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pfeiffep
January 19th, 2016, 06:24 PM
I subscribe to CRYPTO-GRAM by Bruce Schneier and found this article captivating and scary.

"SilverPush is an Indian startup that's trying to figure out all the different computing devices you own. It embeds inaudible sounds (http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/11/beware-of-ads-that-use-inaudible-sound-to-link-your-phone-tv-tablet-and-pc/) into the webpages you read and the television commercials you watch. Software secretly embedded in your computers, tablets, and smartphones picks up the signals, and then uses cookies to transmit that information back to SilverPush. The result is that the company can track you across your different devices. It can correlate the television commercials you watch with the web searches you make. It can link the things you do on your tablet with the things you do on your work computer. <snip>"
Entire article (https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2016/01/the_internet_of.html)

QDR06VV9
January 19th, 2016, 06:58 PM
This is my favorite part..(NOT)

Cross-device tracking is the latest obsession (http://www.campaignlive.com/article/why-cross-device-tracking-latest-obsession-marketers/1361742) for Internet marketers. You probably use multiple Internet devices: your computer, your smartphone, your tablet, maybe your Internet-enabled television -- *and, increasingly, "Internet of Things" devices like smart thermostats and appliances. All of these devices are spying on you, but the different spies are largely unaware of each other. Start-up companies like SilverPush, 4Info, Drawbridge, Flurry, and Cross Screen Consultants, as well as the big players like Google, Facebook, and Yahoo, are all experimenting with different technologies to "fix" this problem.
@Google what happened to the part where we "do no evil"
I guess if it turns a profit!#?(Not Evil)

yoshii
January 19th, 2016, 07:25 PM
Yeah, I think this vendor movement is dangerous. It's certainly not a user movement since it's so invasive. Also, there is going to be an exponential increase in the amount of hacking and security issues and flaws if this junk is implemented. The USA is already in a vulnerable position having some power grids and factories connected to the internet and vulnerable to hacking and malware. This movement is only about greediness of manufacturers. It will NOT improve comfort nor convenience for most users. It's a bunch of bull.

pfeiffep
January 19th, 2016, 09:34 PM
You probably use multiple Internet devices: your computer, your smartphone, your tablet, maybe your Internet-enabled television I suspect that the ultra high frequencies discussed are not reproduced by tvs ...

The bandwidth of the LFE channel is limited to 120 Hz. The bandwidth of the other (main) channels is limited to 20 kHz. Low frequency response may extend to dc, but is more typically limited to approximately 3 Hz (–3 dB) by a dc blocking high-pass filter. Audio coding efficiency (and thus audio quality) is improved by removing dc offset from audio signals before they are encoded. from ATSC (http://atsc.org/)

sammiev
January 19th, 2016, 09:43 PM
I live in a small town and people know when someone dies 7 day before it happens. I'm use to this chit...

Habitual
January 19th, 2016, 09:52 PM
I think my Fridge and my Grocer are having an affair.

Copper Bezel
January 20th, 2016, 06:39 AM
This is my favorite part..(NOT)

@Google what happened to the part where we "do no evil"
I guess if it turns a profit!#?(Not Evil)
I doubt Google's doing anything quite so cleverly insidious, but then, they don't have to. When your e-mail, calendar, map service, default search, web browser, and phone operating system are not just all provided by the same company, but registered to a single account you created, with explicit privacy agreements that allow them to correlate your data between services ... they already have this kind of "cross-device" information. See Google Now. = o

QDR06VV9
January 20th, 2016, 05:36 PM
I think my Fridge and my Grocer are having an affair.
Those Darn Smart Fridge's, Always Talking behind our backs..:o

I doubt Google's doing anything quite so cleverly insidious,
Is this just an assumption or do you have a link..You would be surprised..(Have to be careful here on this topic;))
Regards
I think this is more of a concern truthfully http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2310473

Copper Bezel
January 20th, 2016, 08:44 PM
Schneier himself just asserts that "big players" like "Google, Facebook, and Yahoo" are, in some unspecified sense, doing cross-device tracking, while fuzzily linking it with a horrid and invasive practice by a tacky little startup. He's not linking to any sources with that accusation.

However, here (http://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2015/06/17/cross-device-conversions) is an explanation of what Google offers advertisers, explaining that, yes, they're basing it on data they already have. If that sounds obvious, I'll remind you that that's what I said in the first place.

And yes, overt malware is a larger security hole, for the person being targeted, than is a service tracking your coupon usage. I don't think anyone was saying otherwise.

QDR06VV9
January 20th, 2016, 09:02 PM
However, here (http://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2015/06/17/cross-device-conversions) is an explanation of what Google offers advertisers, explaining that, yes, they're basing it on data they already have. If that sounds obvious, I'll remind you that that's what I said in the first place.

Yes I read that in your first post.And Agree that was obvious..:D
For me that is enough said.
Kind Regards

Linuxratty
January 21st, 2016, 08:39 PM
TIOT has such potential for abuse,it's just plane scary. After dealing with computerized stoves breaking down, I got a stove with no electronic chips in it. It does not even have a clock.