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View Full Version : Unlocking contract phones in USA: Illegal



Paddy Landau
February 1st, 2013, 10:38 PM
now that unlocking is illegal
Is unlocking illegal in the USA? Wow. Post it to a European unlocker (it's pretty cheap to get it unlocked).

Dragonbite
February 2nd, 2013, 04:18 AM
Is unlocking illegal in the USA? Wow. Post it to a European unlocker (it's pretty cheap to get it unlocked).

As of last Saturday, and individual is not allowed to unlock their phone without permission from their carrier.

Or something like that.

Paddy Landau
February 2nd, 2013, 01:17 PM
As of last Saturday, and individual is not allowed to unlock their phone without permission from their carrier.

Or something like that.
Outrageous. Here in the UK, they can't stop you. In fact, carriers will themselves unlock your phone if you ask, albeit usually at a cost. At least one will do it free provided you have been with them for a certain time.

pchokola
February 2nd, 2013, 01:46 PM
Outrageous.

I must tell you that I am not a big fan of carriers and their tactics, but when you get a locked phone with a carrier in the USA you are getting it at a huge discount, usually an order of magnitude cheaper, sometimes even for a penny or free, although they are making that money back many times fold in subscription fees, overage chargers, and sneaky fees. So, this law is more than fair. Also, other options were not taken away (you can still buy and use new unlocked phones). Note that jailbreaking is still legal however......for now.

Paddy Landau
February 2nd, 2013, 02:12 PM
So, this law is more than fair.
Ah, I wonder if there is a difference in the types of contracts you get. Here in the UK, once you enter into a fixed-term contract, you may not break it even if you unlock your phone and go with a different carrier. So, the carrier still makes the money.

If you purchase a phone for pay-as-you-go, you pay full price for the phone.

I would say that the law is not fair, as it infringes your rights; rather, it should be up to the carriers to decide whether or not to allow it in their contracts, making it a civil rather than a federal offence.

There is another big difference between America and Europe. In Europe, you never pay to receive a call or a text message (except for opt-in services such as sports results) the caller pays the full cost whereas in the USA, as I understand, you pay to receive calls and SMS. That's why we tend not to get spam calls on our mobiles.