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Matryx
February 4th, 2013, 01:53 AM
Hi guys.

I'm looking for a distro to use for my parents. Something easy for them to use. They mostly use Google and Youtube.

It's an old laptop. Here are the specs.

Toshiba P200-RT5
Intel® Core2 Duo Processor T5300 1.73GHz
Memory : 2x1 GB DDR2 (667 MHz)
160GB HD @ 5400rpm
Optical Drive : Built-in DVD Super-Multi Double Layer Drive
Graphics : Mobile Intel 945GM Express

MadmanRB
February 4th, 2013, 02:29 AM
Linux Mint is usually a good bet, especially those older folks who dont know much about computers.
If they ever used XP linux mint will come pretty natural.

swarfega
February 4th, 2013, 02:31 AM
May I suggest Kubuntu as KDE is most like Windows.

They may find the top navigation bar a bit confusing in Ubuntu.

Matryx
February 4th, 2013, 03:32 AM
Which Linux Mint? KDE? Seems like there are a lot of versions.

I'd check out Kubuntu as well.

Piggah
February 4th, 2013, 03:40 AM
My mom's been using Linux Mint for years and loves it. Mint is also what I install for anyone old or young thats new to Linux and it's always worked out great. It's quick and easy to set-up, has a good menu, and media codecs are already installed. I always stop hearing from someone after I get them going on Mint. Windows seems to be way harder to use just based on "support requests" lol.
I bought a computer for my mom this year that came with Windows 7. She used it for a while but eventually started having so much trouble with it that I just put linux mint on it, which is what was on her old computer, and she was good to go, no more issues.

llanitedave
February 4th, 2013, 03:53 AM
My wife and I recently bought her 83 year old dad a new computer, and we put Xubuntu on it. His eyes aren't too good, so we got an illuminated keyboard. We set it up with the larger fonts and icons.

He picked up on it pretty fast, and he's been having a ball with it.

MadmanRB
February 4th, 2013, 03:57 AM
Which Linux Mint? KDE? Seems like there are a lot of versions.

I'd check out Kubuntu as well.

All versions of mint are suitable really.
No difference in the end except for the default UI.
But all UI's on mint are going to be very kind to a windows user.

ikt
February 4th, 2013, 04:19 AM
I would argue that whichever OS you do choose to put them on, your help when they need it is invaluable in making sure they stick with it. Best of luck :)

mamamia88
February 4th, 2013, 05:06 AM
Debian Wheezy Xfce. Just Google the wireless card first to see how it works. The reason I suggest Debian over Ubuntu especially for your parents is that less is likely to break and have them asking you for help. Not that Ubuntu is buggy or anything it's just that debian they test stuff to death before the release it as stable where as Ubuntu is based on the Debian unstable branch which is the development version of Debian.

MadmanRB
February 4th, 2013, 05:27 AM
Debian Wheezy Xfce. Just Google the wireless card first to see how it works. The reason I suggest Debian over Ubuntu especially for your parents is that less is likely to break and have them asking you for help. Not that Ubuntu is buggy or anything it's just that debian they test stuff to death before the release it as stable where as Ubuntu is based on the Debian unstable branch which is the development version of Debian.

Eh I would not recommend debian to a total linux outsider.
Dont get me wrong, I really like debian as it is the basis for where Ubuntu comes from but it not including things like firefox and having codecs that are harder to install for the newcomer I rather have someone usae ubuntu for as unstable as it can be.

mamamia88
February 4th, 2013, 05:36 AM
Eh I would not recommend debian to a total linux outsider.
Dont get me wrong, I really like debian as it is the basis for where Ubuntu comes from but it not including things like firefox and having codecs that are harder to install for the newcomer I rather have someone usae ubuntu for as unstable as it can be.

That's weird the only thing that didn't work out of the box for me is my wifi but that's because I needed a non-free driver and debian doesn't include non free stuff by default. All I had to do is was add non-free into sources.list and download my wifi driver. As far as codecs flash is dead for the most part and they aren't developing it anymore. either use chrome or download the flash tarball and copy the .so file to /home/.mozilla/plugins and be done with it. Codecs not really a problem either. All videos work perfectly in vlc for me and when i installed my music player (clementine) it played all my mp3s without a problem. And it does include firefox it's just rebranded as iceweasel. I'm just saying in the long run you'll be better off with debian since you install it and if it works once it will continue purring along because they only update stuff if it's absolutely necessary.

MadmanRB
February 4th, 2013, 06:51 AM
Yeah but honestly I would not give debian out to older people who may not understand some of debians policies.

blackbird34
February 4th, 2013, 11:10 AM
Ubuntu (or Linux Mint) with Cinnamon.

sdowney717
February 4th, 2013, 01:27 PM
Ubuntu (or Linux Mint) with Cinnamon.

Did this for my inlaw and also adjusted the screen resolution to make the text much bigger. Cinnamon menu is tiny, hard to read, so made adjustment to font size for it. Before that he was using a magnifying lens to look at the screen.

blackbird34
February 4th, 2013, 07:04 PM
Did this for my inlaw and also adjusted the screen resolution to make the text much bigger. Cinnamon menu is tiny, hard to read, so made adjustment to font size for it. Before that he was using a magnifying lens to look at the screen.

Yes, but the good thing is that the "text scaling factor" is readily available and prominent in Cinnamon settings > Fonts.

ugm6hr
February 4th, 2013, 08:34 PM
What are they used to?
Your hardware should cope with Ubuntu / Mint Cinammon.
Just a thought... It's worth considering something 12.04-based, to ensure that they don't have to contend with serial upgrades, which may include UI changes.
My personal view is that both Cinammon and Unity were substandard on 12.04, though they are both perfectly functional.
As for what I would recommend? Xubuntu is pretty stable. My personal fave is Elementary OS, although this is strictly beta, and has no guarantee of long term support either.
Good luck.

MadmanRB
February 4th, 2013, 08:42 PM
Personally for older folks ubuntu with Unity is out of the question if you dont want to bog them down with a non familiar interface.
This is why for new users who have used XP for most of their lives its good to try one of the mints or something KDE related.

QIII
February 4th, 2013, 08:45 PM
If resources allow, you might consider virtualizing several distros/DEs and let them choose.

aysiu
February 4th, 2013, 08:51 PM
This probably isn't the answer you're looking for, since you asked about a Linux distro for a particular computer, but if the computer's primarily for Google and YouTube, I'd highly recommend a Chromebook. They can be had for as little as US$199. And if you get an Intel-based one, you can set up a fully-featured Ubuntu dual-boot (or Linux Mint or whatever).

MadmanRB
February 4th, 2013, 08:52 PM
Or use a USB stick and unetbootin.

Warren Hill
February 4th, 2013, 09:10 PM
You definitely want an LTS version to avoid the regular updates. I would go either with Ubuntu 12.04 LTS with the "Gnome Classic" desktop. Or Mint 13 with the MATE desktop.

SeijiSensei
February 4th, 2013, 09:26 PM
I'll just add that whatever you choose should be a distro you are familiar with since you'll be the one getting all the questions if something goes awry.

black veils
February 4th, 2013, 10:03 PM
i would recommend linux mint 13 xfce, or xubuntu, you can make the xfce desktop look like anything.

Warren Hill
February 4th, 2013, 10:04 PM
i'll just add that whatever you choose should be a distro you are familiar with since you'll be the one getting all the questions if something goes awry.

+1

pqwoerituytrueiwoq
February 4th, 2013, 11:18 PM
Or use a USB stick and unetbootin.
i installed grub2 to my new flash drive and have it booting all these
dban.iso
kubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso
linuxmint-14.1-cinnamon-dvd-64bit.iso
linuxmint-14.1-mate-dvd-64bit.iso
lubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso
memtest86+.bin
ubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso
ubuntu-gnome-12.10.1-desktop-amd64.iso
xubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso

http://www.pendrivelinux.com/boot-multiple-iso-from-usb-via-grub2-using-linux/
use gparted to make (flag it) the partition bootable
skip to III
here is my grub.cfg

# This grub.cfg file was created by Lance http://www.pendrivelinux.com
# Suggested Entries and the suggestor, if available, will also be noted.

set timeout=10
set default=1

menuentry "Ubuntu 12.10 Desktop 64bit" {
loopback loop /ubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso
linux (loop)/casper/vmlinuz boot=casper iso-scan/filename=/ubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso noeject noprompt splash --
initrd (loop)/casper/initrd.lz
}

menuentry "Xubuntu 12.10 Desktop 64bit" {
loopback loop /xubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso
linux (loop)/casper/vmlinuz boot=casper iso-scan/filename=/xubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso noeject noprompt splash --
initrd (loop)/casper/initrd.lz
}

menuentry "Gubuntu 12.10 Desktop 64bit" {
loopback loop /ubuntu-gnome-12.10.1-desktop-amd64.iso
linux (loop)/casper/vmlinuz boot=casper iso-scan/filename=/ubuntu-gnome-12.10.1-desktop-amd64.iso noeject noprompt splash --
initrd (loop)/casper/initrd.lz
}

menuentry "Kubuntu 12.10 Desktop 64bit" {
loopback loop /kubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso
linux (loop)/casper/vmlinuz boot=casper iso-scan/filename=/kubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso noeject noprompt splash --
initrd (loop)/casper/initrd.lz
}

menuentry "Lubuntu 12.10 Desktop 64bit" {
loopback loop /lubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso
linux (loop)/casper/vmlinuz boot=casper iso-scan/filename=/lubuntu-12.10-desktop-amd64.iso noeject noprompt splash --
initrd (loop)/casper/initrd.lz
}

menuentry "Linux Mint 14 Cinnamon 64bit" {
loopback loop /linuxmint-14.1-cinnamon-dvd-64bit.iso
linux (loop)/casper/vmlinuz file=/cdrom/preseed/mint.seed boot=casper initrd=/casper/initrd.lz iso-scan/filename=/linuxmint-14.1-cinnamon-dvd-64bit.iso noeject noprompt splash --
initrd (loop)/casper/initrd.lz
}

menuentry "Linux Mint 14 Mate 64bit" {
loopback loop /linuxmint-14.1-mate-dvd-64bit.iso
linux (loop)/casper/vmlinuz file=/cdrom/preseed/mint.seed boot=casper initrd=/casper/initrd.lz iso-scan/filename=/linuxmint-14.1-mate-dvd-64bit.iso noeject noprompt splash --
initrd (loop)/casper/initrd.lz
}

menuentry "DBAN ISO (Delete EVERYTHING)" {
loopback loop /dban.iso
linux (loop)/DBAN.BZI nuke="dwipe" iso-scan/filename=/dban.iso silent --
}

menuentry "Memtest 86+" {
linux16 /memtest86+.bin
}

# menuentry "Tinycore ISO" {
# loopback loop /tinycore.iso
# linux (loop)/boot/bzImage --
# initrd (loop)/boot/tinycore.gz
# }

# menuentry "SystemRescueCd" {
# loopback loop /systemrescuecd.iso
# linux (loop)/isolinux/rescuecd isoloop=/systemrescuecd.iso setkmap=us docache dostartx
# initrd (loop)/isolinux/initram.igz
#}

kurt18947
February 5th, 2013, 01:25 AM
I think my vote would be for Mint 13 based on 12.04. I'm using that on a Thinkpad with almost identical specs to the O.P. s machine. Core2Duo 1.5 ?Ghz. 2 GB. RAM. It's boring, just works with no drama which is what I'd want in your position. I'd think the Cinnamon desktop would be an easy transition for Windows XP users. You can even create desktop launchers on if they demand it.

craig10x
February 5th, 2013, 01:46 AM
Why not ubuntu with unity? it is very easy to use...why must it look like windows 7 ? People go into apple stores and play with macs and take a "shine" to it (even though they have always known the windows layout)...

It's just as easy (if not easier) to get accustomed to unity...especially if you tell think to think of the unity dock as a "shortcuts task bar" where they can put all their favorites apps and most used apps...and there is a simple intuitive search button on top for anything else...

Paddy Landau
February 5th, 2013, 01:59 AM
I'm not sure why nearly everybody is steering you away from standard Ubuntu (that's the one with Unity).

My wife — probably as old as your parents — is a technophobe, yet she has found Ubntu much easier to use than Windows. I have spent far less time supporting her or my children on Ubuntu than I ever did on Windows.

Put their preferred applications in the Launcher, and show them how to use the Dash. It's that easy.

If your computer is too old and slow for Ubuntu, use Lubuntu, which is specifically designed for slow computers. Lubuntu is fast.

Matryx
February 5th, 2013, 02:00 AM
My parent's are familar with Windows 7. They have Windows 7 Pro on the main laptop and the other laptop listed in the OP has no OS right now. The laptop is for their bedroom. The recovery options and disk is lost so I need something that has just Chrome and have all the codecs install to play the majority of the online media.

There's a lot of suggestions here. Thank you for that.
I'm not a linux user myself so I'm a noob at this also. I've messed around a bit but I have no idea what to do unless I'm following a tutorial. It's just the I don't want to shell out more money for Windows 7 OS since I already got them a new laptop but they still want the old laptop for their bedroom.

I need an OS with the most linux drivers. I have a wireless Logitech keyboard & mouse and it is connected to an external monitor with VGA also. Hopefully these OS already have the majority of the drivers. It would be awesome if it was just an install and works right out of the box after but I'm having doubts with that.

Matryx
February 5th, 2013, 02:13 AM
double post

MadmanRB
February 5th, 2013, 02:19 AM
Well finding a linux distro with chrome as the default browser is a litthe rough, so far only Zorin OS offers that.
But Zorin is good for long time windows users, especially those who have used windows 7.
Another good contender even if it doesnt have chrome preinstalled is Netrunner, any KDE distro will be perfect in the end but if you want codecs and everything to look nice then I highly recommend Netrunner Third edition.
I really like netrunner and am currently using it as my primary OS.

SeijiSensei
February 5th, 2013, 02:30 AM
I need an OS with the most linux drivers. I have a wireless Logitech keyboard & mouse and it is connected to an external monitor with VGA also. Hopefully these OS already have the majority of the drivers. It would be awesome if it was just an install and works right out of the box after but I'm having doubts with that.

I'm typing with a wireless Logitech keyboard and mouse right now. It works without any configuration required. (It even works in the BIOS which I found rather surprising.) Linux Mint contains the various proprietary video codecs and the like which are not distributed by default in Ubuntu (though you can get them by using "restricted-extras (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RestrictedFormats)").

Most "online media" sites like Hulu use Flash, which works fine on Linux. Netflix is a different animal; search for the threads about "netflix-desktop" here if that's a requirement. Amazon Instant requires installing the now-deprecated "hal" package, but once it's installed, Amazon Instant works fine. (You won't get HD video from Amazon using a computer for reasons that mostly have to do with limitations imposed by the studios. I watch it in HD on my PS3.) Some commercial sites still use Microsoft Silverlight which won't work with Linux at all. (Netflix uses Silverlight, too, but the developers of netflix-desktop have come up with some clever methods to get around that problem.)

Connecting over VGA is pretty much a no-brainer with most distros. You should be able to configure the video so it switches to the TV soon after booting without having to hit a keystroke like Fn-F8.

Personally I avoid Chrome since I don't like the fact that it communicates with Google all the time. The open-source Chromium browser (available in the Ubuntu repositories) is an alternative, but I use Firefox as I have for over a decade. The vast array of add-ons (https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/) for that browser make it especially appealing.

Your best bet is to burn a CD or create a USB boot device with a prospective distribution and run it in a "LiveCD" mode. You should be able to tell right away whether it does what you need.

I'll say again though that if neither you nor your parents have any Linux experience, I'm not sure that putting them on Linux is a good idea unless you're going to be around to help them work out the kinks.

Matryx
February 5th, 2013, 02:38 AM
Sorry I should have been more specific. I'm just trying to do two things at the same time so it slip my mind.

Google chrome or chronium I figured out how to install. Just getting the codecs to work for online video streaming was a pain from what I remember.

I've actually had a few distro installed on my parent's laptop. Ubuntu and Linux Mint but that was at least a year ago. Not sure how things have changed yet. I remember though I couldn't get everything working perfectly though. I remember having stay connected with the wifi and basically power management.

I'm going to try the Linuxmint-14 KDE distro and see how it goes.

llanitedave
February 5th, 2013, 02:53 AM
+1


I'll just add that whatever you choose should be a distro you are familiar with since you'll be the one getting all the questions if something goes awry.

+2. In fact, for my wife's dad, we created a separate account on my own desktop for support for him, which is set up with the same apps and the same appearance as his. That way, if he needs any help we can see exactly what he's dealing with.

craig10x
February 5th, 2013, 03:06 AM
matryx: Chrome of course, can easily be installed on ubuntu, just by downloading the deb file from the google chrome website, and saving it to your downloads, where you just right click it and select: "install with ubuntu software center"...as simple as that!

Chrome is my favorite browser, so i always do that when installing a new ubuntu... :)

And as far as codecs, well, that is real easy, the first thing to install is "ubuntu restricted extras" from the software center, and that gives you all the codecs you need, and even installs microsoft fonts...

for messenger: Pidgin for music: the excellent Rhythmbox is already pre-installed...for videos: VLC media player...these programs and others are available in the software center which is very easy to use...

Ubuntu with unity is a very attractive and easy to use linux distribution with a massive amount of support (as you can see from these forums...lol)...

Kubuntu and Linux Mint Kde (which is based on Kubuntu, actually) is nice but have to tell you, i have tried it many times and have always returned to ubuntu because actually it's simpler to use...kde (kubuntu) tends to be more like windows in that it's a bit overkill when it comes to adjustments you can do in various settings (no offense to the kde fans out there)...gnome, which is what ubuntu is based on is more simple, modular, and easier to use...

Matryx
February 5th, 2013, 03:51 AM
So far so good with Linux-Mint 14 KDE. Installing it now since everything seems to be working like it should.

Matryx
February 5th, 2013, 03:53 AM
Ubuntu with unity is a very attractive and easy to use linux distribution with a massive amount of support (as you can see from these forums...lol)...



Which Ubuntu version are you referring to?

craig10x
February 5th, 2013, 04:09 AM
Which Ubuntu version are you referring to?

The main version of ubuntu (take the tour)...by the way, the icons in the unity dock bar (or launcher as they call it) can be made a lot smaller (adjustment is in the system settings)...
http://www.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/whats-new

I would suggest you download it, burn an iso disc and run it live to get a "feel" for it...

MadmanRB
February 5th, 2013, 04:47 AM
So far so good with Linux-Mint 14 KDE. Installing it now since everything seems to be working like it should.

Linux mint KDE is pretty good, though take care as its software center and KDE dont get along timetimes

mamamia88
February 5th, 2013, 05:34 AM
+1 million to whatever one you feel most comfortable with. I still say give debian a shot though. My opinion on the matter is that if something is working things don't just break for no reason unless something new is introduced. Debian stable sticks with well tested stuff hopefully meaning a nice stable bug free system. I don't mind fixing my pc occasionally but i don't have much patience for fixing other peoples problems. So I'd give them something that will make my life easier and have them bugging me less. Like everything else in life there are trade offs. I can install ubuntu blindfolded making it the logical choice for suggesting to friends. But it might come back to haunt me because i might spend more time fixing a bug for them that may never have gotten introduced in Debian. Imho debian may have an uglier installer but it's really quite straight forward. Only minor issue is installing non-free software and drivers but enabling that is just adding 2 words to sources.list file. At the end of the day you are going to be the one fixing their problems. You probably won't run into problems with ubuntu. Imo ubuntu is like driving 5-10 mph over the speed limit during mild traffic. You probably won't run into trouble with ubuntu but you may. Debian is kinda like driving 55 on the highway with nobody else on the road. No stop lights or any other potential causes of accidents. But the unchanging nature of debian is probably better suited for someone who is doing free tech support for a friend. If it ain't broke don't fix it. But if you are willing to pay me to fix then it's a whole other story.

mastablasta
February 5th, 2013, 08:17 AM
So far so good with Linux-Mint 14 KDE. Installing it now since everything seems to be working like it should.

does it work fast enough with that graphics chip? no one mentioned that. anyway for that maschine XFCE (Xubuntu) would be better.
i am not sure what was so painfull when you had to install additional codecs. all oyu need to do is enable the rest of repositories, open the software center and install the restricted extras package. that will install the codecs.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RestrictedFormats

well many methods exist and most of them take a few seconds and then the wait for them to download and install.

kurt18947
February 5th, 2013, 02:51 PM
I've never had an issue with keyboards and mice, either wired or wireless. I do install a means to indicate caps lock and num lock status on wireless keyboards. Entering passwords on a web site can be a pain if you don't know caps lock status. I'd suggest starting with a live install, either CD/DVD or USB. If your hardware will support booting from USB hard drives, a live install with persistence enabled should do what you need. I know nothing about KDE. I tried it, had trouble with wireless connectivity and never went back. Many swear by it, I swore at it :).

I still think Mint 13 is a good choice. Cinnamon seems an easy logical desktop and it comes with most codecs already installed. I use gnome-shell as a default desktop but I install some additional packages and tweaks to get it to work like I want. The risk is that an update will cause one of those additions to misbehave. This risk doesn't bother me but it might if I were responsible for distant machines . The risk of a 'plain vanilla' install with few tweaks breaking seems small. I enable 'install security updates automatically' and have it notify about the availability of non-critical updates but don't install them automatically.

TheFu
February 5th, 2013, 03:06 PM
Hi guys.

I'm looking for a distro to use for my parents. Something easy for them to use. They mostly use Google and Youtube.

It's an old laptop. Here are the specs.

Only read the question, none of the follow up comments.

* TinyCore will be the fastest. It is small and for specific tasks, probably the best. I use it for online banking, as an example.
* Lubuntu would be my next suggestion. It is an LXDE-based Ubuntu and very light. My 82 yr old Mom loves it and used a P4 CPU for the last 3 yrs with it. Last August, the P4 motherboard stopped working, so we just swapped the HDD into a newer machine. Even though the new machine was a Core i7 with tons of RAM, Mom said "it felt just a little quicker, but not much."
* Xubuntu would be my last suggestion. It is an XFCE-based Ubuntu and heavier than the others, but still gnome2. I ran this for a period, before dropping back to LXDE.

Any if the fancier GUIs from any distro - including Ubuntu - will perform poorly on that graphics chip. Unity performs very badly on most of my machines because they do not have new GPUs or because they run inside a non-desktop virtual machine.

JayKay3OOO
February 5th, 2013, 11:03 PM
Kubuntu, but ask them what they want to do with and help them out if they need it.

If they want DVD playback install VLC and libdvdcss as follows here.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RestrictedFormats/PlayingDVDs

Install chromium-browser and they'll basically be set.

I had a few crash problems with mint running KDE, but could have been a corrupt install.

Just be on hand to help them out if they need it because I remember what it was like to fist use Linux because all the applications are meaningless to a novice.

Joli Cloud is pretty good too as the interface is idiot proof and you can't break it with some useful local applications too. It does require the net all the time and runs off an old version of ubuntu.

Matryx
February 6th, 2013, 02:00 AM
does it work fast enough with that graphics chip? no one mentioned that. anyway for that maschine XFCE (Xubuntu) would be better.
i am not sure what was so painfull when you had to install additional codecs. all oyu need to do is enable the rest of repositories, open the software center and install the restricted extras package. that will install the codecs.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RestrictedFormats

well many methods exist and most of them take a few seconds and then the wait for them to download and install.

Startup is a bit slow but it's running fine from what I can tell. Some websites I ran into the videos didn't play. I like the interface so far though.

I'm not going to change the OS too often. My parents can't handle too much different OS. They like to stick with one and learn from there.

About the restricted formats. Is the install the same for Linuxmint 14 KDE also?

SeijiSensei
February 6th, 2013, 05:36 AM
There are a few items that are unique to KDE apps, like extras for K3b to handle commercial DVDs. On a regular Kubuntu installation, you install "kubuntu-restricted-extras" instead of "ubuntu-restricted-extras". I don't know how that translates to Mint, though, as I've never used it. Vanilla Kubuntu plus the restricted extras and adobe-flashplugin fulfill most of my needs. I use smplayer for videos, which invokes mplayer as the engine. Most everything it needs is in libavcodec and libavformat which install as dependencies.

phthano
February 6th, 2013, 07:43 AM
you install "kubuntu-restricted-extras" instead of "ubuntu-restricted-extras". I don't know how that translates to Mint, though, as I've never used it.

You can just use ubuntu-restricted-extras in Mint as Mint is largely Ubuntu based.

That aside, I'd recommend Ubuntu or Mint for new users. Especially parents.

craig10x
February 6th, 2013, 08:10 AM
Yep...the main version of ubuntu with the unity launcher (dock) is nice and simple to use...they should pick it up pretty fast...kubuntu (or in your case linux mint kde which is kubuntu with linux mint modifications) looks a lot like windows, but can be rather complex and complicated...

As i mentioned, all you have to do is download it, burn an iso and run it as a live session...it will give you a nice feel for it...

I suspect you are worrying too much that it must be a form of linux that LOOKS like windows, and that is why you are gravitating towards the kde desktop...but gnome (the main ubuntu) is actually, more simple in it's layout, less confusing settings, and all-in all
simpler to use...

Take it from somebody who has spent lots of time using both...again, no offense to the kde fans...i know they have that "thing for it" (lol) ;)

mastablasta
February 6th, 2013, 09:56 AM
I suspect you are worrying too much that it must be a form of linux that LOOKS like windows, and that is why you are gravitating towards the kde desktop...but gnome (the main ubuntu) is actually, more simple in it's layout, less confusing settings, and all-in all
simpler to use...


That's true. Gnome is intentionally hiding some settings so as to not ovewhelm the users. It is very intuitive. or should i say it was. i haven't tried latest versions but from what i read there are plenty of unintuitive things there. which is also the reason why Ubuntu designed Unity. all in all for general users i think Unity is still a good option.

but one has to point out the graphics chip available here (Gnome got heavy on it's compositing or maybe because it is new not optimised yet) and also older CPU. the next closest thing to Gnome that looks and acts very much like old gnome is XFCE.

then there is also Unity 2D found in 12.04.

SeijiSensei
February 6th, 2013, 03:19 PM
You can just use ubuntu-restricted-extras in Mint as Mint is largely Ubuntu based.

Matryx said he was trying out KDE Linux Mint 14.