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View Full Version : What are the advantages of using Ubuntu over Windows 7?



pty1196
June 29th, 2012, 05:25 AM
Thanks.

ubudog
June 29th, 2012, 05:26 AM
You may wish to read this (http://www.ubuntu.com/project/about-ubuntu).

robtygart
June 29th, 2012, 05:38 AM
For me

Pro: Its faster, its free, it has 1000s of free software, easy to customize, a lot of different Ubuntu biased Operating systems to choose from, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Edubuntu, Lucid Puppy.

Cons: Not great for gaming, can run Windows software under "Wine" but some programs might not work, or might have problems. (But Linux has an alternative software)

cariboo
June 29th, 2012, 05:47 AM
Thread moved to the Cafe, as it isn't a support question.

prshah
June 29th, 2012, 07:50 AM
Thanks.

I prefer Ubuntu to Windows 7 for simple reasons:
a) No EULA hanky panky; Windows 7 EULA spells out restrictions. Ubuntu EULA basically just says: "Do what you want, but don't restrict for others the freedoms you have received."

b) Runs very smoothly even on my Atom n450/2GB netbook; Genuine Windows 7 home basic (pre-loaded) is very sluggish, and nearly unusable at times.

c) Extremely capable and extremely powerful for those who are not command-line phobic. It's powerful anyway, but you can reach new realms of possibilities with the command line.

As for free, that is not really a factor. I would be happy to pay for Ubuntu, in it's current form and license.

There's also plenty of free software for both OSs, and usually free software is multi-platform (Eg, GIMP), so I don't factor that into my choice either.

Hardware manufacturer and/or standardization is really the only issue with Ubuntu now, and only for very few products.

Bandit
June 29th, 2012, 08:09 AM
If you look at it from a technical standpoint then the advantages are arguable. Which would be speed, stability and compatibility. But each user has their own experience. But what is for sure is Linux is much easier to customize all across the board and there are many options and ways to do it.

If you look at it from a legal standpoint, its clear that with the GPL license you own more of your computer, how it runs, what do you want it to do, and it can not be taken away. With Windows the EULA is very restrictive, you never really own a copy of Windows, what you actually own is a license to use windows. Thus you dont have an OS on your PC, MS has their OS on your computer, they dictate what can and cant be done with the system and the formats on which it and the software resides. With Linux whats yours is yours. ;-)

na5h
June 29th, 2012, 08:15 AM
Ubuntu is less prone to viruses and malware...and it's fast!

Gone fishing
June 29th, 2012, 08:26 AM
It just generally nicer - it comes with useful programs installed and installing more is effortless with the software center no more trolling the net for hours avoiding scumware etc.

Fast, stable secure and nice.

And we shouldn't forget Free both as in beer and Freedom when you run Ubuntu, Linux or a BSD its yours, not just rented with strings attached from Apple or MS.

Copper Bezel
June 29th, 2012, 08:39 AM
Fun.

pty1196
June 29th, 2012, 05:10 PM
Thank you for all your kind replies. :)

Skydiel
June 29th, 2012, 05:35 PM
I agree with all the answers posted before. Windows sucks!
I like Linux because I don't fell as somebody is dictating me how I have to do things. You can freely choose the way that best suits your needs. But I have to admit. This freedom comes with a cost: the learning curve is high. Sometimes you just don't have time to explore. Nothing is perfect.

Tombradyhasamachinehead
June 29th, 2012, 06:43 PM
my reasons in NO ORDER of importance!

1. You dont need to defrag. EXT4 is more efficent than NTFS.

2. It is faster. My core dual core i3 laptop beats my sisters quad core i7 my brothers core i5 in loading speed. Both there laptops have 6GB of ram while mine has 4GB ram. However i am sure in computations that use cpu theres will be better. There laptops have windows 7

3.you can edit the linux source code.

4. you dont have to relie on only one company to fix bugs. You see ubuntu is open source and everyone can see the code, where as microsoft is the only one who can see the windows source code.

Tombradyhasamachinehead
June 29th, 2012, 06:44 PM
the only disadvantage i find to ubuntu is gaming. But i have never been a pc gamer, i use my ps3 for gaming

flemur13013
June 29th, 2012, 07:05 PM
Windows better than linux/ubuntu:

- Better hardware/driver support.

- Better apps; everything from file browsers and backups to DVD authoring... They're definitely NOT from microsoft! (Free, 3rd party apps). I'm NOT impressed with most linux applications.

- Can defrag disks (ext4 disks definitely defrag, just slightly less than NTFS). Again, with 3rd-party apps.


Linux/ubuntu better than windows:

- Free
- Slightly faster.
- More reliable.
- No idiotic "registry".
- Basic OS and filesystems are more sensible.
- Windows ignores or can't handle multi-boot and ext filesystems.
- Excellent command line functions. It's amazing what you can do if you know a bit and work at it (pretty big learning curve).
- Very superior desktop/user interface / GUI. I really hate the windows desktop and replace it with others (emergedesktop or blackbox) , but it's still a PITA. If you don't like the linux desktop, change it or replace it! (the main reason that I hate Windows - it's so user-hostile in all operations. People who have only used Windows don't know what they're missing).

Erik1984
June 30th, 2012, 02:17 PM
Fun.

This.

Ubun2to
June 30th, 2012, 06:01 PM
Partitions are something I have noticed recently while I was moving from Wubi to a Ubuntu partition.
Unless you have EFI (which is rare on commercially sold computers-they still use BIOS), you can only have 4 primary partitions. Extended partitions limit your abilities, although they can move around the 4 partition limit.
Anyway, PC manufacturers are wasteful with partitions. It is cheaper just to have a factory image partition for recovery than to include a CD, and so they do just that. However, most PCs use a total of 3-one for the boot, one for Windows, and one for the factory image recovery. That leaves one for the user to utilize.
I demolished my factory image so I could have swap space and used my leftover partition for Ubuntu.
I have resized the Windows partition so that Ubuntu has more favor-sometimes VirtualBox just doesn't cut the mustard.

Paqman
July 1st, 2012, 09:00 AM
I demolished my factory image

Always the way forward. You can actually get ISO images of Windows direct from Microsoft, and they'll be without all the preloaded bloatware from the PC manufacturer.

Ubun2to
July 1st, 2012, 01:54 PM
Always the way forward. You can actually get ISO images of Windows direct from Microsoft, and they'll be without all the preloaded bloatware from the PC manufacturer.

Also without drivers, but the drivers they have are always for overpriced items in the computers to begin with. I have only seen 1 manufacturer that doesn't completely overprice their equipment-System76. Kinda amazing that the big companies can't strike good rates with the manufacturers. I blame the CEOs' paychecks.

prshah
July 1st, 2012, 08:19 PM
You can actually get ISO images of Windows direct from Microsoft, and they'll be without all the preloaded bloatware from the PC manufacturer.

Not really. You can get ISO images (legal!) directly from MS, but they are retail ISO images.

Pre-loaded OS uses OEM licensing. So the license key to your pre-loaded OEM W7 will not work with the downloaded image.

if you contact MS for a downloadable ISO for an OEM product, they will tell you to contact the licensee (manufacturer of your product).

Paqman
July 2nd, 2012, 08:16 AM
Not really. You can get ISO images (legal!) directly from MS, but they are retail ISO images.

Pre-loaded OS uses OEM licensing. So the license key to your pre-loaded OEM W7 will not work with the downloaded image.


You sure about that? I just installed Win 7 on a machine a couple of days ago and the ISO from Microsoft worked fine with the COA sticker. It seems to have activated fine, no nagging yet.

Even if it didn't, I'm sure you could just call Microsoft and activate over the phone, after all you have to be able to replace dead hard drives that took their recovery partition to the grave with them.

prshah
July 2nd, 2012, 11:06 AM
You sure about that?

From the Microsoft Licensing FAQ:

Q. If I need to reinstall the operating system on a machine from a direct OEM (e.g., Dell) that my customer has brought in, how should I do this?

A. A customer who wants you to reinstall Windows must provide recovery media from the direct OEM, because the software is licensed to the customer for use on that PC by that OEM. You cannot use your own OEM System Builder media to reinstall the operating system, or any other version of media (e.g., TechNet, MSDN, Action Pack, etc.), because these versions differ from the original OEM Windows license your customer acquired from the direct OEM. A customer who doesn't have a backup copy of the software for reinstallation will need to contact the original OEM and request replacement recovery media; you can use that media to reinstall the operating system on that machine.

If you have used the retail images and the COA product key has been accepted and verified, then your machine is using a retail license, NOT an OEM license. In this case, your manufacturer is to be commended for supplying you a (more expensive) retail license rather than an OEM license.

Further, even a "technical" violation of license terms means your OS is treated as pirated (even if it passes WGA). OEM license MUST include COA, hologram CD (or OEM rescue CD), and license terms documentation. Just having a COA affixed is not considered as a valid license to use Windows.

These licensing terms are, in my opinion, unfair and unsuitable to casual users. The Windows EULA and licensing terms are one of the main reasons why I prefer not to use Windows.

Paqman
July 2nd, 2012, 01:52 PM
Just having a COA affixed is not considered as a valid license to use Windows.


Seems a bit harsh. So a user who buys a second-hand machine and replaces the hard drive should theoretically go out and buy a new licence, given that getting install media out of OEMs is like getting blood out of a stone (and likely infinitely more so in the case of a second-hand user) and would probably cost money anyway?

prshah
July 2nd, 2012, 09:08 PM
Seems a bit harsh.

That's probably the understatement of the year. And it gets worse.

For example, if I am a system builder, I cannot make my own "recovery" CDs for my customers (eg, using partimage, or ghost, et al). I HAVE to ship the "hologram" (install) CD only. I can, however, make a hard-disk based recovery solution, which is damn-all use when the HDD conks.

Then, let's say that you have two drives on a single system. One would think it's OK to install Windows with the same product key on each, since you can only boot into one at a time. That way, one can be a backup incase something blows up with the other. Nope; you need two licenses (Not only for OEM; for retail as well).

Another: You have a volume license for your organization. You'd imagine that it's OK to purchase a OS-less PC (Called "naked" by MS) and then install the software that is covered by a Volume license. Nope. To use software that you have covered with your Volume license, you require a license to already exist with the PC you've purchased. So you need a license, to use a license that you already own. Go figure. Oh, and btw, if you do go ahead; the old license is "discarded invalid".

And this is well known: You've been using the same old PC for years now. Everything's fine. Now, you decide to upgrade to a new motherboard (Say you need USB 3?). BOOM. Your OEM license is invalid, because "If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created".

Let's talk about "downgrades". You've got Vista, but want to downgrade to XP. Sure, it's allowed. However, for the downgrade to be legal, you MUST install Vista, accept the EULA, and only THEN can you format and install a downgrade.

All these licensing terms have evolved in a bid to protect Microsoft's interests. I can understand why, but I still feel vaguely let-down when I'm treated as though I am guilty of "technical" piracy until proven innocent.

Which is why the "non-restrictive and don't restrict" nature of GPL and other similar licenses is a breath of fresh air.

Copper Bezel
July 3rd, 2012, 01:43 AM
prshah, you are simply wrong. Regardless of what you can do for a customer as a third-party service, individuals can download the Windows ISO for their respective Windows editions and reinstall the system, which is the question that was initially raised. The installer accepts the registration key that's printed on the bottom of the PC. This is the only way that an individual can so much as upgrade an old machine to a new hard drive.

It's a process unique to Windows 7, since it wasn't an available option for Vista, and since XP initially came with install media.

prshah
July 3rd, 2012, 09:25 AM
prshah, you are simply wrong.

About what? Use of retail images with OEM product key? Or about the other license restrictions that I pointed out?


individuals can download the Windows ISO for their respective Windows editions and reinstall the system,

You say it can be done. Microsoft says it can't. Let's just agree to disagree.


which is the question that was initially raised.

The initial post was about how might Ubuntu be better than Windows 7. I accept the thread seems to be drifting, but nevertheless, Windows 7 licensing terms are more difficult than Ubuntu.


The installer accepts the registration key that's printed on the bottom of the PC. This is the only way that an individual can so much as upgrade an old machine to a new hard drive.

You can upgrade your HDD WITHOUT needing to reactivate Windows. The OEM edition is tied to MOTHERBOARD only. The FPP (Full Product Pack) aka Retail pack MAK (Multiple Activation Key) is not tied to any hardware component.


It's a process unique to Windows 7, since it wasn't an available option for Vista, and since XP initially came with install media.

Windows 7, Vista and XP ALL come with install (aka "hologram") media, for OEM and Retail versions. It's only System Builder licensees and BTA (Big Time Assemblers) eg: Dell, HP, et al who don't distribute the original "hologram" media. Instead, they substitute a HDD recovery method, AND allow creation of Recovery Discs by the end-user.

However, if you feel I'm wrong, I welcome corrections in which you have a credible references/citations/source. Everything I've mentioned here is given in more details in the Microsoft OEM Licensing FAQ (http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/pages/licensing_faq.aspx).

Paqman
July 3rd, 2012, 01:39 PM
You say it can be done. Microsoft says it can't. Let's just agree to disagree.


As a bit of an update: the Win 7 system I installed the other day using the code on the COA sticker has in fact started popping up an alert saying it did not activate online (this was an OA key). I had thought it was already activated because when I told it to activate itself it said it already was.

Phone activation was successful. So you certainly can use the retail image with an OA sticker. It seems MS would prefer us to use the image from the OEM, but they don't actually block activation using the generic image from them.

Copper Bezel
July 3rd, 2012, 07:18 PM
Yeah. I'm not going to argue whether or not it's possible to do something that I've recently done myself.

By OEM installs, of course, I mean computers that people actually buy in stores. If all of the computers that people actually buy in stores are special, and therefore don't count as OEMs, then it's certainly possible that OEM licenses have special restrictions, so long as the phrase "OEM license" is very specially restricted in itself.


You can upgrade your HDD WITHOUT needing to reactivate Windows. The OEM edition is tied to MOTHERBOARD only. The FPP (Full Product Pack) aka Retail pack MAK (Multiple Activation Key) is not tied to any hardware component.
Are you assuming that the average user has the equipment (and patience!) to clone the drive? I imagine it's far more typical that the new hard drive would get a fresh install.

sunfromhere
July 10th, 2012, 10:57 PM
For me, Linux is more logical.

Once you "forget" what you used to do in Windows, getting things done in Ubuntu (and other distros I've tried) follows the rules of logic. The rules are simple, and it's easy to get things done. If you stumble, there's...

Terminal :D

Imagine if you haven't used a computer before. This would be the way things are done. Windows tend to "simplify" for the ordinary user, and at the same time complicating the simplest of things.

And the most important thing, if you have a network - mount & symlinks. You'll learn to appreciate them once you try to share a Thunderbird profile on a couple of computers on Windows.

jedispork
July 19th, 2012, 12:40 AM
I don't like the idea of windows being tied to the motherboard. The phone activation has also been down when I have called before. I think it would be much easier to buy the full retail so you know that you can always transfer to new hardware and not wonder if you are eligible with your upgrade key etc. I have the upgrade edition on my current pc but next time I won't even bother with windows on the desktop.

I also wanted to mention IIRC I have also used retail windows discs with the sticker on the pc and it activated without problems. Having a disc with service pack updates is handy.

Edit: It gets even better. Microsoft is doing away with full retail so you will need to buy a new license whenever you change motherboards.

http://www.techradar.com/news/software/operating-systems/windows-8-full-retail-version-not-available-pros-and-cons-1088995

Ubun2to
July 19th, 2012, 10:28 AM
I don't like the idea of windows being tied to the motherboard. The phone activation has also been down when I have called before. I think it would be much easier to buy the full retail so you know that you can always transfer to new hardware and not wonder if you are eligible with your upgrade key etc. I have the upgrade edition on my current pc but next time I won't even bother with windows on the desktop.

I also wanted to mention IIRC I have also used retail windows discs with the sticker on the pc and it activated without problems. Having a disc with service pack updates is handy.

Edit: It gets even better. Microsoft is doing away with full retail so you will need to buy a new license whenever you change motherboards.

http://www.techradar.com/news/software/operating-systems/windows-8-full-retail-version-not-available-pros-and-cons-1088995

Actually, their policies already stated that new motherboards require new licences.