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aytuggurbuz
December 5th, 2013, 09:52 PM
I feel one learns a programming language the best by working with it.

There are some programming books that use this idea, by including exercises at the end of each chapter. I find that I enjoy this kind of books a lot more, and I get to a productive level much faster than I would if I just read the book and only tried certain parts on the computer.

I am interested in the names of these books, no matter which language. I am a Software Engineering student and adding a language to my portfolio only makes me a better engineer. Please name here the books you know which contain exercises at the end of chapters or even books consisting only of exercises! I will be checking them all.

Thanks!

MG&TL
December 5th, 2013, 11:52 PM
Which languages do you already know? Almost all programming books (in my experience) do this, so there's easily a few thousand which fit your criteria - we need to narrow it down a bit. Are you interested in any particular language?

aytuggurbuz
December 6th, 2013, 12:18 AM
Oops, sorry, I forgot to mention the languages I am familiar with. I know some C, C++, C#, VB .NET, Java, Python, Ruby, PHP... I am mainly interested in modern and new languages. But if the book and the language itself are interesting enough, I might consider just about any kind of language. Please give some ideas :)

trent.josephsen
December 6th, 2013, 12:57 AM
The best one in my opinion is Learning Perl, but I see you already mentioned that one in your other post.

Other books with exercises that I did (some of) and learned from are The C Programming Language and any of O'Reilly's Head First series (which are also worth checking out for other reasons).

TAOCP has exercises as well, or that's the rumor, but I've never read it.

aytuggurbuz
December 6th, 2013, 12:53 PM
I have read some of the K&R book, and I think it teaches the basics well. However it doesn't talk about stuff like data structures and libraries. Like I said I would read it, but it only talks about basics so it wouldn't teach me much.

Are Head First books good? I thought they were fun-oriented at the first sight. Not that it is a bad thing, but I feel they only touch the basics in an enjoyable way. Which of them did you read?

What is "TAOCP"? Never heard of it.

r-senior
December 6th, 2013, 02:25 PM
What is "TAOCP"? Never heard of it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Art_of_Computer_Programming

MG&TL
December 6th, 2013, 06:13 PM
SICP (http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/full-text/book/book.html) is (IMO) really good, although aimed more at computer science rather than programming. It teaches Scheme, an academically-focussed Lisp dialect.

trent.josephsen
December 7th, 2013, 12:24 AM
I have read some of the K&R book, and I think it teaches the basics well. However it doesn't talk about stuff like data structures and libraries. Like I said I would read it, but it only talks about basics so it wouldn't teach me much.
Yeah, it's really a book written for people who already know how to program, and just want to learn C (as evidenced by its frequent references to Pascal and Fortran for comparison). Libraries would be out of scope. There are two whole chapters on data structures, though, so I think that criticism is unfair.


Are Head First books good? I thought they were fun-oriented at the first sight. Not that it is a bad thing, but I feel they only touch the basics in an enjoyable way. Which of them did you read?

Head First HTML is the only one I own, but I've read (parts of) Head First Programming, Python, and Design Patterns as well as bits and pieces of some others (shameless plug: IEEE Computer Society members get access to Safari Books Online). "Touch the basics in an enjoyable way" is not too far from the truth, but I still feel they're excellent books; you obviously can't learn everything from books alone, but Head First books will generally give you everything you need to get started.

aytuggurbuz
December 7th, 2013, 01:02 PM
Thanks everyone for the replies, I will try to check out these books!

de Horse
December 15th, 2013, 06:06 AM
Two recommendations:

For python- I can't recommend Learn Python the Hard Way enough. It's clear, succinct, and has numerous exercises. It's definitely not an in-depth book, but to teach yourself the basics, with lots of exercises, for free, it's the best way I found. http://learnpythonthehardway.org/book/

for C- while the author of the above has a book for c, i prefer jumping into C++. I am currently making my way through it and am quite satisfied.