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View Full Version : Do they make keyboards like this?



WinterMadness
October 26th, 2012, 04:14 AM
I always wanted a keyboard with the letters to be elevated, so that when im not looking at the keyboard, I can "feel" which key it is that im touching. Usually I can type without looking but, I always seem to make some typos, and it honestly drives me nuts, and I think my idea would solve it.

Any idea? Ive looked around but cant find anything, maybe im not using the correct terminology

MadmanRB
October 26th, 2012, 04:39 AM
Maybe Braille, but that is next to ridiculous as blind people usually dont use computers.

Mikeb85
October 26th, 2012, 04:47 AM
Most keyboards have a little line that sticks up out of the f and j keys, so you can properly set up on the 'home row'. From there touch typing should be easy...

Both my laptop and desktop keyboards have this little bump...

WinterMadness
October 26th, 2012, 05:18 AM
Most keyboards have a little line that sticks up out of the f and j keys, so you can properly set up on the 'home row'. From there touch typing should be easy...

Both my laptop and desktop keyboards have this little bump...

I dont want a little bump on two keys. I want to feel the letter/number/word(such as enter) on every single key, my keyboard does not always stay in one strict position, sometimes its slanted, it all depends on the angle of my chair at the time. nobody said anything about difficulty or ease. This is just a better way to reduce typos. I dont make any more typos than the average person, I just get more annoyed by them.

I also dont understand braille, and a lot of blind people use computers. I actually met a blind programmer.

Grenage
October 26th, 2012, 09:10 AM
Any idea? Ive looked around but cant find anything, maybe im not using the correct terminology

It's more likely that there's no market for one; nobody who touch types needs raised lettering, and people who don't touch type will look down. You'll either need to learn Braille (more than do-able), or make your own.

(or just move on)

robert shearer
October 26th, 2012, 09:21 AM
Maybe Braille, but that is next to ridiculous as blind people usually dont use computers.

So what are all the 'text to speech' screenreader apps for then...?
and Vedics for Linux or speech control for Windows...
and this section of the forums....
http://ubuntuforums.org/forumdisplay.php?f=145

but then I guess you have all your arms and legs and eyes and ears though perhaps the main cpu is not meshing with the output too well yet.

Mr. Picklesworth
October 26th, 2012, 05:32 PM
Depends on how much of an effect you want. My Das Keyboard has laser-etched lettering, so there's a slight indent. Definitely noticeable, but the letters are small so I can't say for sure whether I'd be able to tell them apart by touch. Worth a try, anyway. It's a great keyboard.

Bölvağur
October 26th, 2012, 06:03 PM
I dont want a little bump on two keys. I want to feel the letter/number/word(such as enter) on every single key
That is doable, scratch it into the keys, make it with glue or any other material that is easy to form and becomes hard, make the letters by cutting out ducktape.



This is just a better way to reduce typos.

How is that a better way?
The standard way is having a map of every key's position in your mind. Its hard to see how would this be an improvement.

CharlesA
October 26th, 2012, 06:36 PM
How is that a better way?
The standard way is having a map of every key's position in your mind. Its hard to see how would this be an improvement.

What he said. I would consider myself a touch typist, but I occasionally look at my fingers, and make typos fairly often because my brain is working faster than my fingers. :p

Keep practicing and you won't need any sort of elevated keys to figure out which key you are hitting.

FWIW: I tried learning the "home row" version of touch typing, but I could never do it. I usually just use two or three fingers and it works fine for me. It might not be "proper" and I remember getting hell about the way I type during a typing class, but it works for me, and that is what counts.

lykwydchykyn
October 26th, 2012, 07:12 PM
I would think that having hard bits sticking up on every key is going to fatigue your finger tips after a lot of typing.

Even if you don't know braille, I would imagine after a while of using a braille keyboard you'd get a feeling for which letter is which. Touch memory can be powerful.

Another option might be to get a bag of sticky foam letters you can usually find at craft/teacher stores and stick them to your keyboard. Cheap, easy on the finger tips, and probably very colorful too :).

WinterMadness
October 26th, 2012, 08:22 PM
That is doable, scratch it into the keys, make it with glue or any other material that is easy to form and becomes hard, make the letters by cutting out ducktape.


How is that a better way?
The standard way is having a map of every key's position in your mind. Its hard to see how would this be an improvement.

im not suggesting using this method to remove memorization but to supplement it, and hopefully removing a few occasional errors

Tinker Tantrum
December 16th, 2012, 09:08 PM
I'm visualizing what you are asking for in my mind and honestly: Elevated keys would drive one insane! There would be so many bumps and ridges that you would have a hard time telling where one key ended and another began. A brilliant idea, but I hardly see this as mass preference.

Jakin
December 16th, 2012, 09:24 PM
I imagine that ingraved characters would accomplish the same thing you want to feel, right?

http://oreedesign.com/products/oree-board-maple , if your into the rest of style of this keyboard :lolflag:

I sure hope they put wood sealer on these... it would look like crap from oils in our fingers...

Paqman
December 17th, 2012, 07:55 AM
blind people usually dont use computers.

They most certainly do. Technology is incredibly useful to the visually impaired.

However, specialist computing equipment for the blind can be expensive, so I'm not sure that's a good avenue for the OP to go down.

Cheesemill
December 17th, 2012, 05:18 PM
Do you know how difficult it actually is to tell apart different letters with your fingers? It's very difficult if not impossible.

This is why braille uses a specially designed system rather than just using standard letters.