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oygle
August 30th, 2012, 10:25 AM
Have just installed 12.04, after using 10.04. The DE is not impressive at all, very difficult to use. I understand I can change the desktop, so can somone please advise what is the most stable DE to use ?

(Use KMail and KMyMoney as apps).

Oygle

El Tito
August 30th, 2012, 10:44 AM
Well, I suppose it's a matter of personal taste. I tried unity and gnome 3.x , but didn't convince me (at least so far). Right now I use KDE configured to look like gnome 2, and in the past I also tried xfce. I like both of them. I never have had a problem of stability with xfce. With KDE yes, a bug when I tried to shutdown the computer, but it was the only and after a few updates it was fixed.

tartalo
August 30th, 2012, 12:18 PM
If you like K programs, and prefer a more "traditional" desktop than Unity it makes a lot of sense to move to KDE.

If you move to KDE, you might want to change the default "single click opens folders" behaviour to "double click opens folders" (or maybe not).

cmcanulty
August 30th, 2012, 01:37 PM
can you post how to make kde look like gnome 2

tartalo
August 30th, 2012, 02:26 PM
can you post how to make kde look like gnome 2

I haven't tried it:
http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2011/04/how-to-easily-create-a-gnome-style-panel-layout-in-kde

ranger1021994
August 30th, 2012, 02:31 PM
Try coping with Unity..
Even I didnt like it when i moved from GNOME 2 but on seeing GNOME 3, I started to like Unity :P

You can try KDE,XFCE and others...
KDE is very famous..its next to GNOME

SJR Dorset
August 30th, 2012, 02:59 PM
Having tried Unity and others I finally settled on Xfce. I have found it stable and have customised it to suit my needs.

eldudorinio
August 30th, 2012, 07:20 PM
Have you considered trying LXDE? It's very light.

oygle
August 31st, 2012, 02:10 AM
Thanks for your replies. Is gnome-panel stable ? I hear is has the Gnome Classic. My update manager doesn't seem to have any desktops for KDE ?

Lots of thinhs 'missing' in Unity though.

I simply need a DE that is the same as I had in 10.04.

Does anyone know the names of these DE's in 'Ubuntu Software Centre ?

Thanks,

Oygle

SJR Dorset
August 31st, 2012, 07:54 AM
In the Ubuntu Software Centre look for Xubuntu, Lubuntu or Kubuntu.

Xubuntu is Ubuntu with XFCE
Lubuntu is Ubuntu with LXDE
Kubuntu is Ubuntu with KDE

oygle
August 31st, 2012, 07:56 AM
What do I install to use the KDE desktop ??

Can I install multiple desktops (like GNOME and KDE), and switch between them ?

Oygle

vasa1
August 31st, 2012, 08:07 AM
... My update manager doesn't seem to have any desktops for KDE ?
...
You look in the Ubuntu Software Center and not update manager when you want to install something. Type kubuntu-desktop in the search box and enable view technical items if necessary.

deadflowr
August 31st, 2012, 08:09 AM
To install KDE in ubuntu just install the package kubuntu-desktop.
And yes you can switch between Gnome and KDE at the login screen.
If you want to switch click the cog next to your login name and select the DE you want to use.

oygle
August 31st, 2012, 08:12 AM
You look in the Ubuntu Software Center and not update manager when you want to install something. Type kubuntu-desktop in the search box and enable view technical items if necessary.

Thanks, I'm running Ubuntu, and there is a kde-plasma-desktop there. Is that all I need for a KDE desktop in 12.04 ?

oygle
August 31st, 2012, 08:13 AM
To install KDE in ubuntu just install the package kubuntu-desktop.
And yes you can switch between Gnome and KDE at the login screen.
If you want to switch click the cog next to your login name and select the DE you want to use.

Okay, thanks, have found that.

If I wanted to install GNOME, do I simply install gnome-shell ?

Oygle

SJR Dorset
August 31st, 2012, 08:18 AM
You can install all of the different desktop environments to give them a try if you want to. If you do that all you have to do is select the one you want to use on the login screen.

Be aware that installing another DE may change you login screen as well.

oygle
August 31st, 2012, 08:24 AM
In the Ubuntu Software Centre look for Xubuntu, Lubuntu or Kubuntu.

Xubuntu is Ubuntu with XFCE
Lubuntu is Ubuntu with LXDE
Kubuntu is Ubuntu with KDE

Thanks for the explanation, as I thought Kubuntu was a 'different' DEB to Ubuntu.


You can install all of the different desktop environments to give them a try if you want to. If you do that all you have to do is select the one you want to use on the login screen.

Be aware that installing another DE may change you login screen as well.

Okay, thanks. :)

vasa1
August 31st, 2012, 08:25 AM
...
Be aware that installing another DE may change you login screen as well.
When I installed the xfce 4.10 ppa, I got a grub page that I really rather not have ;)
Anyway, I don't have to stare at it too long and so I've left it as is.

mastablasta
August 31st, 2012, 08:25 AM
If I wanted to install GNOME, do I simply install gnome-shell ?


Gnome is already installed with Ubuntu. Unity is working on top of Gnome.

if you want old gnome, you can install Mate
if you want Gnome shell then yes you need to install gnome shell.

if you want Kubuntu then you need to install Kubuntu-desktop. if you don't like the menu style in Kubuntu right click on K and switch it to classic menu (which then arranges itself to look like old widnows menu).

vasa1
August 31st, 2012, 08:32 AM
Gnome is already installed with Ubuntu. Unity is working on top of Gnome.
...
I think OP wants a GNOME session.

oygle
August 31st, 2012, 08:42 AM
Have installed Kubuntu, at least I can see different windows in task bar.

'mastablasta', thanks for the tips.

Now, in Kubuntu, where do I change 'single click' to 'double click'. I remember that always 'got me, that one click (files open).

oygle
August 31st, 2012, 10:10 AM
It was in Dolphin, and the 'adjust view properties', did the trick.

I like Kubuntu. :)

doktorOblivion
August 31st, 2012, 01:27 PM
I have used all the DEs, prefer Gnome the least, KDE next, but XFCE the most and have been using it for years. Lightweight, fast and efficient. There have been some snags along the way but by in large a great DE, I recommends it.

nothingspecial
August 31st, 2012, 02:23 PM
Thread moved to Recurring Discussions.

MadmanRB
August 31st, 2012, 04:19 PM
Most stable in my mind is XFCE and its easy to see why.
Firstly Gnome shell freezes a lot in my experience, I am unsure if its a fault of Ubuntu and its version of Gnome shell but it is very prone to freeze outs.
KDE while highly customizable and feature rich does suffer a lot in Ubuntu. Plasma seems not to get along with Ubuntu too well, and with KDE not really being actively worked on Canonical makes it even more prone to issues. KDE seems to be better in other distros like OpenSUSE or Magia.
Unity is Ubuntu's pride and joy and while being rock solid on my hardware Unity leaves a lot to be desired if you like tweaking things to your own liking and not being stuck with the standard layout.
Gnome classic is very stable, but its a a pain to tweak, having to hit alt and right click to modify panels is a pain in the you know what.
LXDE is still very young, while mostly stable it still lacks the ability of being easy to tweak here and there. Especially setting the clock.
XFCE is very much like gnome classic but better then gnome classic as its easy to modify panels.
The downside is that its not too good with Compiz so if you like fancy effects it is a bit of a letdown but its still very rock solid stable.

Myrddin Emrys
September 1st, 2012, 08:47 PM
I simply need a DE that is the same as I had in 10.04

In 10.04 you were using Gnome 2, which is still available but is now renamed 'MATE'. It's not in the official Ubuntu repository, but you can install it in about 5 minutes using the current developers' own repository:

http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=11931784

The other alternatives in this thread are well worth trying on their own merits, but 12.04 with MATE gives you a nearly identical experience to 10.04 with Gnome 2.

nothingspecial
September 1st, 2012, 08:57 PM
In 10.04 you were using Gnome 2, which is still available but is now renamed 'MATE'.

mate is not gnome2 renamed, it is a fork of gnome2

Myrddin Emrys
September 1st, 2012, 11:06 PM
mate is not gnome2 renamed, it is a fork of gnome2

Well yes, obviously it's a fork. It was renamed to make this clear, and also to avoid conflicts with a concurrent Gnome 3 installation.

Arbayong
September 1st, 2012, 11:15 PM
Thanks for your replies. Is gnome-panel stable ? I hear is has the Gnome Classic. My update manager doesn't seem to have any desktops for KDE ?

Lots of thinhs 'missing' in Unity though.

I simply need a DE that is the same as I had in 10.04.

Does anyone know the names of these DE's in 'Ubuntu Software Centre ?

Thanks,

Oygle

perhaps you should install synaptic package manager:
sudo apt-get install synaptic

and u can search for packages as in older ubuntu versions.
easier and much more rewarding to use synaptic:lolflag:

oygle
September 2nd, 2012, 01:48 AM
perhaps you should install synaptic package manager:
sudo apt-get install synaptic

and u can search for packages as in older ubuntu versions. easier and much more rewarding to use synaptic:lolflag:

Is Muon package Manager the same ? Seem to be.

For now, I'm happy with KDE (KUbuntu), it's much more like GNOME2, and leaves the Unity desktop well behind. The biggest difficulty I had with Unity was having several windows/tabs with Firefox (or any app). You had to click one to get focus, then click again and all windows would appear on the desktop, but you could not see (too small) what each window was. Before very long those Icons on the left hand side became too many (seems no easy was to build a menu structure), making it even harder to navigate.

Yes, I'm please with KDE. :)

Jakin
September 2nd, 2012, 02:23 AM
Is Muon package Manager the same ? Seem to be.

Essentially, yes (accomplishing the same things the same way, with basically the same GUI):)

WinterMadness
September 2nd, 2012, 05:16 AM
the most stable ones are probably the older ones. decent choices are kde 3(trinity project) or gnome 2

KDE 4 is stable too. I havent used gnome 3 or unity enough to say anything about them

oldos2er
September 3rd, 2012, 07:46 PM
KDE's been very stable for me; I haven't seen any of the system freezes others are reporting.

ojdon
September 3rd, 2012, 11:41 PM
I personally use the Kubuntu spin. KDE does the job of being a "daily basis" DE.

LXDE is the most stable environment I've ever used... However, that's probably just because it's so lightweight nothing can really go wrong. ;)

NormanFLinux
September 11th, 2012, 10:29 PM
Okay, thanks, have found that.

If I wanted to install GNOME, do I simply install gnome-shell ?

Oygle

If you install GNOME Shell, install Cinnamon - its worth your time and will work as a shell over GNOME Shell just like Windows or KDE. Its customizable. Great desktop environment for both noobs and experienced Linux users.

houseworkshy
September 12th, 2012, 12:27 AM
I came to linux via a live disto which was an early version of Knoppix, that ran KDE. After I'd saved work a few times with it when Windows had it's characteristic wobble fits I decided to try linux on a hard drive install. Went distro hopping and after a few found Ubuntu running gnome2. That was perfect for me and whilst I continued playing on the other drive I stuck with that as my main one. From 7.04 to around 9.04 Ubuntu was problem free, then it changed it's focus and whilst it did have some new features many old features were lost and making it work began to require more research and fiddle time. In short it became a development playground and ceased to be suitable for a system one relies on to meet deadlines. Keyboard mapping, the change in boot managers, the shift to Unity, and a lot more. The changing of the file manager is one of the next, so I read.
When anything in a development focused distro is perfect it is abandoned because there is nothing left to play with. It's the same with GUI development, the gnome team focus on development so the death knell for Unity will be perfection, in short don't get dependent on whatever they are up to now as it will vanish as soon as it is right.
You mentioned in your first post that stability was the thing. So in order to have a stable system read up on the philosophy of the team. Currently KDE have stated that stability is more important than development to them, so I recommend them. Whilst it is fairly heavy on system resourses for a linux desktop it is one that you could use for years without fearing the whole thing will be ditched forcing you to learn something utterly new at regular intervals.
One can take the same approach to the distro underneath too. I now have debian stable with only stable repositories enabled and the KDE version before the one that is being developed now as the GUI as my main 'work' system and only play with the buggy but new features distributions on another drive.
Take the stress out of it by having two systems installed. As long as one always makes sure that the new development happy one doesn't mess up the boot one is free to play.
When one has a protected working computer bit then one gains the confidence to play with the new but buggy toy stuff.
In short duel boot. Have one which one can rely on, in the 'buntu world that would be kubuntu but could just as easily be Mepris if you want a stable debian kde combo set up for you. On the experimental side 'buntu is a good choice as the installing of differant GUI's and choosing at startup is made easy, they also focus on the latest high tech hardware. Then play.
For stability and configurability KDE is stunning, you can make it look and behave almost any style you like. There are many many choices of GUI.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desktop_environment
When distro hopping years ago I saw KDE but didn't dig into it, the default is only one choice of setup and I hadn't realised that at the time. Get into the configuration and it gives you more power over how you want to relate to your computer than any other GUI I've seen so far. If Unity hadn't displaced gnome2 I may never have dug into KDE and realised that it was better all along. Lots on line but to fiddle with now take a look at widgets, panels and activities. Unlock them, choose 'add' and look at the helps, you have so much power you could probably imitate any other desktop or make up your own. Certainly Gnome2 and Unity are easy to imitate; look at panels and after acting on that look at adding widgets. You can make junkname themes so can play as much as you like without messing up any 'well this way gets you round and works' distro defaults.
So the advice to the original op is, kde is a very good choice for the work system, dig into how to use it. Youtube has some good stuff; searches like "+KDE +configure +tutorial" produce stacks of results.
I like to see things before trying them, for that youtube is major, brilliant on tutorials and preinstall previews of distro's, programs etc but one has to trawl through the lint. Use the minus symbol in front of the name of whatever garbage clutters your search to exclude it on each next search attempt
So I recomend make sure your favorite beverage is close to hand, sit back and have a video evening focused on various distros and GUI's, then maybe try one which you like the look of on the experimental part of your machine. But the big deal before you can relax because it's not important is get the work side of your machine stable and safe. For that, to a newbie, Kubuntu or Mepris would be the my recomended choices because of KDE's commitment to stability.

heminder
September 12th, 2012, 12:32 AM
I'm going to be the oddball and suggest Openbox. It's so stable that it's bare. In my experience it simply cannot go wrong. There is literally nothing there to go wrong with. Edit its configuration to start with Tint2 and there you go: barebones useable desktop. I always have that setup alongside with whatever else the distro comes with and it never ever fails. It's only 10Mb too!

houseworkshy
September 12th, 2012, 01:02 AM
I like fully fuctional minimalism so agree that openbox is gorgeous. Enlightenment is also +1, e7 looks stunning but I havn't played with it properly yet. Even LXDE can do a lot when one gets into the command line configure. Truth is the answer to "what's best?" is "what do you want to do with it?". If stability is the big deal then for 'buntu' users it seems to be Xfce or KDE on desktops which are best bar none. Unity on mobile devices, if you can make it work, unless you have the cash for the, dramatically superior, Microsoft or Apple GUI's for mobile devices.
Odd that any concern should ditch 'market sector leader' in favour of 'also ran' in a differant sector but that's open source. Useful features become stable will become the heart code of user friendly systems for decades to come. That isn't something casual users have to worry about, just go for 'stable' and 'no bugs' and you'll find operating systems and GUI's to suit.

TeamRocket1233c
September 12th, 2012, 05:12 PM
Well, have you tried Cinnamon out, or even the Lubuntu or Xubuntu desktop? You could also give Fluxbox a shot.

vexorian
September 12th, 2012, 05:35 PM
I am using unity. Its main issue is performance, really. My computer is fast enough to deal with it most of the time. But for heavy games I switch to a single terminal instead of DE.

I used to use Gnome 2 until I switched to 12.04. Then I tried plenty of things.

Unity - Initially did not like, growing on me like I mentioned.
Gnome-Shell - Initially did not like. But I learned it is VERY customizable. But After downloading 600 plugins I still did not like the end result THAT much. Seemed like I was remaking Cinnamon to be honest.
Cinnamon: Actually cool stuff. But I didn't stick to it for some reason. I think it does not have too much of a user/developer base. I gave up when I couldn't get a resource monitor applet similart to the kind I like.
XCFE: I can't get past the fact that its desktop icons have a solid color box as background for their text. Yes, this is silly. I also don't like that it replaces most of my apps. I like GNOME apps.

One day I might try KDE but not feeling it yet. Maybe I might even download the Kubuntu 12.04 live CD so I could try it without filling my setup of countless of duplicate programs.

Regarding stability, I seriously have nothing in my memories that would tell me any of them is more stable than the other. I remember a good bunch of them crashing a bunch of times.

drawkcab
September 12th, 2012, 10:53 PM
Gnome shell is not stable. On the other hand, it's not atrocious. I still use it and just reboot on the occaisional hiccup. If I needed serious stability I would not use it.

I think openbox/lxde have been the most stable for me.

markbl
September 13th, 2012, 12:53 AM
Gnome shell is not stable.
I find Gnome Shell rock solid on Ubuntu. I've been using it full time on 11.10 and 12.04. Occasionally I switch to Unity to see where it is at but always find a few little quirky bugs etc. Unity updates seem to be fragile compared to Gnome Shell which just seems to run more smoothly. Odd I know given that Unity is "native" to Ubuntu but that is my experience. My perception is that Mutter is a more robust and simple design than Compiz.

I seriously think that it has become a meme to criticize Gnome Shell before people have really given it a good go. This meme flourished after Linus's infamous comments. Gnome shell improves on the old Gnome 2 way of doing things but people do not like change, particularly since we have been using a classic taskbar nearly all our lives. You have to give it time to appreciate the new way to do things. I use Apple's OSX Mission Control (10.8, Mountain Lion) frequently also on my MBA notebook and it is great but Gnome Shell is up there also, even though it is a much more minimalist design.

cmcanulty
September 13th, 2012, 01:09 PM
could someone post how to tweak open box to have panels like in gnome 2. I have tried it but it is so empty I couldn't get around to it doing anything.

houseworkshy
September 15th, 2012, 04:51 AM
http://openbox.org/wiki/Configuration
Always look in the horses mouth first.