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View Full Version : Could Ubuntu save RIM?



cptrohn
September 25th, 2013, 10:57 PM
If they partnered up to provide phones with Ubuntu installed?

kostkon
September 25th, 2013, 11:44 PM
Too late for that (it's called Blackberry now actually, the RIM name is obsolete). They didn't use Android, which could have made a huge difference in sales, and decided to replace their old OS with a new one (albeit a very good one, real time OS, but it doesn't matter now) for their latest smartphones, what makes you think they would choose Touch now?

PJs Ronin
September 26th, 2013, 04:07 AM
Technology is a cruel mistress. If you don't have an edge you quickly become passť and fade into a memory. The only thing left in Blackberry is some patents.

mJayk
September 28th, 2013, 02:01 PM
Too late for that (it's called Blackberry now actually, the RIM name is obsolete). They didn't use Android, which could have made a huge difference in sales, and decided to replace their old OS with a new one (albeit a very good one, real time OS, but it doesn't matter now) for their latest smartphones, what makes you think they would choose Touch now?

http://www.rim.com/index_na.shtml
(http://www.rim.com/index_na.shtml)
RIM are a holder for bb.

But I agree BB have left it to late.

grahammechanical
September 28th, 2013, 04:50 PM
Yippee, another crowd-funding campaign!

Mark Shuttleworth might have more money than I can dream of but I doubt that he could buy Rim or even the Blackberry parts of it. Can you imagine the insults that would be hurled at him if he brought up so much as a patent out of the wreckage?

I remember Jono Bacon answering someone's question about Ubuntu producing mobile devices. The answer was: Canonical is a software company and there is no intention of making it a hardware company as well.

Regards.

cptrohn
September 29th, 2013, 12:42 AM
Yippee, another crowd-funding campaign!

Mark Shuttleworth might have more money than I can dream of but I doubt that he could buy Rim or even the Blackberry parts of it. Can you imagine the insults that would be hurled at him if he brought up so much as a patent out of the wreckage?

I remember Jono Bacon answering someone's question about Ubuntu producing mobile devices. The answer was: Canonical is a software company and there is no intention of making it a hardware company as well.

Regards.

True enough, but I also remember Shuttleworth saying they had no interest in a mobile or a tablet OS either. Things change when money is involved.

cptrohn
September 29th, 2013, 12:45 AM
Too late for that (it's called Blackberry now actually, the RIM name is obsolete). They didn't use Android, which could have made a huge difference in sales, and decided to replace their old OS with a new one (albeit a very good one, real time OS, but it doesn't matter now) for their latest smartphones, what makes you think they would choose Touch now?

Nobody is going to have to wait for them to "choose" anything. BB is going down the tubes. The only thing keeping them afloat is the encryption they offer. Somebody will buy them just for that alone.

SeijiSensei
September 29th, 2013, 05:33 PM
When CEOs began buying iPhones, the writing was on the wall for Blackberry. What made BB work was its infrastructure as much as its phones. A complete BB system included the messaging server that handled all the company's traffic to and from the phones and with the public Internet. Exchange posed one threat to that infrastructure, but the diversification of smart phones was the real killer. IT departments were faced with having to make iPhone-carrying executives happy, and that meant moving away from the Blackberry platform.

I don't see anything that could result in a resurgent Blackberry. The putative buyers are talking about the value of RIM's patents, but I doubt they have much that makes the multi-billion dollar figures (http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/09/23/blackberry-reaches-4-7-billion-takeover-deal/) being mooted a worthwhile investment.

aysiu
September 29th, 2013, 07:55 PM
Last year, my company had about ten Blackberry users. This year, everyone has either an iPhone, an Android phone, or a Windows phone. No one has a Blackberry.

cptrohn
September 29th, 2013, 10:43 PM
When CEOs began buying iPhones, the writing was on the wall for Blackberry. What made BB work was its infrastructure as much as its phones. A complete BB system included the messaging server that handled all the company's traffic to and from the phones and with the public Internet. Exchange posed one threat to that infrastructure, but the diversification of smart phones was the real killer. IT departments were faced with having to make iPhone-carrying executives happy, and that meant moving away from the Blackberry platform.

I don't see anything that could result in a resurgent Blackberry. The putative buyers are talking about the value of RIM's patents, but I doubt they have much that makes the multi-billion dollar figures (http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2013/09/23/blackberry-reaches-4-7-billion-takeover-deal/) being mooted a worthwhile investment.

They support the only encryption that is approved by the US DOD and other governments. Thats what makes them worth money right now.

mastablasta
September 30th, 2013, 07:16 AM
i read one of value investors plans to invest in BB. The advantage of Ubuntu on a phone would be that many office and other applciaitons already exist. it porbably wouldnt' be too difficult to port android applicaitons as well. and the way it was planned is a portable smartphone/PC. maybe it could actually work.

SeijiSensei
September 30th, 2013, 02:15 PM
They support the only encryption that is approved by the US DOD and other governments. Thats what makes them worth money right now.

The official US encryption standard is AES (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Encryption_Standard), a public algorithm. Anything beyond that violates Federal policies as promulgated by NIST and the NSA.

Are you talking about encrypted voice or encrypted messaging? For the latter you can use open public-key methods like GPG with AES256 (AES with 256-bit keys) as the algorithm.

Blackberry might have packaged these things together in a way that makes them easy to administer, but the underlying technologies are all open.

64bitiso
September 30th, 2013, 09:28 PM
Ubuntu can barely save itself.

AllenGG
October 1st, 2013, 07:53 PM
Ubuntu can barely save itself.

Well, hardly. Ubuntu will be around for a long time, the "Crowdfunding" proved that.
But RIM : Blackberry, went down the tube due to poor management and very bad customer service. The arrogant attitude at RIM Park has effectively leveled the company,
but................. The company (RIM/BB) will be sold shortly, and "Fairfax Financial" has an excellent record in management and customer service.
Look closely at Canonicals' Ubuntu. Good management, and "IMHO" excellent customer service.
Ubuntu is the leader of the pack and Redhat may be doing well but Ubuntu shines.
Allen Graham
(business consultant)
E&O.E
:cool:

64bitiso
October 1st, 2013, 09:01 PM
Well, hardly. Ubuntu will be around for a long time, the "Crowdfunding" proved that.
But RIM : Blackberry, went down the tube due to poor management and very bad customer service. The arrogant attitude at RIM Park has effectively leveled the company,
but................. The company (RIM/BB) will be sold shortly, and "Fairfax Financial" has an excellent record in management and customer service.
Look closely at Canonicals' Ubuntu. Good management, and "IMHO" excellent customer service.
Ubuntu is the leader of the pack and Redhat may be doing well but Ubuntu shines.
Allen Graham
(business consultant)
E&O.E
:cool:

Ubuntu spies on its' users - fact. There's no getting around that, or getting around the appalling "Unity" rubbish.

QIII
October 1st, 2013, 09:16 PM
The fact that RMS labels it spying does not make it spying. Unity bashing is tiresome.

Back on topic, please.

64bitiso
October 1st, 2013, 09:23 PM
The fact that RMS labels it spying does not make it spying. Unity bashing is tiresome.

Back on topic, please.


Can't be bothered. I have better to do.

QIII
October 1st, 2013, 09:27 PM
If you would like the opinion of a Canonical employee, it might be best to communicate with one.

64bitiso
October 1st, 2013, 09:31 PM
If you would like the opinion of a Canonical employee, it might be best to communicate with one.

Removed comments that do not further this discussion, and yes - it was totally off-topic. No point speaking one's mind, when it is denied outright - I refuse to waste my time on such futile pursuits.

RichardET
October 2nd, 2013, 08:08 PM
I like my Z10; it's a good phone, and yes I tried Android - I don't like it. It's too bad Apple did not buy Blackberry - it would make a great Apple division.

64bitiso
October 2nd, 2013, 10:36 PM
I like my Z10; it's a good phone, and yes I tried Android - I don't like it. It's too bad Apple did not buy Blackberry - it would make a great Apple division.

If Apple bought BlackBerry, all we'd have is... a crumble. :p

pauljwells
October 2nd, 2013, 11:28 PM
or getting around the appalling "Unity" rubbish.Why not burn a few neurons learning how to use it before spouting such crap. Invest a bit of time in Unity like I have and see your productivity rocket.