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tomsax
August 25th, 2012, 03:33 PM
I'm trying to install ubuntu 12.04 by creating a partition for it.

I get to the option where I choose "Something else" and then get the list of partitions. I have:

dev/sda1 ntfs
dev/sda2 ntfs
dev/sda3 ntfs
dev/sda4 fat32

sda2 is the big one.

I tried to change the size of sda2 but before I could install the change it says I should create "swap space" which I don't know how to do. So I abandoned that and tried to shutdown.

Then when I tried to start the laptop as usual with Windows 7 it told me that the system needed to be repaired and it took about 2hrs to do so.

Its a new laptop with loads of space and I would like Ubuntu and Windows 7 on the machine but it is proving very hard to acheive this.

Any help out there?

Bucky Ball
August 25th, 2012, 03:37 PM
Hold everything!

You can only have four primary partitions on one physical drive else it gets tricky. Avoid.

Basically, you want something like three primary partitions and one extended partition. Inside the extended partition you can create as many logical drives/partitions as your hardware can handle. Ubuntu will happily live in there (Win should be drive 1/primary partition 1 to keep it happy).

What is on the NTFS drives? I see no free space so where are you going to install Ubuntu? It uses EXT* partitions, not NTFS. Start with free space or delete the NTFS partitions to create free space after you choose 'Something Else'.



If you have an existing big NTFS data partition, Ubuntu will be able to use that (you can set up some symlinks to it when Ubuntu installed.

Are you dual-booting with Windows?

Finnicella
August 25th, 2012, 05:17 PM
Do you have an HP?
If it' so
dev/sda1 ntfs is the partition for windows boot
dev/sda2 ntfs is the partition with windows 7
dev/sda3 ntfs is the partition Recovery
dev/sda4 fat32 is the partition HP TOOLS
I've also an HP and I deleted sda4, resize windows with windows tool and whit the unallocated space I make an extended partition for Ubuntu.
If you have questions I'll try to answer.
Bye
Finny

tomsax
August 25th, 2012, 05:29 PM
Hold everything!

You can only have four primary partitions on one physical drive else it gets tricky. Avoid.

Basically, you want something like three primary partitions and one extended partition. Inside the extended partition you can create as many logical drives/partitions as your hardware can handle. Ubuntu will happily live in there (Win should be drive 1/primary partition 1 to keep it happy).

What is on the NTFS drives? I see no free space so where are you going to install Ubuntu? It uses EXT* partitions, not NTFS. Start with free space or delete the NTFS partitions to create free space after you choose 'Something Else'.



If you have an existing big NTFS data partition, Ubuntu will be able to use that (you can set up some symlinks to it when Ubuntu installed.

Are you dual-booting with Windows?

There is no free space.

tomsax
August 25th, 2012, 05:32 PM
Do you have an HP?
If it' so
dev/sda1 ntfs is the partition for windows boot
dev/sda2 ntfs is the partition with windows 7
dev/sda3 ntfs is the partition Recovery
dev/sda4 fat32 is the partition HP TOOLS
I've also an HP and I deleted sda4, resize windows with windows tool and whit the unallocated space I make an extended partition for Ubuntu.
If you have questions I'll try to answer.
Bye
Finny

Yes its a HP laptop. I could try that though it seems a pity to lose the HP tools, especially as I think I've just used them to restore my computer.

arunes007
August 25th, 2012, 05:39 PM
There is no free space.
Format the drive which is least usable to you through the linux live disk.
in ext2 mode coz ubuntu cant be installed on ntfs partitions.
Declare the root file as "/".
And if u have some space which is unpartitioned...make them swap space.
U can also continue without creating swap space...

Finnicella
August 25th, 2012, 05:39 PM
To restore your computer you need the recovery partition.
Naturally, make a backup of the files inside the HP TOOLS partition and I suggest you to make the dvd of the recovery partition and a back up of all your important data too.
Bye
Finny

sandyd
August 25th, 2012, 05:42 PM
HP Laptops have a tool to create restore discs.

Those things are equivilent to your recovery partition, and most people delete their recovery partition after creating them.

Just create a few sets of discs, delete the recovery partition, and you should be on your way.

Bucky Ball
August 25th, 2012, 06:08 PM
+1 to what Finni and Sandyd have been saying, but crucial point that was mentioned earlier but is worth repeating; once you've made the recovery disks of the recovery partition and deleted it, resize the existing partitions with the tools in Win.

Once you have plenty of free space you're good to go with creating the extended partition with it.

After that: Make a plan before you launch off, though, of how you are going to set up the Ubuntu partitions. Good luck. ;)

tomsax
August 26th, 2012, 10:58 PM
I've backed up HP recovery on DVDs as suggested (as well as also creating a windows recovery disk and copying the drives contencts to an external hard drive.

I've deleted the HP tool drive from using the ubuntu DVD (windows didn't allow me to do it or warned me not to).

So, I have free space (over 100 GB) and only three partitions remaining.

Still when I try to install "within windows" for a dual boot (first option) it fails. I get some text and then it asked me to remove media and press enter, then it restarts in windows...

I am thinking of using something else but will this give me a dual boot on start up, the type I can choose windows or ubuntu when I start up? Also concerned that the first option above doens't work implying a problem.

tomsax
August 26th, 2012, 10:58 PM
BTW, thanks for all the previous input and help. Much appreciated.

tomsax
August 26th, 2012, 11:04 PM
Now realised I hadn't deleted as I hadn't clicked install (as in install delete?). But if I do click install it says no root system is defined and asked me to correct this from the partitioning menu.

mansonfan78
August 26th, 2012, 11:13 PM
Reboot with the live cd in the drive. Select "install ubuntu" then go to "something else". You'll need to specify partitions manually and set up your unallocated space as three separate extended partitions: 15-20 gb as ext4 mounted as /, a partition equal to or larger than your physical ram mounted as swap, and the rest as ext4 mounted as /home. Make sure you select the box next to "format" on the / and /home partitions.

tomsax
August 26th, 2012, 11:27 PM
I've now deleted the HP tools drive in windows. Now the 1st option of installation in windows seems to work and is chugging away as I write on this other laptop.

Should that work or might it all end in tears?

mansonfan78
August 26th, 2012, 11:42 PM
That should work then, although installing within Windows isn't the best option if you're planning on using Ubuntu long-term. The procedure I mentioned earlier would be better and in case you're wondering, it would install the grub boot menu which allows you to dual boot with Windows (grub actually allows several operating systems on one computer, not just two).

linuxguy049
August 27th, 2012, 02:39 AM
Just for education sake: Is this booting into windows because the bootloader is stored somewhere other than C: ? So it goes to boot that drive, but nothing is there?

Bucky Ball
August 27th, 2012, 04:29 AM
Moved to Installation & Upgrades.

Mark Phelps
August 27th, 2012, 09:14 PM
Just for education sake: Is this booting into windows because the bootloader is stored somewhere other than C: ? So it goes to boot that drive, but nothing is there?

Presuming that you installed Ubuntu from INSIDE Windows -- if your PC first boots into Windows, then it is behaving properly.

When you install from INSIDE Windows, it does not use GRUB, nor does it create a GRUB menu; instead, it modifies the Windows boot to add an entry for Ubuntu.

Instead of a partition, you get a file (root.disk) created INSIDE the NTFS partition and Ubuntu will run from there.

linuxguy049
August 28th, 2012, 01:15 AM
Presuming that you installed Ubuntu from INSIDE Windows -- if your PC first boots into Windows, then it is behaving properly.

When you install from INSIDE Windows, it does not use GRUB, nor does it create a GRUB menu; instead, it modifies the Windows boot to add an entry for Ubuntu.

Instead of a partition, you get a file (root.disk) created INSIDE the NTFS partition and Ubuntu will run from there.

Oh. I guess I misread.

I thought he had installed from a CD or something, onto C. I know that with HP lt's, windows is everywhere, and so I figured his bootloader for windows was still floatin around.

Thanks for clarification!