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View Full Version : Windows user has no default privacy next to Linux



black veils
May 21st, 2012, 02:00 PM
people living together who share a computer, one uses Windows, the other uses a Linux OS like Ubuntu. the Ubuntu person can simply snoop all the Windows files, so the Windows user would have to research software to keep their files private.

(i know, no matter what, things cannot be totally private. and if there is physical access to the computer, sooner or later it can be broken into etc.)


any Windows users here in that situation? what do you use to prevent your files from being snooped by the Linux user?

thatguruguy
May 21st, 2012, 02:03 PM
What?

wyliecoyoteuk
May 21st, 2012, 02:24 PM
Truecrypt?

Lucradia
May 21st, 2012, 02:58 PM
people living together who share a computer, one uses Windows, the other uses a Linux OS like Ubuntu. the Ubuntu person can simply snoop all the Windows files, so the Windows user would have to research software to keep their files private.

(i know, no matter what, things cannot be totally private. and if there is physical access to the computer, sooner or later it can be broken into etc.)


any Windows users here in that situation? what do you use to prevent your files from being snooped by the Linux user?

Pidgin doesn't provide encryption for passwords. Neither does Windows Live Messenger:

http://developer.pidgin.im/wiki/PlainTextPasswords

So what makes you think that anything can be done?

Dragonbite
May 21st, 2012, 05:14 PM
I dunno.. I tried snooping on my wife's laptop from my laptop and while I could see my own files too easily, getting into my wife's only showed an empty folder. So now I have to find out what setting is different between hers and mine and change (mine).

On the other hand, some of it is open because Windows is trying to make it easier to share files including music and video files, with other computers in your home-group.

Otherwise I usually get asked for my username and password to get into the computer.

Dr. C
May 21st, 2012, 05:28 PM
The only way to do this is to encrypt the respective partition. With Windows this can be done, with Bitlocker or with TrueCrypt. With Ubuntu one can easilly encrypt the /home partition. By the way the Windows user can also read the GNU / Linux files http://www.howtoforge.com/access-linux-partitions-from-windows so it works both ways.

snowpine
May 21st, 2012, 05:33 PM
people living together who share a computer, one uses Windows, the other uses a Linux OS like Ubuntu. the Ubuntu person can simply snoop all the Windows files, so the Windows user would have to research software to keep their files private.

(i know, no matter what, things cannot be totally private. and if there is physical access to the computer, sooner or later it can be broken into etc.)


any Windows users here in that situation? what do you use to prevent your files from being snooped by the Linux user?

It's not "snooping"... it is a "feature not a bug" that your files are easy to recover if something bad happens, like a user gets locked out... and guess what? anyone with physical access to your machine can "snoop" your Ubuntu files too. ;)

Encryption is the best solution; there are some good suggestions above.

roelforg
May 21st, 2012, 05:36 PM
My way is to move the files to a linux system.
My most sensitive files are secured by encfs with encryption set to paranoid and a 32 char key.

ubuntu27
May 21st, 2012, 08:08 PM
Pidgin doesn't provide encryption for passwords. Neither does Windows Live Messenger:

http://developer.pidgin.im/wiki/PlainTextPasswords

So what makes you think that anything can be done?

Pidgin-OTR (http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/) encrypts the conversation. :popcorn: (Not the password though)

wilee-nilee
May 21st, 2012, 08:10 PM
people living together who share a computer, one uses Windows, the other uses a Linux OS like Ubuntu. the Ubuntu person can simply snoop all the Windows files, so the Windows user would have to research software to keep their files private.

(i know, no matter what, things cannot be totally private. and if there is physical access to the computer, sooner or later it can be broken into etc.)


any Windows users here in that situation? what do you use to prevent your files from being snooped by the Linux user?

If you think you have any privacy at all anywhere look again, you don't. :)

roelforg
May 21st, 2012, 08:14 PM
If you think you have any privacy at all anywhere look again, you don't. :)

One can get very close, though...
(my friend once called me paranoid because i had a file that was encrypted... 10 times over with different passwords (as in, i encrypted the encrypted file, repeat 10 times) and because i have 2 physical firewalls with ids on super paranoia mode)

JDShu
May 21st, 2012, 09:15 PM
My experience with the UNIX permission system (disclaimer: on solaris, although it should be the same on linux) has been quite bad, to be honest. Unless users are specifically trained to understand how permissions work, there are all sorts of annoying issues to deal with.

KiwiNZ
May 21st, 2012, 09:17 PM
Privacy is in the hands of the beholder.

wilee-nilee
May 21st, 2012, 09:17 PM
One can get very close, though...
(my friend once called me paranoid because i had a file that was encrypted... 10 times over with different passwords (as in, i encrypted the encrypted file, repeat 10 times) and because i have 2 physical firewalls with ids on super paranoia mode)

That is only protection after you have gathered it from the web. :)

szymon_g
May 21st, 2012, 09:30 PM
have you ever heard about an encryption? you can use multi-platform solutions like Truecrypt /AKA Realcrypt/ or use BittLocker/EFS (on windows only)

AllRadioisDead
May 21st, 2012, 09:32 PM
They have sharing enabled. Of course you can view their public files.

codingman
May 21st, 2012, 09:46 PM
The dumb thing about windows and linux dual-boot is that from linux, you can see all the linux files (obviously) and all the windows files too, but within windows, you can't see the linux files.


Yippee for linux!

roelforg
May 21st, 2012, 10:13 PM
That is only protection after you have gathered it from the web. :)

Did i mention that you can't even ping on my net without it showing up on my monitor?
And when stuff's encrypted pretty good, that's another wall.
My sensitive files can only be accessed by someone at the console if i'm there because i close the encrypted fs immediatly when done.

When i shut my systems down, i also kill the second firewall and the switch and i unplug the entire system (though that's because stuff's pretty loud, my room sounds better than movie effects when i flick the switch)

But, then again, i'm rather paranoid when it comes to what others are doing on/to/around my systems.
Most'll have enough by setting up a personal firewall, av, encrypted home (add an extra encrypted fs if you've got extrasensitive stuff), proper popup/ad/flash block (those are still some of the weaker points of a browser) and knowledge to avoid certain sites, know what you're installing, recognise classic virus signs, never give out personal data to every site (only if they've got good reason to ask for it, i almost never give my phone number for example) and have a good spamfilter.
That should be enough (if not overkill) for the avg. home user.

wilee-nilee
May 21st, 2012, 10:28 PM
Did i mention that you can't even ping on my net without it showing up on my monitor?
And when stuff's encrypted pretty good, that's another wall.
My sensitive files can only be accessed by someone at the console if i'm there because i close the encrypted fs immediatly when done.

When i shut my systems down, i also kill the second firewall and the switch and i unplug the entire system (though that's because stuff's pretty loud, my room sounds better than movie effects when i flick the switch)

But, then again, i'm rather paranoid when it comes to what others are doing on/to/around my systems.
Most'll have enough by setting up a personal firewall, av, encrypted home (add an extra encrypted fs if you've got extrasensitive stuff), proper popup/ad/flash block (those are still some of the weaker points of a browser) and knowledge to avoid certain sites, know what you're installing, recognise classic virus signs, never give out personal data to every site (only if they've got good reason to ask for it, i almost never give my phone number for example) and have a good spamfilter.
That should be enough (if not overkill) for the avg. home user.

If it makes you feel safe that's all that matters now isn't it, you don't have to convince me, Just your therapist. :)

If it helps to know I have my own therapist.

Frogs Hair
May 21st, 2012, 10:39 PM
I am on a Windows non sharing home network with a dual boot and none of the computers can see the contents of the others, although the map is visible. I would review the settings on the Windows computers.

KiwiNZ
May 21st, 2012, 10:41 PM
O privacy thou art lovely

roelforg
May 21st, 2012, 10:52 PM
If it makes you feel safe that's all that matters now isn't it, you don't have to convince me, Just your therapist. :)

It boiles down to:
Know your net (the biggest threat is always from within. Why else do you think i firewalled my own private subnet off of the rest of the house with a seperate firewall?)
Encrypt your stuff (with backup ofcourse)
Never give out more info then needed
Stay away from spam
Never underestimate the power of flash based ads/stuff (flash is known to be leaky so only enable it when needed, i even went so far as to disable it everywhere but youtube)
Know what to watch out for
Have a good av
Don't install everything you see (this is very true for binary packages)

So... Shrink, how much are you gonna charge me? :popcorn:

But windows actually makes it hard to do most of these things and the defaults it has have more holes in them than swiss cheese.

Lucradia
May 22nd, 2012, 03:25 AM
Privacy is in the hands of the beholder.

Wouldn't it be more along the lines of the beholder?

/lolface

roelforg
May 22nd, 2012, 06:14 AM
Wouldn't it be more along the lines of the beholder?

/lolface

Isn't it the point that you're the only beholder of your data?

Skara Brae
May 22nd, 2012, 07:25 AM
I am only little more than a n00b... And maybe this is very n00b'ish of me, but I keep my "private" files on USB flash drives (and save that somewhere safe, if need be).

I can access my Linux partitions (Ubuntu and Xubuntu) from within XP. I installed some program for that some months ago, just out of curiosity. I barely use it, though.

Dragonbite
May 22nd, 2012, 01:47 PM
If it makes you feel safe that's all that matters now isn't it, you don't have to convince me, Just your therapist. :)

If it helps to know I have my own therapist.

Only if you can trust your therapist 8-[

forrestcupp
May 22nd, 2012, 02:53 PM
It's not "snooping"... it is a "feature not a bug" that your files are easy to recover if something bad happens, like a user gets locked out... and guess what?

I completely agree. That's one of the beautiful things about Linux. I don't know how many times someone has screwed up their Windows machine, and I've plugged in a LiveUSB to back up all their precious files that they thought were gone forever. If they would have encrypted them, in some cases they would have been gone forever.

CharlesA
May 22nd, 2012, 03:30 PM
Physical access = root access. If you want your files to be unreadable, encrypt them.

forrestcupp
May 22nd, 2012, 03:43 PM
Physical access = root access. If you want your files to be unreadable, encrypt them.

Exactly. You could boot to a LiveUSB on a computer that has Ubuntu on it and alter any file you want on the root of that computer's filesystem. It's not just Windows.

Dragonbite
May 22nd, 2012, 03:53 PM
I completely agree. That's one of the beautiful things about Linux. I don't know how many times someone has screwed up their Windows machine, and I've plugged in a LiveUSB to back up all their precious files that they thought were gone forever. If they would have encrypted them, in some cases they would have been gone forever.

Same here, except it is usually ME who is screwing things up!

I haven't been encrypting my Linux system either because when I distro-hop or try and upgrade it just gets in the way.