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View Full Version : [SOLVED] Linux is Unix?



linux12
May 27th, 2012, 11:37 PM
I got an error message when going to a site that said it did not support my OS, and it listed it as Unix. I thought Ubuntu was Linux? What's the difference anyway?

Jimmyfj
May 27th, 2012, 11:49 PM
In a way you can say that Linux is UNIX. The fact is that Linux is UNIX compatible. Both Linux and UNIX is POSIX compatible and share a lot of functionality.

The main difference for the two is that UNIX is Proprietary and Linux is FOSS. So in your use of Linux you'll see a lot of things mention UNIX. I.E. CUPS, Common Unix Printing System. A lot of programs written for UNIX runs on Linux and vice versa.

xedi
May 27th, 2012, 11:58 PM
Unix is often used when you want a single word for Linux and Mac since both are Unix-Like, so I guess that's why it says Unix.

Unix is an ancient operating system and somewhat the spiritual precursor of Linux operating systems.

lisati
May 28th, 2012, 12:03 AM
Ubuntu is based around Linux, which in turn was inspired by MINNIX, an educational version of UNIX. Common wisdom is that it's better to refer to Ubuntu as Unix-like due to trademark and other such niceties.

You might find this article interesting: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Linux

linux12
May 28th, 2012, 12:25 AM
interesting....

mlentink
May 28th, 2012, 07:48 AM
Unix is an ancient operating system and somewhat the spiritual precursor of Linux operating systems.

Ancient? Is OSX ancient? Or BSD?

zombifier25
May 28th, 2012, 07:53 AM
Ancient? Is OSX ancient? Or BSD?

I think xedi was referring to the original UNIX specification, which was made around the 70s. And again, some OSs have registered with the UNIX trademark holders and are allowed to use the word "UNIX", like Mac OS X.

jeffus_il
May 28th, 2012, 07:54 AM
FreeBsd is a more Unix like distro...
This may give some background...
http://www.over-yonder.net/~fullermd/rants/bsd4linux/01
and this:
http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/articles/explaining-bsd/comparing-bsd-and-linux.html
and the best is probably the Wikipedia...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix

jtarin
May 28th, 2012, 07:58 AM
I got an error message when going to a site that said it did not support my OS, and it listed it as Unix. I thought Ubuntu was Linux? What's the difference anyway?
First thing.....it's not an error. It is correctly identifying your system as being non-windows but informing you before download. if it has identified your system incorrectly it will enable you an opportunity to change it. Some websites will identify your system as Linux and some even as far as 32 or 64 bit system.
(And then whatever was said above this post):p

Shadius
May 28th, 2012, 08:03 AM
Would it be wrong to say that Unix is to Linux like DOS is to Windows?

jeffus_il
May 28th, 2012, 08:06 AM
Would it be wrong to say that Unix is to Linux like DOS is to Windows?

I would say wrong... Unix users will feel comfortable in a Linux environment whereas Dos and Windows are two completely different environments, windowing , multitasking...

Shadius
May 28th, 2012, 08:15 AM
I would say wrong... Unix users will feel comfortable in a Linux environment whereas Dos and Windows are two completely different environments, windowing , multitasking...

I was thinking like how Linux is based on Unix and how Windows is based on DOS. Wrong again?

Vereinfachen
May 28th, 2012, 08:24 AM
Yes, wrong.

Windows is the graphical environment to DOS. (the command line of Windows hasn't changed that much)

UNIX is pretty much like Linux. It has the same default commands (they are in the POSIX specification). You also could install a graphical window manager, etc...

UNIX is any operating system that implements the POSIX specification and gets certified.
Mac OS X is UNIX. Solaris a UNIX. Linux is NOT UNIX. It hasn't been certified and I believe it implements some small things different (shouldn't matter really)..

mlentink
May 28th, 2012, 08:27 AM
I was thinking like how Linux is based on Unix and how Windows is based on DOS. Wrong again?


Yes. Think of linux and unix as parallel, but very similar. In fact so similar, that much software runs on both. Whereas you would be hard put to find Windows-stuff that runs on DOS.

jtarin
May 28th, 2012, 08:29 AM
Would it be wrong to say that Unix is to Linux like DOS is to Windows?No.....but it would be incorrect.:P

Lars Noodén
May 28th, 2012, 12:41 PM
It might put things more into perspective to look at the Unix Timeline (http://www.levenez.com/unix/). It works best if you can afford to print it out an put it up on the wall to follow development more easily.

overdrank
May 28th, 2012, 12:43 PM
Moved to Recurring Discussions

Bachstelze
May 28th, 2012, 01:32 PM
Unix used to be an OS. It no longer exists, but a lot of OSes have been created that mimic the old Unix, and are generally called "Unix-like". Linux is one of them.

The term Unix nowadays refers to any OS that meets some requirements (loosely, that is "close enough" to the original Unix) and gives some money to the owners of the Unix trademark. This means that a lot of OSes that would meet the requirements are not Unix-certified because they think it's silly to pay just for the Unix label. This makes the Unix label pretty much irrelevant.

haqking
May 28th, 2012, 01:40 PM
Windows is the graphical environment to DOS. (the command line of Windows hasn't changed that much)



Not since NT which came about early 90's.

linux12
May 29th, 2012, 11:19 PM
So... does Android count as Linux too?
What about Chrome OS?

sffvba[e0rt
May 29th, 2012, 11:24 PM
So... does Android count as Linux too?
What about Chrome OS?

Both use the Linux kernel.


404

jeffus_il
May 30th, 2012, 06:40 AM
It is amazing how many devices use the Linux/Gnu kernel, cable/satelite TV decoders, access points, routers, GPS's .... The list is long... And it will move into refrigerators and many appliances... Bill Gates' dream for Windows is being realized by Linux.

Paqman
May 30th, 2012, 04:57 PM
So... does Android count as Linux too?
What about Chrome OS?

"Linux" systems are very modular. They're built by adding lots of different parts to the central Linux kernel. One set of parts is provided by GNU.

Ubuntu = GNU/Linux
Android = Android/Linux
Chrome OS = GNU/Linux

Chrome OS is a pretty standard Linux distro with some different components at the display level from traditional distros like Ubuntu or Fedora. Android uses Linux, but has a very different software stack suited for making a mobile OS.