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View Full Version : Italy is moving to open source



Welly Wu
September 22nd, 2015, 12:59 PM
1. http://www.zdnet.com/article/innovating-in-a-time-of-budget-cuts-why-the-city-of-bari-swapped-microsoft-for-open-source/

It seems that parts of Italy are realizing the cost savings and the ease of which to switch from Microsoft Office to LibreOffice. One can hope that they switch from Microsoft Windows to GNU/Linux in future years ahead.

iulian X
September 22nd, 2015, 01:19 PM
Italy puts Free Software first in public sector ( 2014-01-14 ): http://fsfe.org/news/2014/news-20140116-01.en.html

http://www.agid.gov.it/sites/default/files/linee_guida/circolare_agid_63-2013_linee_guida_art_68_del_cad_ver_13_b.pdf

And this happens because...


http://freesoftwarepact.eu//europarl2014/?action=liste_signataires&circonscription=15&parti=0&submit=OK
(http://freesoftwarepact.eu//europarl2014/?action=liste_signataires&circonscription=15&parti=0&submit=OK)
http://freesoftwarepact.eu - http://freesoftwarepact.eu/public/Free-Software-Pact-2014_EN.pdf

http://freesoftwarepact.eu/post/Free-Software-Pact%3A-162-signatories%2C-at-least-33-MEPs-have-signed-the-Free-Software-Pact!

http://www.april.org/en - http://www.april.org/en/introducing-april

RichardET
September 22nd, 2015, 04:26 PM
1. http://www.zdnet.com/article/innovating-in-a-time-of-budget-cuts-why-the-city-of-bari-swapped-microsoft-for-open-source/

It seems that parts of Italy are realizing the cost savings and the ease of which to switch from Microsoft Office to LibreOffice. One can hope that they switch from Microsoft Windows to GNU/Linux in future years ahead.

VMware is on both platforms - Windows & Linux and it is not open source software, but I like it and use it, and have no plans to go FOSS with Virtualbox. Thus, if MS were to create MS Office for Linux, would you still promote your same argument?

mystics
September 22nd, 2015, 09:05 PM
Thus, if MS were to create MS Office for Linux, would you still promote your same argument?

Not speaking for Welly Wu, but I would say that, in general, Linux users will likely still call for the replacement of Microsoft Office with LibreOffice everywhere that they can. Microsoft still has a long way to go before they're no longer viewed as Public Enemy No. 1 to many people, let alone getting people to start considering their own office suite over one of the most loved applications on Linux.

Welly Wu
September 23rd, 2015, 12:08 AM
No, I would not. Microsoft Office is not F/OSS technology, but if Microsoft Corporation were to port it to GNU/Linux, then I would download and install it in the latest Ubuntu 64 bit LTS GNU/Linux distribution in a heartbeat. I wish the Italians good luck.

monkeybrain20122
September 23rd, 2015, 09:27 AM
..but I would say that, in general, Linux users will likely still call for the replacement of Microsoft Office with LibreOffice everywhere that they can. Microsoft still has a long way to go before they're no longer viewed as Public Enemy No. 1 to many people..

Not just that. MSO formats are closed whether it runs on Linux or not. To use it is to perpetuate these formats and contribute to MSO's monopoly. For the same reason I wouldn't even use KingSoft.

BTW it is not like many home users actually need MSO anyway. Many Windows users have it just because they can download from torrents. They can easily do without if they have to pay. I know many Windows users, all have MSO but only ONE person actually paid for it, interestingly she is the only person having a hard time getting it to work because of activation,--and LO would have been more than enough for her needs.

To stay on topics, kudos to the Italy, the land of friendly people, pasta, cheese and open source. :) Hope more countries follow the example.

fkkroundabout
September 25th, 2015, 03:43 PM
curiously kingsoft/WPS office is more popular than MS 'word' in china, despite the fact that piracy of windows is largely common there - microsoft said many years ago they made more money from the netherlands than china - and that microsoft office is not banned in china, unlike many internet companies, which have domestic made equivalents for search etc. too

but yeah it is surprising libreoffice is not more popular all over the world - i think the large majority of owners of microsoft office will only ever use 'word' and the difference between librewriter and 'word' is minimal, or libreimpress vs powerpoint, compared to the larger differences between using linux and windows. so i can only assume it is an effect of microsoft's monopoly, advertising, and bundling with more unique software - i have read of people saying the difference between librecalc and excel is larger, for example, and i can imagine macro incompatibility causing a mess, though i do not have the personal experience to vouch for this

but there have been some shifts in the western world ever since google released their basic online office suite. microsoft and libreoffice have since followed suit with their own, but i don't use any kind of office software enough to have used the last two

NathanRodriguez
September 27th, 2015, 01:08 AM
Thought Italian citizenship was going free... :)

Welly Wu
September 27th, 2015, 01:13 AM
I also think it is an issue of awareness and getting management to buy into LibreOffice. The main problem is inertia with Microsoft Office and also the concern for compatibility with older government documents when switching to LibreOffice. Not every country in the world can switch overnight to LibreOffice nor should they do so. The other problem is the cost of transitioning away from Microsoft Office and maintaining daily operations along with LibreOffice patches and updates over time. Remember, if Italy still uses Microsoft Windows on some of their PCs and they switch to LibreOffice, then it requires that additional steps be taken to keep it up to date outside of Microsoft Windows Update Service which takes care of Office updates automatically each Microsoft Patch Tuesdays in consecutive months. Finally, I think that when governments are forced to cut costs and save money by switching to F/OSS technologies that is not the ideal set of circumstances in which to do so.

Governments value stability and the ability to provide services to their citizens along with accountability. This bureaucracy leads to inertia and it stagnates innovation in the public sector. I know that other foreign governments are looking at Munich, Germany and Italy as role models and case studies to make their own pitch to switch to F/OSS technologies, but wealthier governments and countries like the United States are not chomping at the bit to adopt LibreOffice especially given the Microsoft lobbying and politics in the US Congress.