.

In fact, if you want to run into dependency problems, try installing GnomeSword in Edgy.

Why do people use other distros? Because each distro has a different emphasis and a different target audience. For example, some people like Flash and MP3 playback to work out-of-the-box. Would you recommend those people use Ubuntu or PCLinuxOS? Some people like a graphical point-and-click way to restore Grub to the MBR. Would you recommend those people use Ubuntu or Mepis? Some people like to be able to purchase software (like StarOffice or Crossover Office) through the package manager. Would you recommend those people use Ubuntu or Linspire? Some people like a 50 MB distro that can boot off a USB key. Would you recommend those people use Ubuntu or Damn Small Linux?

Frankly, there's not a lot, technically speaking, that Ubuntu can do that other distros can't. What makes Ubuntu stand out is its awkward position of wanting to be committed in some way to Free software and to new users. It also has an amazing support community.I think the features other distro's offer is a really good point.

I also think the one thing that has kept me using Ubuntu over looking all around is the community. I may never have my graphical grub restore utility but I know I can come here and search for the answers on the forum and if I still don't get it I can ask a question without worrying that people are going to ridicule me for being a newbie.

The community along with the development philosophy give Ubuntu a unique character that I feel is very rare.

PS: Although Mepis looked interesting it looks nowhere nearly as interesting as Ubuntu/Kubuntu. Thanks for the tip though.

aysiu
December 8th, 2006, 06:13 AM
PS: Although Mepis looked interesting it looks nowhere nearly as interesting as Ubuntu/Kubuntu. Thanks for the tip though. Funny you should say that, because--as of Mepis 6--Mepis is now based on Ubuntu and uses Ubuntu repositories.

I agree about the community, though. I like not seeing all the RTFM remarks and elitist diatribes. Ubuntu is one of the few Linux communities around that has a knowledgeable user base that is also friendly.

FyreBrand
December 8th, 2006, 06:21 AM
Yeah I saw that it is based on Ubuntu and maybe I'll put it on a spare partition, but somehow it didn't feel very homey. I'm an oddball when I make decisions about that stuff. That's part of why I used Linux in the first place after trying it. It just felt right. The way things work and all. Even though I'm a programmer and a math geek I make very illogical, intuitive decisions.

po0f
December 8th, 2006, 06:27 AM
shanepardue,

I guess my first post in this thread wasn't entirely on-topic. (I was just basing that statement off my experiences with other distros, YMMV.) :)

<contribution_to_thread>
What I love about Gentoo is the fact that it's source-based (plus, Portage is a pretty bad package manager itself, I actually prefer it over Apt due to my long familiarity with it). I wasn't a ricer, I just liked the fact that everything was configured and compiled to my tastes. With the setting of a couple of user-defined flags, I could have programs that didn't load the bloat I never used in the first place.

For example: I have an all Ogg Vorbis music collection. I compile Amarok with just Ogg Vorbis support; no mp3, no flac, no whatever.

Multiply the tiny savings you get from trimming all those libraries and it adds up. Probably not worth it in the end (I switched to Ubuntu if you haven't noticed), but I was coerced into using the command-line, which I think I am better off for. (Yes, it was a 3 year lesson on the command-line. ;))
</contribution_to_thread>

<low_blow>
Also, this helped:

CFPLAGS="-march=pentium7 -O99 --omg-optimized --fastier-math"
</low_blow>

Rodneyck
December 8th, 2006, 06:38 AM
Why not learn how to make your own Linux setup? Most distros are full of bloat, many things you will never use.

http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

-Leo-
December 8th, 2006, 06:45 AM
I use Ubuntu, but I don't really know why. Too many things don't seem to work all that well, and having to boot into Windows for any top-of-the-line game has become a little old. Also, there is an obvious lack of applications. Ubuntu, like most linux distros, is easily customizable, which is its standout feature when compared to Windows. Otherwise, I don't really see how Ubuntu, or linux, takes the cake for the best OS.

Rodneyck
December 8th, 2006, 07:59 AM
I would never consider the option of going back to Microsoft unless it was the last option on earth, and even then I would go kicking and screaming. Open source is like the best thing ever, it's all free and there is nothing locking me into any platform or application.

I understand you frustration with the gaming aspect, but that is not really Linux's fault, but profit margins based on the most popular OS. That will all change of course if more people move to Linux AND voice their frustration to the game developers.

Most of my applications work with Ubuntu, so not sure what you are talking about. I have one old TV tuner card I can't get to fully function, but it never ran that well under Windows XP. Linux still needs more work, driver related, but I was surprised the first time I tried it. It recognized most of my hardware.

It sounds like you may need to go back to Windows and give it another try. Linux is not for everyone, however, get that wallet ready. :neutral:

WalmartSniperLX
December 8th, 2006, 09:26 AM
Why not learn how to make your own Linux setup? Most distros are full of bloat, many things you will never use.

http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

Just to get my few cents out toward your original question, I thought the same exact thing. Then I decided to run Gentoo in a virtual env. because I didnt want to dual boot (Kubuntu is my primary/only os).

And WOW it hit me. Each distro is fit for different people/hardware/purposes. Ide say Ubuntu is the general purpose linux that's easy to use, yet still a bit edgy ( :P ) and completely customizable. Gentoo, however, is completely based on customization (so much to the point where you must compile everything. This is good for those who want the BEST out of their hardware).

Well anyways I think (K)(X)Ubuntu is the best distro myself just because it works and the community is the best! (That's a toast to everyone here).I still want to try Fedora/Redhat Enterprise, Suse, and even Debian just to see for myself how they run. Even so, I dont think they'll be replacing (K)Ubuntu any time soon :P

Ubuntu is for me :mrgreen: 8)

Frak
December 8th, 2006, 02:04 PM
Some people like a 50 MB distro that can boot off a USB key. Would you recommend those people use Ubuntu or Damn Small Linux?

I'm working on a distro right now that will hopefully do the same thing, I'm planning on calling it USBuntu.

So kinda like DSL vs. USBuntu

TheWizzard
December 8th, 2006, 09:26 PM
I agree about the community, though. I like not seeing all the RTFM remarks and elitist diatribes. Ubuntu is one of the few Linux communities around that has a knowledgeable user base that is also friendly.

i couldn't agree more.
the combination of a bit of bad luck and the need for a stable distro for my father drove me from red hat & fedora to kubuntu. but the community is the reason i stick with ubuntu.
a major benefit of fedora over ubuntu, though, is the backporting. in fedora everything - even complete new releases of kde - was available in the repos within 2 weeks. and typing "yum" is faster than "apt-get" or "aptitude"...