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View Full Version : Do you work with linux?



Drenriza
September 28th, 2012, 09:41 AM
So i'am wondering.

How many on the forums that are working with Linux on a daily basis. And if your member of specific linkedin.com groups to get the newest news and job offers in that regard. And what education / certifications do you have?

Myself
I work as a Linux system administrator / 3'rd level support technician for Locatel.
My job role is being a 3'rd level technician for the firm in a global scale. Besides solving issues that has been escalated to 3'rd level, i work on a series of shell scripts for system wide monitoring, problem solution and different device configuration. Where the latest is SAT3 satellite modules from Novra.

Newest news from my line of work
http://www.hsyndicate.org/news/4057862.html

A small demo of what Locatel can offer
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7fcnNh9Lq8

My linkedin.com groups (member of) are
Linux System Administrators & Linux Administrator Jobs

My education is something called DataTechnician. Which is a 6 year long system / network administration study, focused on Cisco, MS and Linux.

What is your story?

Metallion
September 28th, 2012, 10:07 AM
*points at signature*

I'm a developer of open source IaaS software, Wakame-VDC. Quickest and very incomplete way to explain it would be that if you have any hardware available that can run Ubuntu, you can use Wakame-VDC to turn it into your own personal cloud similar to Amazon EC2.

Our vision is basically that computers are a bunch of electronics that communicate through wires and other electrical conductors. That's really not so different from a bunch of computers communicating through a network. What if you could install an OS on that?

With that principle in mind, we're working on a system that could in theory turn all datacenters in the world into a single computer. We provide the infrastructure with Wakame-VDC, the OS with Wakame-OS and the applications on top of it with Wakame-FUEL. We're strongly focused on VDC at the moment though.

Wakame runs on either Ubuntu or Centos so everybody here uses that all the time. As far as our own workstations are concerned, mine is Arch Linux and everybody else has either Macs or Windows pcs. I don't know how the latter cope. :)

As for groups, I'm a member of the Tokyo Linux Users Group. (http://tlug.jp/) Other than that I get invited to some other random developer meetings and attend those at times, too. Don't really use linkedin though. I have a profile but only used that to find a job in the first place.

Sableyes
September 28th, 2012, 10:18 AM
Kind of. Work in a small company (about 20-30 people) and all the PC's are Ubuntu. Im the 'Tech guy' among other things. So although I dont have a shiny title, I am the fixer / upgrader / general admin of them. ^^

moribashi
September 28th, 2012, 10:34 AM
I am an infrastructure manager at smaller company. I have tried using Linux for work several times but returned back to windows. Main problems I have found:
- Microsoft Exchange and lack of client fully supporting it
- LibrOffice and problems with editing documents (I have had several problems with that like not being able to open complicated excel files, formating problems with word documents, missing comments in word documents etc.)
- No real alternative to Visio
- No Vmware vSphere client

Otherwise I really love Linux but somehow still I feel that I am more productive on Windows. But I am fulltime Linux user at home. As I donšt have windows license I donšt have windows even in virtual box. :)

Metallion
September 28th, 2012, 10:44 AM
- No Vmware vSphere client

Have you tried rvc (https://github.com/rlane/rvc)? A while ago I wrote a feature for Wakame-VDC that lets it integrate and control ESXi/vSphere servers.

That's the only experience I have with vSphere so I don't know how it holds up against graphical Windows clients but I was able to get the job done with it. It served quite well as documentation too since it's built on the same ruby library that I used to implement said feature. :)

robgr85
September 28th, 2012, 10:45 AM
I'm using linux and playing with it on daily basis, but not at work. I was not so fortunate in finding linux related job - there is way too many experienced people in the industry willing to work for low wages (way too low for my living standard) :-P

I'm constantly searching for part time linux related job (systems or databases) to gain some valuable experience while still earning money for living at my current job (technical support / service desk).

moribashi
September 28th, 2012, 10:56 AM
Have you tried rvc (https://github.com/rlane/rvc)? A while ago I wrote a feature for Wakame-VDC that lets it integrate and control ESXi/vSphere servers.

That's the only experience I have with vSphere so I don't know how it holds up against graphical Windows clients but I was able to get the job done with it. It served quite well as documentation too since it's built on the same ruby library that I used to implement said feature. :)

Hi

Thanks for the suggestion but I still need Windows based client because we are managing hundreds of virtual servers and are using also SRM (Site recovery manager) for disaster recovery. And for managing and using those features you just need windows client. Vmware is developing a web based client but at the moment it is not full-featured yet.

But hey life gets easier for linux lovers every day. :)

Dragonbite
September 28th, 2012, 02:37 PM
No.

Although because of my Linux experience I am being moved into the role for development and maintenance of our FreeBSD web servers.

Otherwise it's Microsoft on the Inside; Office 2010, ASP.NET, MS SQL Server, Adobe Acrobat, etc.

At home, Linux outnumbers the Windows computers (2).

drmrgd
September 28th, 2012, 02:47 PM
I guess I'll jump in and break the trend for everyone. I'm a research biologist, who is currently working on Next Generation Sequencing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA_sequencing) for clinical applications. Although not a bioinformatisist by training, I've found myself doing more and more of this high level data analysis on a daily basis, and there is nothing more powerful, flexible, and useful than Linux for these tasks. From writing simple Perl / Python / etc. scripts to parse and extract data to writing BASH scripts to run data pipelines and manage data storage and whatnot, nothing can do it better than Linux.

So, while I don't have a Linux specific job per se, I use Linux constantly all day long and enjoy it thoroughly!

StinkySQL
September 29th, 2012, 10:14 PM
I work in a 100% Windows shop (c# only) that just inherited a Centos/Apache/Tomcat/mySQL product. Guess who got that assignment?

I installed Ubuntu 12.04 at home to start studying, and man has this stuff grown up! Love it.

jrog
September 29th, 2012, 10:19 PM
My answer: no, but I would really, really like to.

BigCityCat
September 30th, 2012, 01:18 AM
I use citrix to access the business network mon-fri. It is very important in helping me complete my daily assignments. I could use it from windows if I had to but I don't.

I use kubuntu though.

BigCityCat
September 30th, 2012, 02:34 AM
Here is a link for someone that is hiring with open source.

http://openwebosproject.org/

WinterMadness
September 30th, 2012, 03:08 AM
if you consider college work to be working with linux, then I do so exclusively. my college is 100% linux for all CS related stuff (and for non cs, its mostly mac) using windows would be a terrible inconvenience

HermanAB
September 30th, 2012, 07:49 AM
Since about 1996, everything I do is Linux based. It is mostly military, so that is about all I can say, but my hobby is the same as my work and if you want to know what my hobby is, go to diydrones.com and let the fun begin.

Smile, you are always on Candid Camera... ):P

Docaltmed
September 30th, 2012, 01:04 PM
I have a small business with multiple employees. I migrated the entire business to Ubuntu starting at 8.04 and completing at 9.04.

Worth every penny of it (heh). The ROI was about 6 months; instantaneously if you throw in the fact that I'm using a FOSS EMR system that otherwise would have cost me $10,000. That's a little unfair though, as I could have run the same EMR with Windows, though not as satisfactorily.

When I get IT guys in as patients, I always make a point to tell them that their doctor runs on Ubuntu.

One guy, a mover and shaker in the finance industry, said "you're in good company. All the servers on Wall Street run Linux."

Yup, if it's good enough to run the world's largest economy, it's good enough for me.

Drenriza
October 1st, 2012, 09:24 AM
HermanAB

Since about 1996, everything I do is Linux based. It is mostly military, so that is about all I can say

I won't tell anyone :)

But what military? US or other?

Docaltmed

I have a small business with multiple employees. I migrated the entire business to Ubuntu starting at 8.04 and completing at 9.04.
What business do you have? How much have Ubuntu saved you $, vs if you had used MS as an alternative?

BigCityCat

I use citrix to access the business network mon-fri. It is very important in helping me complete my daily assignments.
You use Citrix to access a Linux OS through the browser? What daily assignments do you have?

Jrog

My answer: no, but I would really, really like to.
Are you trying to get a Linux related job? If yes, what kind? :)

Metallion
Sounds quite interesting what your doing.

jrog
October 1st, 2012, 02:28 PM
Jrog

Are you trying to get a Linux related job? If yes, what kind? :)
I would love one, though I'm not actively pursuing one (in the sense of actually submitting resumes) yet. My educational background is not in a technical field, and that is a bit of a problem/obstacle for me. Even so, I have previous work experience primarily as a web designer/developer (CSS/HTML/JavaScript/some PHP) and a junior server administrator. I realize that the former isn't necessarily Linux-based (in fact, it typically isn't, though that isn't true in my case), but I work with Linux constantly in my daily life (testing software, filing bug reports, scripting and administering my own servers (primarily web servers)) and am to the point where I would like to be involved with it professionally in some way.

Drenriza
October 1st, 2012, 02:39 PM
I would love one, though I'm not actively pursuing one (in the sense of actually submitting resumes) yet. My educational background is not in a technical field, and that is a bit of a problem/obstacle for me. Even so, I have previous work experience primarily as a web designer/developer (CSS/HTML/JavaScript/some PHP) and a junior server administrator. I realize that the former isn't necessarily Linux-based (in fact, it typically isn't, though that isn't true in my case), but I work with Linux constantly in my daily life (testing software, filing bug reports, scripting and administering my own servers (primarily web servers)) and am to the point where I would like to be involved with it professionally in some way.

Are you thinking about taking some certifications in the future to get more into the Linux job market? If so, which?

Just curious :)

bleutyler
October 1st, 2012, 02:41 PM
Software Developer on a Large Web Application.

I use Linux exclusively, since 9.04.

jrog
October 1st, 2012, 02:42 PM
Are you thinking about taking some certifications in the future to get more into the Linux job market? If so, which?

Just curious :)
Yes, definitely thinking about it. I'm pretty confident that I could get Linux+/LPIC-1 certified with little (to no?) studying required. Beyond that, I haven't looked into the details of more advanced certifications enough to know how much preparation they would require. I hear that RHCE is a bear, though also probably the most widely-respected Linux certification. I'm certain that it would require serious prep., but that doesn't mean I'm opposed to it!

Drenriza
October 1st, 2012, 02:55 PM
Yes, definitely thinking about it. I'm pretty confident that I could get Linux+/LPIC-1 certified with little (to no?) studying required. Beyond that, I haven't looked into the details of more advanced certifications enough to know how much preparation they would require. I hear that RHCE is a bear, though also probably the most widely-respected Linux certification. I'm certain that it would require serious prep., but that doesn't mean I'm opposed to it!

You would need to take the RHCSA before you would be able to take the RHCE. I myself are considering starting out with the LPIC-1 & -2.


Software Developer on a Large Web Application.

I use Linux exclusively, since 9.04.

Thats deep ,)

georgelappies
October 1st, 2012, 05:16 PM
Unfortunately no. I am a system specialist for a suite of process plant / power / marine design software. This software only runs on windows. The sad thing is that the back end of this suite runs on Oracle 11g but the application vendor only supports it's products if you run Oracle on Windows server (yes I know... :()

I am to far into my career to switch now, besides I enjoy my work as it is a mixture of engineering, software implementation and evaluating new technologies (recently kicked of a success full high definition laser scanning project).

At home I only use Linux though.

Metallion
October 2nd, 2012, 07:31 AM
Metallion
Sounds quite interesting what your doing.

It is. :) I get to work with bleeding edge software all the time and never need to do the same thing long enough to get bored. Also our company is one of those smart ones that recognises programming as a creative job. We're free to choose our own hours, tools and wardrobe and such.

Also if you're interested in Wakame, there's a video of me looking like an *** presenting it (http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/19752300) somewhere on the internet. We also have the impress.js slides (http://wakame.jp/wiki/materials/20120114_TLUG/) online.