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Ubun2to
August 31st, 2012, 11:29 AM
Today I was booting a VM, when VirtualBox notified me that there was an update available.
So, I downloaded the file, went to open it, and I got the reply "The Ubuntu Software Center has unexpectedly closed". Seems this happens every time I try to open a .deb file without having already launched the Software Center sometime after I turned on my computer.
I have GDebi and Synaptic on my computer (GDebi is great for installing packages that the Software Center won't work with due to being "incomplete"; Synaptic for multi-package installs), and I use both of them frequently.
So, what is your primary package manager? Do you stick with the Software Center? Or do you use an application like Synaptic? How about a combination of both?
I prefer the Software Center for looking at apps and deciding which ones I want (and installing .deb files I find online), and Synaptic for installing the packages I found in the Software Center.

nativehound
August 31st, 2012, 11:41 AM
I like


aptitude

Best there is.

Jakin
August 31st, 2012, 11:52 AM
Synaptic preferred, but its just there incase, i mostly terminal apt install and update everything.

I do have Software Center for those boring days.. When i want to just look through a convenient catalogue to try something new- that i might never have aware of, had it not been for such a neat app.

mips
August 31st, 2012, 01:14 PM
pacman

sffvba[e0rt
August 31st, 2012, 01:16 PM
apt-get has super cow powers.


404

wojox
August 31st, 2012, 01:24 PM
sudo dpkg -i <application.deb>

vasa1
August 31st, 2012, 01:29 PM
pacman
On Xubuntu?

Mikeb85
August 31st, 2012, 03:02 PM
Zypper...

mips
August 31st, 2012, 03:34 PM
On Xubuntu?

On Arch.

pacman as far as I'm aware is available for debian but does not integrate well.

mamamia88
August 31st, 2012, 03:46 PM
I like both pacman and apt. Wish pacman would use pacman -i to installl package rather than pacman -S to install a package since it makes more sense. pacman is also easier to spell than aptitude which i always mess up somehow. Other than that it's pretty much all the same to me. Pacman seems a little faster but honestly who really cares as long as it works?

johnnybgoode83
August 31st, 2012, 03:53 PM
Synaptic and apt-get install

Primefalcon
August 31st, 2012, 04:16 PM
My fav gui is synaptic, though I usually just use the CLI.... tbh one of the first things I remove is the update manager.......

I have a script that runs updates as I shut my system down anyhow... so.... update manager is kinda pointless to me

lykwydchykyn
August 31st, 2012, 04:18 PM
I like


aptitude

Best there is.

Me too! Hope they get the multiarch issues worked out so I can use it on 64 bit again.

vexorian
August 31st, 2012, 04:48 PM
I use apt-get when installing small things. It is fast.

For installing things that take long to download. Or when uninstalling packages or managing repos, I prefer Synaptic.

Although what I do lately is use synaptic to generate a list of package URLs to download (inderectly, by using its download script generator) and then take the list to jdownloader. It allows me to pause download and control the download speed). Then I put redirects of the downloaded packages to /var/cache/apt/archives

oldos2er
August 31st, 2012, 06:17 PM
apt-get

uhgreen
August 31st, 2012, 07:25 PM
pacman and portage.

pacman is, obviously, faster but portage is great because of customization and options.

Lucradia
August 31st, 2012, 07:31 PM
Aptitude / Apt-Get

Synaptic, that's all.

KiwiNZ
August 31st, 2012, 07:38 PM
Software Centre, simple, quick and no messing around.

vexorian
August 31st, 2012, 11:13 PM
And might freeze or crash while installing.

Mikeb85
September 1st, 2012, 12:14 AM
And might freeze or crash while installing.

+1

I love the fact they make it so easy to buy software, but it's so slow and buggy it makes me angry every time I use it....

njwarrior
September 1st, 2012, 12:29 AM
I find aptitude to be the best method. Definitely prefer it over software center or synaptic.

josephmills
September 1st, 2012, 12:35 AM
dpkg

MadmanRB
September 1st, 2012, 03:05 AM
Synaptic though Muon is growing on me.

Gone fishing
September 1st, 2012, 04:13 AM
I seem to use lots of them!

Software centre usually its nice to browse and see what's available. I don't like the lack of information about progress perhaps a button or a keystroke to open a teminal so you could see the progress would be nice. dpkg for installing single deb files, which I try to avoid much better to use a proper repository and apt-get to install packages I know, simply and quickly.

For being geeky the ports system in FreeBSD takes some beating.

Linuxratty
September 1st, 2012, 01:40 PM
Synaptic for me.

malspa
September 1st, 2012, 01:54 PM
Synaptic, and apt-get.

pqwoerituytrueiwoq
September 1st, 2012, 04:10 PM
synaptic
i set my .debs to open in GDebi
apt-get

effenberg0x0
September 1st, 2012, 05:20 PM
apt-get has super cow powers.


404

But it has no elephant being eaten by a snake:

aptitude -vvvvvvv moo

:)

Regards,
Effenberg

mamamia88
September 1st, 2012, 07:18 PM
isn't synaptic just a front end for aptitude? when i was using ubuntu i found the software center too slow on my machine. so unless i didn't know the name of the program i wanted to install and i had to search by description i would avoid it at all costs. i would only use synaptic if i didn't know the exact package name. now i do the same thing with arch i just don't need a front end i just use http://www.archlinux.org/packages/ as a replacement for synaptic and when i find one i want to install i just pacman -S nameofpackage

malspa
September 1st, 2012, 07:23 PM
isn't synaptic just a front end for aptitude?

Front-end for apt.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SynapticHowto

http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/debian-faq/ch-pkgtools.en.html

vexorian
September 1st, 2012, 07:55 PM
They need to update synaptic so that it can run without root. Let it request root only when installing/uninstalling packages or modifying repository list.

Right now, since you have to run in root, it can't, for example, use the global menu, and has issues with local GTK themes.

malspa
September 1st, 2012, 08:18 PM
You can actually run Synaptic as a normal user, although you can't install anything or modify the repositories. I just started it in Debian Squeeze from the command line:


$ /usr/sbin/synaptic

ratcheer
September 1st, 2012, 09:23 PM
I also prefer aptitude, but I hear it has a some problem with Ubuntu 12.04 and higher, so now I use apt.

Tim

forrestcupp
September 1st, 2012, 09:24 PM
Let's not forget that most of what people are talking about aren't actually package managers. The two biggest package managers are apt and rpm. Things like Synaptic, Software Center, Aptitude, Yum, and even apt-get are all front-ends to the actual package manager. Pacman is an actual package manager, though.


I like both pacman and apt. Wish pacman would use pacman -i to installl package rather than pacman -S to install a package since it makes more sense. pacman is also easier to spell than aptitude which i always mess up somehow. Other than that it's pretty much all the same to me. Pacman seems a little faster but honestly who really cares as long as it works?

I saw someone once who created a script named "pacman", and it took whatever arguments you pass to it to convert it to an apt-get command. I thought that was interesting for people who are coming from using pacman.

smellyman
September 2nd, 2012, 12:30 AM
pacman/yaourt

mamamia88
September 2nd, 2012, 12:50 AM
Let's not forget that most of what people are talking about aren't actually package managers. The two biggest package managers are apt and rpm. Things like Synaptic, Software Center, Aptitude, Yum, and even apt-get are all front-ends to the actual package manager. Pacman is an actual package manager, though.



I saw someone once who created a script named "pacman", and it took whatever arguments you pass to it to convert it to an apt-get command. I thought that was interesting for people who are coming from using pacman.

wonder if they have something that is the opposite of that.

forrestcupp
September 3rd, 2012, 02:41 PM
wonder if they have something that is the opposite of that.

I'm sure if you were using Arch, it wouldn't be very hard to create a script called "apt-get" that can use your apt-get arguments to execute a pacman command.

OrangeCrate
September 3rd, 2012, 03:01 PM
Though I've tried rpm based distros over the years, I started with apt, and I prefer it for day-to-day use. Synaptic is my favorite front end, but, I use apt-get in the terminal just as often, I guess.

mamamia88
September 3rd, 2012, 05:37 PM
Though I've tried rpm based distros over the years, I started with apt, and I prefer it for day-to-day use. Synaptic is my favorite front end, but, I use apt-get in the terminal just as often, I guess.

yeah no point launching a gui just to install a package