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newbie2
July 25th, 2006, 05:12 PM
"My interpretation of that is that our documentation sucks so badly that people have to search a lot..." jokes Shuttleworth.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/07/25/ubuntu_goes_mainstream/
:mrgreen:

mips
July 25th, 2006, 05:22 PM
The documentation does suck when compared to some other distros.

Jucato
July 25th, 2006, 05:35 PM
That quote can be taken out of context, when not viewed with the preceding paragraphs:



Ubuntu is now receiving more than half as many searches as Vista, which would certainly be impressive if it translated directly to the user base. But, of course, life isn't that simple.

...

Google Trends is particularly unscientific. Many of those Vista searchers may be looking for beautiful views, and the Ubuntu seekers may be investigating the founding principles of post-apartheid South Africa.


But yeah, documentation in Ubuntu is, in some ways, less corporate-friendly, in that most documents come from wikis, community submitted tips/tricks, and the forums. But being a community-driven distro, it's not surprising. Still, there are people who would prefer a full-blown User's Manual.

And, no, I can't consider the Desktop Guides as real manual materials. They're really just guides. And some of them, AFAIK, still have some errors.

jordilin
July 25th, 2006, 05:51 PM
The documentation does suck when compared to some other distros.

But these other distros don't have such a powerful site like ubuntuforums.org, where you can find your question answered within minutes. In any case, whatever you wanna do with Ubuntu can be found in generic linux docs such as tldp.org. :-D

Jucato
July 25th, 2006, 05:56 PM
But these other distros, don't have such a powerful site like ubuntuforums.org, where you can't find your question answered within minutes. In any case, whatever you wanna do with Ubuntu can be found in generic linux docs such as tldp.org. :-D

But then again, not all people who would want the power and ease of use of Ubuntu would have the luxury to always be online to browse documentation, ask for help on the forums/IRC/etc. Of course, Canonical is offering commercial support, but sometimes that's not even enough. A manual is always a good thing to have. That's why I think some people still buy Red Hat or Novell or Linspire, because of the "professional" support that they offer, which includes commercial support, documentation/manuals, and more CDs.

jordilin
July 25th, 2006, 06:10 PM
That's why I think some people still buy Red Hat or Novell or Linspire, because of the "professional" support that they offer, which includes commercial support, documentation/manuals, and more CDs.

Support works in businesses, but for home (normal) users who just want to use some linux distro, Ubuntu is a perfect professional choice. Linux is all about searching and investigating and it requires time to learn, but when we talk about companies that are betting their house, professional support is vital. But for home users, I don't think so.

aysiu
July 25th, 2006, 06:21 PM
I think people are getting it--most of the good Ubuntu documentation is user-created and spread out all over the place.

The official, centralized documentation isn't all that good... and even that I think is user-created and not made by Canonical employees. I could be wrong.

bruce89
July 25th, 2006, 07:13 PM
I think people are getting it--most of the good Ubuntu documentation is user-created and spread out all over the place.

The official, centralized documentation isn't all that good... and even that I think is user-created and not made by Canonical employees. I could be wrong.
No, you are not wrong here - https://help.ubuntu.com/community, but the official documentation team seems to be mixed - https://launchpad.net/people/ubuntu-doc. I am not sure if all of these people are Canonical employees, but I know some are. These people produce the documentation about Ubuntu in Ubuntu itself, which is also available here (https://help.ubuntu.com/6.06/).