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aysiu
June 28th, 2006, 06:10 AM
There's another thread out there asking how many people actually code (http://www.ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=200455), but it appears to be answered only by people who actually do code.

I'm just curious, though, about how many people code and how many people don't code.

Edit: By the way, I answered "I got trained in some kind of coding at some point, but I don't code." My senior year in high school, I took an AP Computer Science course that was in... Pascal, I think? We did stuff like putting values into an array and them pulling them out with While loops.

I've long forgotten how to do anything like that, and I don't even know if that language is viable any more. People seem to use Python, C++, and Java or whatnot.

Every now and then I get the urge to look at a programming for beginners book, but the "hello world" thing really turns me off.

rai4shu2
June 28th, 2006, 06:26 AM
I can code, but I mostly do consulting nowadays.

user1397
June 28th, 2006, 06:31 AM
I can't code!!! :(

let's see, my coding skills max out at...the "hello world" online tutorials...

jnev
June 28th, 2006, 06:33 AM
I'm taking a computer science course at school so I somewhat can.. and learning some more languages on my own this summer. for now it's just for fun, hopefully someday I can do something useful with it...

fluffington
June 28th, 2006, 06:41 AM
I've been programming for fun since forever (I was developing rules for pen and paper RPGs and strategy/tactics games since before I can remember, and transitioned easily to doing the same in code when I first used a computer).

I graduated with a BS in computer science (didn't learn a damn thing) a little over a year ago, and have been programming professionally since.

Right now, I'm in the process of starting my own software company (which will mostly make games that run on Windows, OSX, and Linux --- I'll be sure to tell everybody how to pay for my stuff as soon as I have some stuff to sell).

dtfinch
June 28th, 2006, 07:44 AM
I started programming early on in basic, then later qbasic and vbdos. I also learned a bit of assembly. All self taught at the time.

In high school I took AP Computer Science (Pascal here too), Programming in C, and a combined Visual C++ and Java class. On the side I also learned VB3 and later moved up to 4 and then 6. Javascript was pretty easy.

Straight out of high school I got a summer job writing small VB apps and asp pages in vbscript, which turned into a part time job when I went to college. In college (SOU) I managed to take every CS course offered (I think) and nearly every CIS course, excluding the first year courses. Learned some more languages such as perl, Oracle PL/SQL, VB.Net, and C#, most of which I've barely used since. But overall I'm sure it made me a better programmer, and I learned some OpenGL.

Around the middle of college I switched jobs to the one I have now. I write a lot of javascript and sql, and basically do everything that the rest of the company doesn't know how to do. They have a scary old ERP system written in COBOL that I swear belongs on thedailywtf.com, and getting any useful information out of it requires a lot of custom reports. I occasionally find a task suited for C or Java, and jump at the opportunity. I've quietly taught myself some php and python on the job, but I've only had a few opportunities to use them.

Stromham
June 28th, 2006, 07:59 AM
i am a for fun programmer and i have been doing it for a few years (6-8).

siimo
June 28th, 2006, 08:13 AM
code for living - graduated recently as a software engineer. Though not what most of you probably are interested in ](*,) . Yes, MS .NET stuff with SQL 2005 backend :mrgreen:

23meg
June 28th, 2006, 08:17 AM
For those who favor a distinction between the terms "programmer", "developer", "computer scientist" and "coder", I'd be closer to a drive-by developer. I started out with BASIC on a C64, continued with pascal and objectpascal (Delphi) and now I know my way around javascript, html, css, bash and am trying to get round to becoming semi-proficient with python and ruby. I also work with multimedia programming environments such as Processing and Pure Data. I'm also into computation theory and spend time with theoretical texts considered essential by computer scientists and programmers.

tribaal
June 28th, 2006, 08:17 AM
Programmers of the world, unite! :)

I code for a living, and I'm lucky enough to do stuff I actually consider fun *and* get paid for it. Isn't life great? ;)

- trib'

MaximB
June 28th, 2006, 08:23 AM
I couldn't be more far from codeing
except maybe doing a little scripts at text editors.
I'm a 3dgraphic man... :)

minden
June 28th, 2006, 08:26 AM
i learned python around when it first came out
dont really remember any thin from it
i never made anything besides some personsal usage things

DirtDawg
June 28th, 2006, 08:38 AM
Every now and then I get the urge to look at a programming for beginners book, but the "hello world" thing really turns me off.

I usually substitute it with "word, bitches".

joselin
June 28th, 2006, 08:49 AM
strcpy(ubuntuforums, "i code for a living");

fuscia
June 28th, 2006, 08:56 AM
this is the furthest i've ever gotten with online tutorials...

echo "hello wor....zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

i just can't read this stuff. it's almost as if some autoprotection device in my brain causes my eyes to become unfocused. i've tried, but i just can't do it.

Wolki
June 28th, 2006, 09:48 AM
I'd recommend Why's Poignant Guide to Ruby ( http://www.poignantguide.net ) for people with an aversion to programming introductions. It has it's very own style (and even synergy ;) )

Anyway, I can't really code, but tend to try nonetheless when I find the time.

bruce89
June 28th, 2006, 12:08 PM
I am doing Visual Basic (6) for Advanced Higher Computing, not that it is considered programming.

mozetti
June 28th, 2006, 12:19 PM
Learned at some point, but don't code. I had to take classes in both C and COBOL. I spent most of my time in the COBOL class thinking, "How am I ever going to use this?" At least with C, it's still a useful and living language -- didn't COBOL die in the 80's?

xtacocorex
June 28th, 2006, 12:45 PM
I don't yet program for a living, but I'm soon to be there I think.

Otherwise, I program for fun.

nuvo
June 28th, 2006, 12:54 PM
I have experience with Object Pascal (Delphi 6, 7 and Kylix 3), PHP, XHTML, CSS, and a little Ruby (I'm learning Ruby and RoR).
I tried to pick up C++, but the syntax just didn't appeal to me and Object Pascal suited my needs just fine.
C# has been a language I've thought of learning, as has Python, but I just haven't got around to doing so.
I program mainly for the fun of it, but can push out some decent stuff if needed.
My main area's in Pascal were code editors and IRC clients and in PHP it's mostly been site managment and web directory systems with mySQL.
Hopefully, Rails will allow me to continue my web coding in a more elegant way (though I'm still trying to think of a logical way to implement a textpattern style templating language with Rails).

BWF89
June 28th, 2006, 01:16 PM
I took a class in Visual Basic last year at school but I hated it and by now I don't remember a single thing I learned.

All I remember is that when you make a program to add 2 textboxes full of numbers you can't just write Textbox1+Textbox2=Textbox3, you have to put something like {val} infront of it or something like that so that it knows that 2+2=4 and not 2+2=22

Christmas
June 28th, 2006, 01:19 PM
I'm a student at a computer college and I code C and C++, but I'm learning ATM. Still a newbie but I guess coding will be the way of earning a living for me. I couldn't find an option that fits me so I voted the first one.

MikePnKY
June 28th, 2006, 02:45 PM
I'm not a programmer...I'm a "pointer and clicker". Much beyond that, and I have to read the directions :rolleyes:

neoflight
June 28th, 2006, 03:12 PM
i like to code...but i dont code for a living....part of my school work is done by coding....mostly matlab...

i am taking some personal projects so that i can expand my skills on c++, and the like...i am learning shell scripting too... planning to learn some cnc machine coding...

compmodder26
June 28th, 2006, 03:58 PM
I code for fun and for a living.

Started learning VB in high school. Then Pascal, C++ and Perl in college.

Now I mainly use PHP coupled with HTML, Javascript and SQL. Currently am a Webmaster but starting next week I will be starting a new job as a Server Administrator/Systems Programmer.

prizrak
June 28th, 2006, 06:16 PM
There's another thread out there asking how many people actually code (http://www.ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=200455), but it appears to be answered only by people who actually do code.

I'm just curious, though, about how many people code and how many people don't code.

Edit: By the way, I answered "I got trained in some kind of coding at some point, but I don't code." My senior year in high school, I took an AP Computer Science course that was in... Pascal, I think? We did stuff like putting values into an array and them pulling them out with While loops.

I've long forgotten how to do anything like that, and I don't even know if that language is viable any more. People seem to use Python, C++, and Java or whatnot.

Every now and then I get the urge to look at a programming for beginners book, but the "hello world" thing really turns me off.
Head first Java by O'Reilly is a really good book to learn how to program in Java. Instead of Hello World you make a 99 Bottles of Beer program :)

ubuntu_demon
June 28th, 2006, 06:20 PM
I voted other because I'm student so I sometimes code for school courses/projects. I also code for fun sometimes but not very often.

aysiu
June 28th, 2006, 06:20 PM
Head first Java by O'Reilly is a really good book to learn how to program in Java. Instead of Hello World you make a 99 Bottles of Beer program :)
Maybe next time I get the "Hm. I think I might want to learn Java" bug, I'll be sure to check it out. Thanks for the recommendation.

Stormy Eyes
June 28th, 2006, 07:22 PM
I code for a living. It sucks, but I'm not good enough to earn a living as a musician.

kassetra
June 28th, 2006, 08:06 PM
Hopefully, Rails will allow me to continue my web coding in a more elegant way (though I'm still trying to think of a logical way to implement a textpattern style templating language with Rails).

Have you tried Radius (http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.ruby/browse_thread/thread/b8a495f0ba6ba292)?
There's also Liquid (http://home.leetsoft.com/liquid), which is the slaphappy new templating engine for RoR.

I use Ruby and RoR exclusively now - after years of a dozen or more other languages.

G Morgan
June 29th, 2006, 02:00 AM
I code for fun at the moment. Learnt Pascal in school andhave learned C/C++ of my own volition (still early on really but I'm confident with the basic syntax and structure).

I'm off to uni to do CS next year so much more coding in the future.

Jessehk
June 29th, 2006, 05:47 AM
Just for fun. :)

I know C++, Python, Ruby, and some C.

Aelfric5578
June 29th, 2006, 06:24 AM
Right now I code mostly for fun. I have a novice command of Java and Visual Basic. At some point I might turn this into a career. I will be pursuing a computer science major at college this fall.

IYY
June 29th, 2006, 06:55 AM
I code for a living, but I do more artsy things for fun.

amohanty
June 29th, 2006, 07:09 AM
I kinda got hooked when I was able to make a chopper animation in GW-Basic in 5th grade on something that was called a pc circa 1986. Then took a break for about 6 years. Been programming in something or the other since then. Sort of lucked into computer sciences (You dont get electives in India - you either are in engineering school or not) and now code for a living...

Its kind of ironic that after 19 years of education, 7.5 of which were spent learning how to code - the best programmers I know dont have degrees :) Not that I mind... just sort of ironic...

AM

fluffington
June 29th, 2006, 08:28 PM
Its kind of ironic that after 19 years of education, 7.5 of which were spent learning how to code - the best programmers I know dont have degrees :) Not that I mind... just sort of ironic...

The really crappy ones don't have degrees either.

I imagine I'd be one of those degreeless super programmers, though, if I had spent four years working and improving my skill instead of paying some guy to babble about how to measure the efficiency of yet another search/sort algorithm (yes, I have a degree; no, I didn't learn a anything in the process of getting it).

guine
June 29th, 2006, 09:22 PM
My high point in programming was when I was coping code for tictactoe off the board in high school 5 or so years ago and I added cats as a possible ending. I took that as a good point to run away and never look back.

brentoboy
June 29th, 2006, 09:28 PM
for a living--it pays the bills

I'm back in school part time so I can teach high school math.
then I will code for fun (and some extra cash).

Steve S.
June 29th, 2006, 09:34 PM
Every now and then I get the urge to look at a programming for beginners book, but the "hello world" thing really turns me off.

Wow, funny you should mention this, but I just thought I might learn Ruby (a Linux mentor suggested it) and the first thing that I was reading talks about that "hello world" thing!;) Oh, well, I'll probably learn it anyway.

And to answer your question, this would be my first progr. language.

curtis
June 29th, 2006, 09:43 PM
I'm not the best at programming but I can do a decent amount of things in C, C++, Java, Perl and PHP and a little in ASM. I want to have a go at learning Python soon though as it looks quite interesting. Well I say programming in Perl and PHP, but I personally class that as scripting as you do not compile the code as it gets interpretted.

Really once you figure out the main things such as variables, pointers, functions, loops, memory allocation and a bit of socket programming your be fine with most things.

etank
September 17th, 2006, 02:26 AM
I code mostly for fun and just to learn. I have done a few things for work in Perl and PHP. I have never been trained it was all self taught.

I would love to get involved with a small group to create something. I really don't care what it is as long as it is somewhat useful to someone.

Bree
September 17th, 2006, 03:18 AM
I know a little C++, Java and Python, but as with most things I've learned I never use any of those. :rolleyes:

xhaan
September 17th, 2006, 03:19 AM
I put no... :p
I don't know if it counts, but I used to make some pretty complex Apple basic and logo programs... and I managed some simple video games in basic with joystick support and collision detection...

But I couldn't do any of that today if my life depended on it, it's been far too long. ](*,)

maniacmusician
September 17th, 2006, 03:36 AM
i've dabbled in C++, java, VB, and python. Never really did get it very well. Mostly the problem was that I didn't have enough time to start really learning. And plus, i learned them all while still on windows...never really knew what to do with them.

I was thinking about trying python again, and also ruby. sounded interesting.

just need to make time.

rfruth
September 17th, 2006, 03:39 AM
I dabble with it but nothing serious :)

nsleiman
January 15th, 2007, 08:04 PM
i am still programming for fun and curiosity :) i am thinking of jumping to professional coding to earn some extra money maybe.
C++, Java (im in love with),

wert613
January 15th, 2007, 08:08 PM
if coding includes
HTML
DHTML
XML
CSS
and
HTML DOM

and a little java script,
then yes i do code.
Mostly for fun though.

jpeddicord
January 15th, 2007, 08:57 PM
I code for the fun of it. I'm 14 and currently job-less, so I can't consider it a job yet. I am looking into programming related jobs in the future however.

Here is a list of languages I know, in order of proficiency:

PHP
C++
Python
HTML/CSS/JavaScript/Other web development
Perl

Erunno
January 15th, 2007, 09:47 PM
I'm a CS student and imagine my surprise after the first couple of terms that it has very little do to with programming ;) If I want to learn a new programming language I'll have to do it in my sparse free time.

I'm proficient with Java and did some C++, Visual Basic and Perl coding in the past but not on a very professional level. Once I have more free time at my hands I plan to try to get into KDE development to improve my C++ skills and due to being fond of the project in general.

jordilin
January 15th, 2007, 09:48 PM
I code just for fun, but mostly things to automate common tasks. My preferred languages are C sharp, python and shell scripting

kuja
January 15th, 2007, 10:01 PM
I feel like answering, but I'm not sure what answer to choose ... I guess I'd take the "looking for my first programming job" option if there was one.

blackened
January 15th, 2007, 10:03 PM
I started with Javascript, VB, and Batch. I do a little Python and shell scripting now, but I'm by no means an expert in any of the above. Usually I spend most of my time looking up functions or syntax that I have long since forgotten. I can do it, but sometimes I need the internet equivalent of a cattle prod to the head.

seijuro
January 15th, 2007, 10:22 PM
I voted other I had C in High School and C++ in college but they were intro courses and really didn't teach much along the lines of application development they were mostly to get you familliar with how programming languages work in general. However I am proficent in XHTML, PHP, and Perl all self taught. Currently I'm looking to build up my programming skills to become a linux software developer.

Biggus
January 15th, 2007, 11:30 PM
Hmm. Does no-one else still write code using Sinclair BASIC?

randomnumber
January 16th, 2007, 05:50 AM
I program for a degree so I chose program for a living, being that working on my degree is all I do now. I find it weird that our school went to c++ sometime ago then when I attended they went to Java. Now that the failure rates are over 50% they plan to go back to C++. I am glad that they are doing this but I wonder how this will affect my career options. I like Java and I think it has better syntax but I know the industry is not really moving to Java. Someone is going to reply and say that phones have Java App's. The reason I do not see the industry moving to Java is that the only things able to run Java are PC's and phones etc. The processors have to be able to run Java class files or they have to implement a virtual machine. Face it. they are not going to be double the hardware costs of devices so that they run Java. Please understand that the PC's are a limited view point of programming.

I apologize for taking the subject on a tangent like this.

STREETURCHINE
January 16th, 2007, 06:44 AM
nope no codeing here,unless morse code counts.lol

Pobega
January 16th, 2007, 01:21 PM
I program in PHP right now, I'm learning Python and I'll be continuing onto C. This is all in my spare time; In college I plan on taking C++/Java/Perl/Whatever else and making a career out of it.

So I voted, preemptively, for "I do it for a living"

maagimies
January 16th, 2007, 01:30 PM
I do know how to code in various languages... it's just that I'm horrible when it actually comes to writing something and figuring out good ways for coding the program,
most often I know the language but can't implement it ](*,)

But when I do program, I do it for fun.

amo-ej1
January 16th, 2007, 01:36 PM
C and C++ for a living and for fun ;) Mainly for fun but making a living out of it is nice too :D

Erunno
January 16th, 2007, 02:03 PM
I program for a degree so I chose program for a living, being that working on my degree is all I do now. I find it weird that our school went to c++ sometime ago then when I attended they went to Java. Now that the failure rates are over 50% they plan to go back to C++. I am glad that they are doing this but I wonder how this will affect my career options. I like Java and I think it has better syntax but I know the industry is not really moving to Java. Someone is going to reply and say that phones have Java App's. The reason I do not see the industry moving to Java is that the only things able to run Java are PC's and phones etc. The processors have to be able to run Java class files or they have to implement a virtual machine. Face it. they are not going to be double the hardware costs of devices so that they run Java. Please understand that the PC's are a limited view point of programming.

Well, that is not entirely true. Java is well established in the enterprise application market (for instance Websphere) where stability, portability and security are more valued than the few percent of raw application speed you get using more low-level languages like C/C++.

RandomJoe
January 16th, 2007, 02:53 PM
I know enough to be dangerous! :mrgreen:

Got corrupted early on, with BASIC on my TI and a friend's CoCo2. Had one each of QuickBasic, Pascal and C class in college. The C class was when I realized perhaps I would rather go software than hardware but that was my senior year...! So coding got relegated to a hobby at that point.

Unfortunately I don't do enough coding to remember all the details, so C/C++ was particularly frustrating for me. Then I tried TCL/TK a few years back and even made a useful mini-app for work in the first week I played with it - very nice! Right now I'm getting serious with Python, its syntax is much more like how I think so it's pretty simple for me.

I can also at least stumble my way around in Perl, shell scripts, SQL code, and Ruby.

Now, after 12 years working on the hardware side of control/automation systems I'm putting serious thought into polishing up the coding skills and ideally find a gig doing both at the same time.

Zimmer
January 16th, 2007, 03:00 PM
Hmm. Does no-one else still write code using Sinclair BASIC?
Started with that early 80's and picked up all sorts of non-mainstream stuff like APL (A Programming Language!) for mainframe IBM,
Bits of machine code for Sinclair and Acorn Electron, SAS, Recital (a DBase variant) and bits of VB.
Now retired, thought about Ruby, may yet install and have a bit of fun with that, if I can find the time !!
The poll mentioned training . Training!! I spent many hours (nay, days) reading the manuals.... no money for training ....