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Uncle Spellbinder
October 6th, 2012, 03:33 PM
While Debian and Ubuntu (along with their respective derivatives) have been my distro of choice for many years, I've since started delving into the other side Linux. Non Debian/Ubuntu distros. I've tried quite a few over the past couple months. From the somewhat complicated (Arch, Gentoo) to the more user-friendly (Fedora, OpenSUSE).

Seems I've fallen in love with one in particular. Fuduntu (http://www.fuduntu.org/). I recently installed Fudunto 2012.4. I love that it's a rolling release. It installed quickly and operates like a champ on my 5-year old Dell Dimension E520 desktop. I've enabled Fuduntu testing, and this baby is rock solid. I've really begun to appreciate RPM. And using Yumex (Yum Extender) over the default Software Center is wonderful.

I now have Fuduntu as the primary OS on my desktop.

exploder
October 6th, 2012, 04:03 PM
I am a huge fan of PCLinuxOS. A stable rolling release that always works and a community that is like an extended family. PCLinuxOS got me to stick with Linux when I was ready to give up because of having so many hardware issues for so long. PCLinuxOS made me realize that quality did exist in Linux and it saved me from going back to Windows.I owe a huge debt to PCLinuxOS and the community.

mips
October 6th, 2012, 04:17 PM
Arch. Currently using Manjaro which is based on Arch.

forrestcupp
October 6th, 2012, 08:36 PM
I am a huge fan of PCLinuxOS. A stable rolling release that always works and a community that is like an extended family. PCLinuxOS got me to stick with Linux when I was ready to give up because of having so many hardware issues for so long. PCLinuxOS made me realize that quality did exist in Linux and it saved me from going back to Windows.I owe a huge debt to PCLinuxOS and the community.

I didn't even realize they are still active. It didn't look like they have a 64-bit version. Do you know if they do.

I read their About page, and it's kind of confusing. It says it uses APT, but then it says that their repositories have over 12,000 rpm software packages. So they're using APT with rpm's?

cariboo
October 6th, 2012, 09:11 PM
I used PCLOS before I started using Ubuntu, I still install it once in a while for nostalgia's sake. :)

sffvba[e0rt
October 6th, 2012, 09:16 PM
http://en.opensuse.org/images/c/c8/Geeko-button.svg (http://www.opensuse.org/en/)


404

Mikeb85
October 6th, 2012, 09:42 PM
SUSE here as well. I like Ubuntu's apps, compatibility, and the Unity DE, but I also like SUSE studio, build service, and I find the performance of SUSE distros to be one step ahead of Ubuntu...

Despite that though, my 2 computers are exclusively Ubuntu (12.04 and 12.10, both with Unity) right now.

mamamia88
October 6th, 2012, 11:05 PM
Arch linux is my new favorite distro period. Installed it for the first time about a month ago and i love it.

aykoola
October 6th, 2012, 11:05 PM
http://en.opensuse.org/images/c/c8/Geeko-button.svg (http://www.opensuse.org/en/)


404

+1

+ i think i'm gonna love the new Slackware

fuduntu
October 6th, 2012, 11:18 PM
http://i.imgur.com/bOmzk.png

sembagdod
October 6th, 2012, 11:40 PM
Nice one

Bachstelze
October 7th, 2012, 12:12 AM
Slackware is what I'd use if for some reason I couldn't use Debian or Ubuntu.

jrog
October 7th, 2012, 01:10 AM
I read their About page, and it's kind of confusing. It says it uses APT, but then it says that their repositories have over 12,000 rpm software packages. So they're using APT with rpm's?
Pretty much. They use APT-RPM, which is basically just APT modified to work with RPMs.

For my part, Arch is my favorite non-Deb/Ubuntu distribution right now.

angry_johnnie
October 7th, 2012, 04:23 AM
Non-Debian? Does that exist? :p

Just kidding, I have used others:

I always liked Mandriva for the looks, but I can't stand rpm/urpmi.

Other than that, I have a thing for minimal distros: DSL, Puppy, tiny core...

I still have a working tomsrtbt floppy disk. It amazes me how much stuff he was able to cram into a single floppy...

odiseo77
October 7th, 2012, 05:00 AM
OpenSuse, Fedora and Arch.

matfx
October 7th, 2012, 05:14 AM
OpenSUSE and Gentoo.

Welly Wu
October 7th, 2012, 07:29 AM
I would probably have to say for me it would be OpenSUSE 64 bit like 12.2 for now. I like the GUI for the Novell AppArmor configuration which Ubuntu lacks although you can add the Armorforge PPA for similar results. OpenSUSE is a great GNU/Linux distribution for users looking for a more up to date enterprise focused set of tools that also can become a rolling release distribution as well with the Tumbleweed repository. It's a pretty good distribution in general if you can get used to the RPM system and fewer software packages in general. This would be my distant second choice to install bare metal. I am very happy with Ubuntu 12.04.x 64 bit LTS.

Peripheral Visionary
October 7th, 2012, 11:13 AM
I haven't explored many non-Debian based distros for myself, but I looked over my friend's shoulder while he explored a few. PCLinuxOS was a favorite but I think he had some hardware issues with it. Very friendly forums and lots of support and kind to kids (read: they tolerated us, lol). If not for the hardware issue I think he would have stuck with Phoenix, the Xfce edition of PCLinuxOS.

We also looked at SalixOS, which is Slackware-based. It has super duper long-term-support because it's fully compatible with it's parent distro, but nicely simplified and adapted to "casual desktop users." What Ubuntu has done for Debian, SalixOS has done for Slackware: Bring it's parent's awesomeness to us ordinary, technically challenged mortals. It's been dubbed "an OS for lazy Slackers." It ran just great on his aging, modest hardware and was simple enough even for me. If I weren't so delighted with Xubuntu I think SalixOS would be my primary OS.

Erik1984
October 7th, 2012, 12:00 PM
I have never tried anything outside Ubuntu / Debian. With the exception of Fedora on the university but that was not my own install (student workstations had Fedora/XP dual boot) and I did not spend much time on it.

The main reason is I don't see any practical advantages in trying anything outside the *buntu family right now. Kubuntu has all the functionality I need and is light enough for this hardware (> 4 years old desktop).

SantaFe
October 7th, 2012, 02:19 PM
I found my old Red Hat 6.4 CD the other day. Hmmm where's that old 486 CTX laptop gone to. ;)

kurt18947
October 7th, 2012, 03:07 PM
I've been trying distros to use on an old laptop that for some reason doesn't like newer *buntu installers. Yes, PCLinuxOS is alive and kicking I have that on one partition. I also installed openSUSE gnome on another partition. OpenSUSE with Xfce-session-manager works pretty well, uses around 240 MB. RAM while running FireFox.

mamamia88
October 7th, 2012, 03:26 PM
I've been trying distros to use on an old laptop that for some reason doesn't like newer *buntu installers. Yes, PCLinuxOS is alive and kicking I have that on one partition. I also installed openSUSE gnome on another partition. OpenSUSE with Xfce-session-manager works pretty well, uses around 240 MB. RAM while running FireFox.

just a heads up. if you have trouble running graphical installer try the mini iso. You can install a command line only system and then sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop or kubuntu-desktop or xubuntu-desktop. Or you could even install xfce, kde,etc without the ubuntu additions.

wojox
October 7th, 2012, 03:29 PM
Why Arch Linux of course. :p

BeRoot ReBoot
October 7th, 2012, 03:54 PM
Why Arch Linux of course. :p

This, without any doubt. In its own way, it's much simpler than Ubuntu - by rejection the notion of simplicity of learning the system in favour of simplicity of the system itself.

cecilpierce
October 7th, 2012, 04:24 PM
Manjaro and Bridge work really well.

Uncle Spellbinder
October 7th, 2012, 04:32 PM
BURG? I've not heard of that. Looks very interesting.

cecilpierce
October 7th, 2012, 05:01 PM
BURG? I've not heard of that. Looks very interesting.

It looks and works better fo me then grub but the new grub has some nice themes to, I added icons for different DE's.
Dont inatsll it if you only have one drive, would not want have it not work for some reason and cause problems :p

hydn79
October 7th, 2012, 05:03 PM
My Favs...

Arch, Gentoo and Slackware

pmon
October 7th, 2012, 05:10 PM
+1 for openSUSE.

Jakin
October 7th, 2012, 05:53 PM
I like Fedora, and Solaris :)

forrestcupp
October 7th, 2012, 06:16 PM
Arch linux is my new favorite distro period. Installed it for the first time about a month ago and i love it.After the thrill of working your butt off setting it up, are there really any noticeable advantages? I know it's a rolling release, which could be considered good or bad.


http://i.imgur.com/bOmzk.png:lol: I remember when you first announced Fuduntu on here, and I didn't think you had a snowball's chance in the netherworld. But it seems like you've done a good thing, and everyone who tries it seems to love it.


This, without any doubt. In its own way, it's much simpler than Ubuntu - by rejection the notion of simplicity of learning the system in favour of simplicity of the system itself.So you're saying that Arch is simpler than Ubuntu? :lol:

mamamia88
October 7th, 2012, 07:04 PM
After the thrill of working your butt off setting it up, are there really any noticeable advantages? I know it's a rolling release, which could be considered good or bad.

:lol: I remember when you first announced Fuduntu on here, and I didn't think you had a snowball's chance in the netherworld. But it seems like you've done a good thing, and everyone who tries it seems to love it.

So you're saying that Arch is simpler than Ubuntu? :lol:

well it's not really working your butt off installing it. you just read the begginers guide and make sure you type in commands verbatim and it's simple to setup. it might not have a pretty graphic installer but it's not hard. the 2 main advantages to me is that i know nothing is installed on my computer that i don't need and that the documentation is so good. also the aur is awesome but it's only an advantage if you can't find what you need in ubuntu repos/ppas. most users probably won't need anything from it. is it worth it? depends on the hardware and the user. if you don't mind sacrificing some speed for a quicker initial install time and want everything slightly complicated to be hidden from you then use ubuntu. If you want a lean mean machine and want the peace of mind knowing that if something breaks that the answer is on the wiki somewhere then use arch. i used to think that arch was hard and then i tried it. I'm on a netbook and ubuntu seems to be getting more and more bloated. With arch i don't have to hope that canonical optimizes the os to run better on my hardware.

cwsnyder
October 7th, 2012, 07:24 PM
Since you state non-Debian as well as non-Ubuntu based Linux, my votes are for PCLinuxOS, Puppy, Tiny Core, and Slitaz. If only one vote allowed: PCLinuxOS.

Fedora/CentOS/RHEL has given me too much grief installing, OpenSUSE would give me mysterious crashes on bare metal. That is why I have basically stayed with Debian based distros like Knoppix, DSL, Debian, Ubuntu, and Mint.

fuduntu
October 7th, 2012, 10:47 PM
:lol: I remember when you first announced Fuduntu on here, and I didn't think you had a snowball's chance in the netherworld. But it seems like you've done a good thing, and everyone who tries it seems to love it.

Most everyone thought that, even I did at first, as I didn't expect anyone to use it.

There are still some out there spreading FUD about us, but fortunately we don't see that here at Ubuntu Forum. :)

We are almost two years into the project, and it's continuing to grow like crazy. I couldn't be happier with how we've come along, and the direction we are heading.

Hopefully people will continue to enjoy it! :guitar:

BeRoot ReBoot
October 8th, 2012, 01:31 AM
So you're saying that Arch is simpler than Ubuntu? :lol:

You can set it up so that the system itself is much simpler than ubuntu - ie, fewer layers of abstraction, less services running to accomplish the same thing, etc. However, no matter how hard you try, you probably couldn't get it to be as simple to learn and use as ubuntu, but that's not the kind of "simple" I'm talking about. I'd much rather have an OS that's simple to use than an OS that's simple to learn.

forrestcupp
October 8th, 2012, 01:11 PM
There are still some out there spreading FUD about us, but fortunately we don't see that here at Ubuntu Forum. :)
Well, the first 3 letters of your name are FUD. ;)


You can set it up so that the system itself is much simpler than ubuntu - ie, fewer layers of abstraction, less services running to accomplish the same thing, etc. However, no matter how hard you try, you probably couldn't get it to be as simple to learn and use as ubuntu, but that's not the kind of "simple" I'm talking about. I'd much rather have an OS that's simple to use than an OS that's simple to learn.

So you're saying that it's worth the pain in the backside to set it up because you can end up with a system that's simple to use. Arch is not as simple to learn, but after you get it all set up and learned, it's simpler to use. Is that what you're saying?

cecilpierce
October 8th, 2012, 02:31 PM
There are a few Arch DE's that are already setup pretty nice.
The first time I tried arch I gave up! Too complicated, but kept tring it and if your bored and have time to get on the forums its not as hard as you think, if I can do it anybody can...:p

GreatDanton
October 8th, 2012, 02:37 PM
http://beefymiracle.org/img/its-a-beefy-miracle.pnghttp://http://beefymiracle.org/img/its-a-beefy-miracle.png

BeRoot ReBoot
October 8th, 2012, 03:26 PM
So you're saying that it's worth the pain in the backside to set it up because you can end up with a system that's simple to use. Arch is not as simple to learn, but after you get it all set up and learned, it's simpler to use. Is that what you're saying?

You can certainly set it up to be that way, although it's still a "high-maintenance" distro compared to Ubuntu. Once you're used to how it works, it's a lot less hassle.

rhlegion
October 8th, 2012, 06:02 PM
I love Arch! yeah to the newer Linux user it might be a little tricky to install, but it's so customizable. It just feels like it is your operating system and not someone else's that you just downloaded.
It's fast
It's stable
It's how you want it
It has rolling system updates.
All the packages I've downloaded so far are very up to date!

What's not to love?

malspa
October 8th, 2012, 06:11 PM
I don't know which is my favorite -- I might change my mind tomorrow -- but the non-Debian/Ubuntu distros installed here are openSUSE, Fedora, and Sabayon. I enjoy using all three.

mamamia88
October 8th, 2012, 06:54 PM
For all those sabayon users how hard would it be to install sabayon xfce and then remove all the sabayon additions to gentoo and have a running gentoo without all the time consuming install?

Old_Grey_Wolf
October 8th, 2012, 07:32 PM
We use RHEL at work; so, for home use I install CentOS. It is just because I am familiar with it. If I was going to use an RPM bases OS for a desktop, I would find something else. RHEL and therefore CentOS have desktop software; however, that is not their main interest. They focus mainly on servers.

IWantFroyo
October 8th, 2012, 07:54 PM
For all those sabayon users how hard would it be to install sabayon xfce and then remove all the sabayon additions to gentoo and have a running gentoo without all the time consuming install?

I'm pretty sure that would beat the point of Gentoo, since Sabayon doesn't compile itself from source onto your computer (I think - I could be wrong. It's been a long time since I used Sabayon)

OT: Fedora and openSUSE are tied for me.

kazuya
October 8th, 2012, 08:06 PM
My favorite Distro is Arch-based. I love the Arch linux base and ease to maintain, coupled with Speed and pure user empowerment. The Debian-based distro crawls in comparison on same hardware regardless of Desktop environment used.

Ubuntu and Zorin are nice and still remain my favorite to recommend to totally new users to Linux.

My favorite distro and number one recommended distro for non-beginning users is BridgeLinux and/or Archbang - These are all easier install version of Archlinux. After install, they are essentially Archlinux, but with alot of the basic apps you can use to get going along with a ready- gui desktop environment.

It has been hard to use or stay with any other Distro since discovering these two distrolets.

Cheesemill
October 8th, 2012, 08:14 PM
Another big +1 for Arch.

I like the whole KISS philosophy as well as not having to upgrade every 6 months to get the latest software versions. Also just installing Arch will teach you more about Linux than running Ubuntu for years will do.

Arch is my OS of choice on my home workstation and laptop, but where I'm in charge of IT at work it's Ubuntu LTS all the way.

A couple of links for those that don't know about Arch:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Arch_Linux
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/The_Arch_Way


Also I must mention #!. Whenever I'm asked to breathe life back into and old machine then CrunchBang is always the first distro that comes to mind.

forrestcupp
October 9th, 2012, 01:19 AM
For all those sabayon users how hard would it be to install sabayon xfce and then remove all the sabayon additions to gentoo and have a running gentoo without all the time consuming install?I think that would be a lot harder than just installing Gentoo.


I'm pretty sure that would beat the point of Gentoo, since Sabayon doesn't compile itself from source onto your computer (I think - I could be wrong. It's been a long time since I used Sabayon)
Sure it does. That's the beautiful thing about Sabayon. You have your choice of using Portage for compiling everything, or Entropy to install binary packages.

sidzen
October 9th, 2012, 03:49 AM
Non-Debian? That only leaves Slackware-based distros! Like SalixOS (http://www.salixos.org/wiki/index.php/Home).

mamamia88
October 9th, 2012, 04:08 AM
I'm pretty sure that would beat the point of Gentoo, since Sabayon doesn't compile itself from source onto your computer (I think - I could be wrong. It's been a long time since I used Sabayon)

OT: Fedora and openSUSE are tied for me.

fair enough. i just don't have the patience to install regular old gentoo. and it would probably take forever compiling on my netbook. i tried sabayon 5 awhile ago and was pretty impressed.

Uncle Spellbinder
October 9th, 2012, 12:38 PM
...i tried sabayon 5 awhile ago and was pretty impressed.

Try it again if you get a chance. They're up to Sabayon 10 now. I really liked it a lot. I'm using Fuduntu as my primary OS. Thinking of installing Sabayon 10 again and dual booting to get more familiar with Sabayon.

jrog
October 9th, 2012, 02:18 PM
I already mentioned Arch in this thread as a favorite, but I've seen a couple of people mention SalixOS, so I want to go ahead and give it a +1 too. It's nice work.

bodhi.zazen
October 9th, 2012, 07:03 PM
Fedora FTW !!!

Gentoo (hardened) is #2

Arch Linux is #3

dniMretsaM
October 9th, 2012, 07:13 PM
I'm currently enjoying Gentoo quite a bit (as is evidenced by my avatar), so I'd have to say that. I'm not a big fan of the RPM system, so I usually don't use/like distros that use it. I'll probably try Fedora 18 when it comes out, though.

KiwiNZ
October 9th, 2012, 07:19 PM
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Suse