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lilo346
January 4th, 2014, 12:09 PM
Hi, i'm thinking of starting to teach a computer business class locally for some extra cash. If i'm charging 50 bucks or lower for the class, what do you all think should be taught for this type of class?

Also, i want to start advertising my web design skills but im not sure how. Any suggestions?

Thank you so much!!!!!

bashiergui
January 5th, 2014, 04:22 PM
Also, i want to start advertising my web design skills but im not sure how. Any suggestions?
You mean in addition to the web site you build demonstrating all your design skills?

lilo346
January 5th, 2014, 09:02 PM
Yes, how are people gonna find the website without more advertising?

Habitual
January 5th, 2014, 11:50 PM
Hi, i'm thinking of starting to teach a computer business class locally for some extra cash. If i'm charging 50 bucks or lower for the class, what do you all think should be taught for this type of class?

How about 'computer business'?

bashiergui
January 6th, 2014, 12:49 AM
Yes, how are people gonna find the website without more advertising?
You create a good-looking email and then send it to everyone in your contact list. Tell them that they will receive 10% off your services if they refer someone. Send that out a few times a year, don't spam them.

Then do blog posts on your beautifully-designed website where you give little tutorials on basic computer maintenance or whatever- something that would be valuable to your customers. Do weekly posts or something periodic. Post links & teasers to the website on twitter, facebook, g+, linkedin, etc. Connect with everyone you can on all social media.

Advertise in Craig's list & local news websites.

IMO advertising only works if you commit fully to it, have a long-term plan, and do it consistently.

lilo346
January 6th, 2014, 03:48 AM
Im doing that already lol guess that i need to be patient

lilo346
January 6th, 2014, 05:20 AM
whoops that should say computer basics

lilo346
January 6th, 2014, 05:21 AM
How about 'computer business'?


That should say basics not business sorry

mastablasta
January 6th, 2014, 02:12 PM
IMO advertising only works if you commit fully to it, have a long-term plan, and do it consistently.

true.

and they say advertising/marketing is easy ;-)

but simple algorythm is something like:
you need to select your target audience then select communications chanel that will deliver the message to that audience. then you create the message that is propperly encoded so it can be easilly decoded by the audience. hopefully if all is done right they will get the message and since you hit the target they will send you a feedback (come to you class, contact you...)

the promo email advise seems good to me but you have to make sure oyu hit the correct target that the classes will interest them. or at least big enough percentage of them.

sandyd
January 6th, 2014, 02:17 PM
You create a good-looking email and then send it to everyone in your contact list. Tell them that they will receive 10% off your services if they refer someone. Send that out a few times a year, don't spam them.

Then do blog posts on your beautifully-designed website where you give little tutorials on basic computer maintenance or whatever- something that would be valuable to your customers. Do weekly posts or something periodic. Post links & teasers to the website on twitter, facebook, g+, linkedin, etc. Connect with everyone you can on all social media.

Advertise in Craig's list & local news websites.

IMO advertising only works if you commit fully to it, have a long-term plan, and do it consistently.
This is one thing FB is food for
Create a FB page as well, post the coupons on it, and invite all your friends on it, then their friends will see as well

lykwydchykyn
January 6th, 2014, 04:43 PM
Hi, i'm thinking of starting to teach a computer [basics] class locally for some extra cash. If i'm charging 50 bucks or lower for the class, what do you all think should be taught for this type of class?


Depends on your target demographic. They do a class here at the public library, mostly attended by older people with no computer experience. They talk about things like how to turn on, log in, use the mouse, open a web browser, create an email account, etc.

If you're teaching people who already have experience *using* a computer, you may be better off going into some depth about how computers actually work, how to fix common problems, etc.

Sometimes it's useful to get a couple of those "computers for dummies" type books and just skim through the table of contents to get a basic outline. It's easy to forget some things that people really need to know.