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View Full Version : [ubuntu] Cant install Ubuntu 12.04 as a guest system with vmware work.8 on windows 7



vazduxosbra4kania
May 22nd, 2012, 02:55 PM
Hello please help! I use windows 7 64bit and have installed vmware workstation 8. I wanted to install as a guest OS through vmware a copy of ubuntu.iso. Everything goes well util i reach the place where tools are about to be installed. Appereantly i have the tools installed i checked but when i reach this part of the instalation something like a command promp appears saying that at currently my tools tools are being installed but if i wish i can use the terminal and i should wait for the graphical envirounment to load. 30 minutes have passed and nothing happened. This is not normal(i think). I can provide a screenshot later if its neccessary. Thank you in advance. Lets solve this so i can use my ubuntu without reset each time

vazduxosbra4kania
May 23rd, 2012, 07:01 AM
So nobody has ever had such a problem?!?!?!? :confused:

sikander3786
May 23rd, 2012, 08:01 AM
So nobody has ever had such a problem?!?!?!? :confused:
Probably there aren't many as a real install is preferred for many reasons.

Anyways, can you please provide us with the screenshot you promised earlier?

vazduxosbra4kania
May 23rd, 2012, 08:17 AM
Thank you so much for the response. I was losing hope :). As i am at work now i will provide the screenshot later. In the meantime can you for example tell me the top 3 reason why i should use real installed Ubuntu (may be i can reconsider vmware install). And i have 6GB Ram with real install should i use 64-bit ubuntu....?

sikander3786
May 23rd, 2012, 09:01 AM
There isn't anything like top 3 reasons because that all depends on your needs. If it is a productive system, I would go for a real install as it would be running on the actual hardware rather than in a Virtual Machine environment and would obviously perform quite better.

I didn't mean that you shouldn't go for a virtual install. You obviously know what you want to do with that install and what would be better. I meant that there aren't many people around here, probably, who might have tried installing Ubuntu in VMWare on a Windows host and thus know the solutions to what you are facing.

Later, when you provide the screenshot, we'll try to see if it is a general Ubuntu installation problem and would try to help the best way we can. But if it is a VMware specific problem, the question probably needs to go to their forums unless some other mate jumps in this thread who's got the experience. ;)

And it depends on your CPU architecture. If it is 64-bit capable, you should go for 64-bit Ubuntu. Accessing huge amounts of RAM is possible with 32-bit Ubuntu as well, as the PAE-Kernel (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/EnablingPAE) is available on the default installation image.

vazduxosbra4kania
May 23rd, 2012, 09:09 AM
There isn't anything like top 3 reasons because that all depends on your needs. If it is a productive system, I would go for a real install as it would be running on the actual hardware rather than in a Virtual Machine environment and would obviously perform quite better.

I didn't mean that you shouldn't go for a virtual install. You obviously know what you want to do with that install and what would be better. I meant that there aren't many people around here, probably, who might have tried installing Ubuntu in VMWare on a Windows host and thus know the solutions to what you are facing.

Later, when you provide the screenshot, we'll try to see if it is a general Ubuntu installation problem and would try to help the best way we can. But if it is a VMware specific problem, the question probably needs to go to their forums unless some other mate jumps in this thread who's got the experience. ;)

And it depends on your CPU architecture. If it is 64-bit capable, you should go for 64-bit Ubuntu. Accessing huge amounts of RAM is possible with 32-bit Ubuntu as well, as the PAE-Kernel (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/EnablingPAE) is available on the default installation image.

Thank you for the info.