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View Full Version : [ubuntu] 12.04 installation, Windows 7 on primary drive, Ubuntu on a separate drive



turbanatoruk
April 26th, 2013, 11:12 PM
I have 5 physical hard drives connected when trying to install Ubuntu in a normal dual boot system. Windows 7 Professional is the main SSD, and I'm using the standard CD installer for 12.04 during boot (no wubi).

I managed to install it fine in the past, but this time it only comes up with /dev/sde. Instead, I want the empty drive, /dev/sdd to be the chosen one.

It does detect the other drives when I chose the more advanced option, where I allocate my own partitions etc, but I'm concerned I may much things up further.

I've attached the fdisk that I noted some people use int he past to help diagnose this. If you need more, let me know.



Disk /dev/sda: 64.0 GB, 64023257088 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 7783 cylinders, total 125045424 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x5715668a

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/sda1 * 63 125017829 62508883+ 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT


Disk /dev/sdb: 1500.3 GB, 1500301910016 bytes
1 heads, 63 sectors/track, 46512336 cylinders, total 2930277168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x04678c67

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/sdb1 * 63 2930272127 1465136032+ 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT


Disk /dev/sdc: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x29d40db8

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/sdc1 63 1953520064 976760001 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT


Disk /dev/sdd: 160.0 GB, 160040803840 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders, total 312579695 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x26622661

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/sdd1 2048 312575999 156286976 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT


Disk /dev/sde: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders, total 312581808 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x26ac26ab

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/sde1 * 63 312577023 156288480+ 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

darkod
April 26th, 2013, 11:23 PM
As you can see, /dev/sdd is not empty, it has a ntfs partition spanning the whole disk. Ubuntu needs unallocated space, it doesn't install on ntfs. Even if the ntfs partition has no data on it, the disk is still allocated to it.

Open windows Disk Management and delete that partition, leave the space as unallocated.

Then start the ubuntu installer again and see if it comes up as a choice.

Usually I recommend the manual install anyway, since it gives you best control. For example, with 5 disks the bootloader might end up on a disk where you don't expect it, and the computer might keep booting windows directly. I'm not sure how the auto method decides where to install the grub2 bootloader.
In the manual option you select the disk where you want it. But that also means you need to create the ubuntu partitions youself too.

turbanatoruk
April 27th, 2013, 12:16 PM
Thanks, didn't realise it was that simple.

Had some minor issues with it not appearing in the Windows boot menu, but I then installed GRUB2, much to my chagrin. Having disabled it and used EasyBCD to get the normal Windows bootloader up and running, it's all running smoothly now. Thanks:)

Mark Phelps
April 27th, 2013, 11:59 PM
I, too, have found in the past, that the most trouble-free way of installing multiple OSs when you have multiple physical drives is to disconnect all but the target drive before you do the install. This prevents GRUB from ending up on the wrong drive, and in some cases, preventing the OS on that drive from booting.