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deonis
May 5th, 2012, 12:59 AM
I was just wondering, what is your thoughts on 12.04LTS and Unity so far. Would be nice to know what desktop environment people actually use.

mfZero
May 5th, 2012, 01:56 AM
Wonderful. Unity has officially become my favorite DE.

deonis
May 5th, 2012, 02:06 AM
glad to hear that :). Did you try Gnome-Shell?

3Miro
May 5th, 2012, 02:17 AM
This should go to testimonial.

Unity has improved enough so that I can now use it as a main DE (as opposed to XFCE). I still miss the functionality to move between workspaces with mouse only and without zoom animation, but I will figure something out.

Tamlynmac
May 5th, 2012, 02:18 AM
deonis

This is request for opinion (not support), that probably belongs in the Cafe. You might ask the staff to move it for you, should you wish to maximize the number of responses.

As for which desktop environment people use, I doubt the Linux numbers even come close to Windows. So I must assume your question is asking about Linux distros or Ubuntu versions only. You may wish to better define your request for feedback. Perhaps, requesting feedback regarding specific desktop environments and not including Windows.

Good Luck

deonis
May 5th, 2012, 02:34 AM
thanks Tamlynmac!

overdrank
May 5th, 2012, 02:36 AM
Moved to Recurring Discussions

deonis
May 5th, 2012, 02:38 AM
thanks overdrank

ratcheer
May 5th, 2012, 02:41 AM
I am enjoying it quite a bit.

Tim

zombifier25
May 5th, 2012, 03:04 AM
Awesome, however I have to leave it and move to LXDE because my computer only have 512MB and it's over 5 years old.
I'm buying a new computer soon (yay)

deonis
May 5th, 2012, 03:11 AM
How about Gnome-Shell? How does it work for you ?

zombifier25
May 5th, 2012, 04:03 AM
GNOME Shell is pretty cool. The only problems I had are the removal of Maximize and Minimize button (WTF?) which I added back with gnome-tweak-tool, and the tight integration with Mutter (and again, WTF?) which means I can't use it with Compiz.

synaptix
May 7th, 2012, 02:03 AM
Comparing to the performance of Unity/Unity2D back when it first appeared to 12.04, it's come a LONG way. Unity2D is blazing fast in 12.04 now, but I use GC/NE out of nostalgia and 2panel setup is <3.

3Miro
May 7th, 2012, 02:36 AM
How about Gnome-Shell? How does it work for you ?

It doesn't work for me. The default GS has so much functionality removed that it's baffling. You can add extensions, but extensions that come from different sources can easily conflict and the whole thing becomes too unstable to use. Mint had a mostly usable interface (they worked to resolve the conflicts and produce one interface), but I would rather stick to Ubuntu.

Many people seem to like GS, but I guess they just don't use the functionality that I use.

vasa1
May 7th, 2012, 02:46 AM
glad to hear that :). Did you try Gnome-Shell?

Your title reads Unity, but you've asked about Gnome-Shell at least twice. ??? Why not a thread about Gnome-Shell then?

heldal
May 7th, 2012, 08:22 AM
The main problem with 12.04 so far is general stability of applications. I have to look back to the previous millenium for a linux distro where I experienced this many crashes. I still prefer the old GNOME2, but unity is growing on me. A categorised list of available applications would help a lot though.

I fear that the current developments are a result of the Microsoft legacy in the ICT-industry where an entire generation of new developers have been raised in a computing culture where application restarts and even system reboots have become acceptable solutions to a problem.

kelvin spratt
May 7th, 2012, 08:35 AM
I've used both unity, and shell, unity is very buggy at present and tends to freeze. Gnome shell is the natural evaluation the extensions are excellent, you can even make you own as there is a built in tool forgot the command but it works so some feature yo want make it.
Somebody mentioned cinnamon a great attempt but its just not as good as gnome shell its got potential but lacks polish.

codemaniac
May 7th, 2012, 08:54 AM
There is so much brouhaha about Gnome Shell V/S unity .
I love both .

BigSilly
May 7th, 2012, 10:08 AM
Really enjoying it so far. Have to be honest and say I've found it buggier than I would have liked, though I think some of that is due to the Nvidia driver. Overall though, it's gorgeous, but it needs a bit of polishing up. Compared to Gnome Shell, it's a trickier call, as I really adore Gnome Shell. But I've said before I think Unity is perhaps a better fit for a desktop PC than Gnome Shell. A lot of the new features of Unity are simply stunning, such as the HUD and the new Dash Home page.

So, no big complaints, only wee niggles at the rougher edges visible. The big picture is - stunning.

KBD47
May 7th, 2012, 11:05 AM
Awesome, however I have to leave it and move to LXDE because my computer only have 512MB and it's over 5 years old.
I'm buying a new computer soon (yay)

Just curious how Unity 2D with hud disabled might run with that much ram?

traditionalist
May 7th, 2012, 11:09 AM
Could not get unity to run properly at all. Also kept crashing. Removed it and installed GNOME. Running Gnome Classic and have had no problems since.

When unity was working I found it more or less unusable. A very poor interface in my opinion.

Regards....Trad

vasa1
May 7th, 2012, 11:50 AM
Just curious how Unity 2D with hud disabled might run with that much ram?

Can HUD actually be disabled? Or are we talking about just disabling the keyboard access to HUD?

KBD47
May 7th, 2012, 11:52 AM
Using Ubuntu Tweak in Unity 2D HUD can be disabled.

zombifier25
May 7th, 2012, 12:50 PM
Just curious how Unity 2D with hud disabled might run with that much ram?

Not as fast as LXDE (which runs like lightning), but at least a little usable.

shizz
May 7th, 2012, 02:40 PM
This should go to testimonial.

Unity has improved enough so that I can now use it as a main DE (as opposed to XFCE). I still miss the functionality to move between workspaces with mouse only and without zoom animation, but I will figure something out.

Regarding changing workspaces with just your mouse, download ubuntu tweak, open it and go to tweaks then click workspace.

From here you can make either corners of the screen as a hotspot for something. I personally use the bottom right to switch workspaces and the bottom left for applications.

Give it a try.

3Miro
May 7th, 2012, 05:17 PM
Regarding changing workspaces with just your mouse, download ubuntu tweak, open it and go to tweaks then click workspace.

From here you can make either corners of the screen as a hotspot for something. I personally use the bottom right to switch workspaces and the bottom left for applications.

Give it a try.

Thanks, I am aware of those options, they just don't quite cut it.

Moving the mouse off the edge of the screen is too much mouse movement and setting the expo as a "hot spot" means that I have to go through the zoom. I have set the scroll-over-desktop to change the workspaces, but sometimes I have maximized windows and then it doesn't work.

I like something like XFCE's Workspace switcher, just one move-click and I have the new workspace. Or xfwm and OpenBox's option to leave 5 or so pixels at the edge of maximized windows letting you scroll at the very edge of the screen. I think there used to be an indicator that did that, but I don't think they have ported it to 12.04.

Copper Bezel
May 7th, 2012, 06:32 PM
I don't remember the process, but I'm pretty sure you can get tint2 to display only as a stepper thing to reserve an arbitrary number of pixels to the wallpaper as you're describing, which is a bit ugly, but functional. (I've used similar arrangements in the past with Gnome 2.) I'm glad to hear that Unity is finally working out for you otherwise, though. It seems to be turning into a good choice for power-user types. (I'm quite content with the simple-and-pretty Gnome Shell, myself, even if it's gradually falling further behind Unity in efficiency.)

malspa
May 7th, 2012, 06:50 PM
Thanks, I am aware of those options, they just don't quite cut it.

Moving the mouse off the edge of the screen is too much mouse movement and setting the expo as a "hot spot" means that I have to go through the zoom. I have set the scroll-over-desktop to change the workspaces, but sometimes I have maximized windows and then it doesn't work.

I like something like XFCE's Workspace switcher, just one move-click and I have the new workspace. Or xfwm and OpenBox's option to leave 5 or so pixels at the edge of maximized windows letting you scroll at the very edge of the screen. I think there used to be an indicator that did that, but I don't think they have ported it to 12.04.

Seems to me that moving the cursor to a hot spot and then clicking to change desktops is about the same amount of cursor movement as moving the cursor to a panel workspace switcher and then clicking to change desktops. Even in KDE, I set up "Screen Edges" for one corner to bring up the desktop grid, and I use that at least as often as I use the panel's desktop pager. Different strokes for different folks, I guess.

Ridgerunrbunny
May 7th, 2012, 07:27 PM
What Unity? my upgrade did not install it. I can't get into anything. IT SUCKS!

CharlesA
May 7th, 2012, 08:48 PM
What Unity? my upgrade did not install it. I can't get into anything. IT SUCKS!
Try creating a support thread, instead of ranting in the support area.

As for me, Unity is taking some getting used to, but it has worked well so far.

3Miro
May 7th, 2012, 08:59 PM
Seems to me that moving the cursor to a hot spot and then clicking to change desktops is about the same amount of cursor movement as moving the cursor to a panel workspace switcher and then clicking to change desktops. Even in KDE, I set up "Screen Edges" for one corner to bring up the desktop grid, and I use that at least as often as I use the panel's desktop pager. Different strokes for different folks, I guess.

Not quite.

Move over Workspace switcher -> Click on a workspace -> Move over desired window.

vs

Move to corner -> wait for the zoom -> move over the desired workspace -> click on the workspace -> wait for the zoom -> move over desired window.

Even without waiting for the zoom, this is one extra move. It is not optimal enough.

I do think it is a small issue and I am using Unity full time for work now, but I do miss the feature.

KL_72_TR
May 7th, 2012, 09:10 PM
Can somebody explain me, why do they change the keyboard shortcuts every new release?

malspa
May 8th, 2012, 05:42 AM
Move over Workspace switcher -> Click on a workspace -> Move over desired window.

vs

Move to corner -> wait for the zoom -> move over the desired workspace -> click on the workspace -> wait for the zoom -> move over desired window.

Even without waiting for the zoom, this is one extra move. It is not optimal enough.

I do think it is a small issue and I am using Unity full time for work now, but I do miss the feature.

You're right, it's one extra move. Yeah, a pager would be nice to have in Unity, even if some of us don't really miss it.

I don't get "wait for the zoom" part. Doesn't feel like I'm waiting for anything, I just move the cursor to the corner, then move the cursor to the workspace, then click, then move the cursor to the desired window.

I did have Indicator Workspaces in 11.04, but I rarely used it. I thought it was more of hassle than either a hot spot or a pager.

Shadius
May 8th, 2012, 07:00 AM
Not as fast as LXDE (which runs like lightning), but at least a little usable.

Unity on 12.04 is kind of slow for me. Is it because I'm using 512 MB RAM and a Celeron CPU? What Desktop Environment would you suggest for me given my specifications? So far, the Desktop Environments I know of are Xfce, KDE, GNOME3, LXDE. Any suggestions for my setup please? Thanks!

nikolayivanovbg
May 8th, 2012, 09:28 AM
I switch to "fallback".
Not happy at all with the new functions and look of the desktop - everything is very confusing.
I'm not new to Ubuntu (using 9.10 on my old thinkpad), but i'm still kind of "beginner".
I use it only for PHP and MySQL developing and have no time to learn new things - even they are cool.
To be honest - i don't like also the new Windows7 which was preinstalled on my new laptop - i prefer the good old XP.

New things are maybe good for teenagers and gamers, but not for conservative working people like me, sorry to say it!

Shadius
May 8th, 2012, 10:03 AM
I switch to "fallback".
Not happy at all with the new functions and look of the desktop - everything is very confusing.
I'm not new to Ubuntu (using 9.10 on my old thinkpad), but i'm still kind of "beginner".
I use it only for PHP and MySQL developing and have no time to learn new things - even they are cool.
To be honest - i don't like also the new Windows7 which was preinstalled on my new laptop - i prefer the good old XP.

New things are maybe good for teenagers and gamers, but not for conservative working people like me, sorry to say it!

What's "fallback"? I might want to try that since my experience with Unity is that it's very slow. Sometimes the Launcher wouldn't even display. It's kind of laggy.

3Miro
May 8th, 2012, 10:28 AM
Unity on 12.04 is kind of slow for me. Is it because I'm using 512 MB RAM and a Celeron CPU? What Desktop Environment would you suggest for me given my specifications? So far, the Desktop Environments I know of are Xfce, KDE, GNOME3, LXDE. Any suggestions for my setup please? Thanks!

Try XFCE or LXDE. LXDE is faster and smaller, but XFCE has more features and feels more "polished".

Fallback is basically the Gnome 2 interface ported to Gnome 3. It is not exactly like Gnome 2, but should give it a try.

3Miro
May 8th, 2012, 10:30 AM
I switch to "fallback".
Not happy at all with the new functions and look of the desktop - everything is very confusing.
I'm not new to Ubuntu (using 9.10 on my old thinkpad), but i'm still kind of "beginner".
I use it only for PHP and MySQL developing and have no time to learn new things - even they are cool.
To be honest - i don't like also the new Windows7 which was preinstalled on my new laptop - i prefer the good old XP.

New things are maybe good for teenagers and gamers, but not for conservative working people like me, sorry to say it!

You are not still using 9.10, right? Many people like fallback as it is basically the old Gnome 2, but you should also look at XFCE, you may or may not like it better.

Поздрави от отатък океана!

PaulW2U
May 8th, 2012, 10:41 AM
Unity on 12.04 is kind of slow for me. Is it because I'm using 512 MB RAM and a Celeron CPU? What Desktop Environment would you suggest for me given my specifications? So far, the Desktop Environments I know of are Xfce, KDE, GNOME3, LXDE. Any suggestions for my setup please? Thanks!

LXDE. It doesn't have the polished look of Unity, Gnome Shell or KDE but it works. It's very fast on my netbook and a great improvement on the XP installation it replaced.

With your hardware specifications I wouldn't have even installed Ubuntu/Unity. My netbook runs it fine but probably due to the 2GB of RAM that it now has.

Shadius
May 8th, 2012, 10:49 AM
Try XFCE or LXDE. LXDE is faster and smaller, but XFCE has more features and feels more "polished".

Fallback is basically the Gnome 2 interface ported to Gnome 3. It is not exactly like Gnome 2, but should give it a try.


I definitely want to give "fallback" a try given my old computer's specifications. Could you point me in the right direction on how to go about getting "fallback" on my Ubuntu?

Shadius
May 8th, 2012, 10:52 AM
LXDE. It doesn't have the polished look of Unity, Gnome Shell or KDE but it works. It's very fast on my netbook and a great improvement on the XP installation it replaced.

With your hardware specifications I wouldn't have even installed Ubuntu/Unity. My netbook runs it fine but probably due to the 2GB of RAM that it now has.

Yeah, I was debating whether to install Ubuntu on this computer, but it runs faster than the XP that it came with so that's why I stuck with it. XP was frustrating me with it's sluggishness. I thought Ubuntu would run faster.

vasa1
May 8th, 2012, 11:04 AM
If you install Gnome Tweak Tool via Synaptic or the Ubuntu Software Center, you'll be able to log in with the fallback mode.

Shadius
May 8th, 2012, 11:05 AM
If you install Gnome Tweak Tool via Synaptic or the Ubuntu Software Center, you'll be able to log in with the fallback mode.

Thank you.

vasa1
May 8th, 2012, 11:18 AM
Thank you.

When logging in, after you type in your password, you have to single-click on the gear wheel near your username, you'll see a drop-down menu. Then click on the mode you want and then hit enter.

Shadius
May 8th, 2012, 12:00 PM
When logging in, after you type in your password, you have to single-click on the gear wheel near your username, you'll see a drop-down menu. Then click on the mode you want and then hit enter.

I've installed it and followed your directions, but there aren't any modes to select when I select the drop-down menu. I'm going to move this to a support thread. I will post the link after I've created it.

Nevermind. I figured it out. I thought you meant the gear wheel after I log in, then I realized it was the Ubuntu Logo on the login screen. Loving this Gnome Classic!! I missed the two panel setup. I think I prefer that over Unity. Thanks a ton for suggesting Gnome Tweak Tool!

vasa1
May 8th, 2012, 12:21 PM
... I thought you meant the gear wheel after I log in, ...!
My bad! Anyway, good you found it and are happy!

Shadius
May 8th, 2012, 12:27 PM
My bad! Anyway, good you found it and are happy!

Very happy.:-D Noticed much better responsiveness immediately!

Ubuntu Warrior
May 8th, 2012, 01:01 PM
Pretty pleased with 12.04 and Unity. Unity takes a bit of getting used to and does require a lot of polishing and extension (too dumbed down IMO). I cannot for the life of me understand why an interface can't be feature rich to satisfy the techies/gurus and easy to use for newbies/xWindows users. You should be able to use a single interface to login, open up Firefox and read emails and do some social networking and the same interface to remote configure servers, run Landscape, serve web sites, program in Eclipse and edit large video files. A new user or an advanced user doesn't have a different interface to Gimp - nor should they need to, they both work with the same basic layout/function but the advanced user can delve down into its depths to get the juicy stuff when required.

My Unity install does tend to regularly screw up my background image and Launcher tooltips so not sure what thats about - no major showstopper but very annoying and a potential make or break for a new user.

System Spec: Dell OptiPlex 740, Dell 19in LCD Monitor, Intel Pentium 4 3GHz x 2, 1GB DDR Synchronous 533MHz RAM, 82945G/GZ Integrated Graphics Controller, NetXtreme BCM5751 Gigabit Ethernet PCI Express, NEC DVD+-RW ND-6650A, WD WD1600JS-75N 160GB ATA Disk

Shadius
May 8th, 2012, 01:09 PM
Pretty pleased with 12.04 and Unity. Unity takes a bit of getting used to and does require a lot of polishing and extension (too dumbed down IMO). I cannot for the life of me understand why an interface can't be feature rich to satisfy the techies/gurus and easy to use for newbies/xWindows users. You should be able to use a single interface to login, open up Firefox and read emails and do some social networking and the same interface to remote configure servers, run Landscape, serve web sites, program in Eclipse and edit large video files. A new user or an advanced user doesn't have a different interface to Gimp - nor should they need to, they both work with the same basic layout/function but the advanced user can delve down into its depths to get the juicy stuff when required.

My Unity install does tend to regularly screw up my background image and Launcher tooltips so not sure what thats about - no major showstopper but very annoying and a potential make or break for a new user.

System Spec: Dell OptiPlex 740, Dell 19in LCD Monitor, Intel Pentium 4 3GHz x 2, 1GB DDR Synchronous 533MHz RAM, 82945G/GZ Integrated Graphics Controller, NetXtreme BCM5751 Gigabit Ethernet PCI Express, NEC DVD+-RW ND-6650A, WD WD1600JS-75N 160GB ATA Disk

Totally agree with you that Unity should be equally usable by beginners and advanced users. I've also experienced the problem when Unity would screw up with the tooltips.

ronaldbrijo
May 8th, 2012, 01:22 PM
I replaced unity this weekend with KDE. I used to think Unity was not to bad... But have realised it stinks... KDE just seem to work and perform better. I am also able to have different desktop pictures on all my different workspaces and even on my multi screen setup..

I will not go back to Unity....

KDE rules!!!

Xusn96
May 9th, 2012, 04:14 PM
I am currently running dual boot with WIN 7 starter on an Acer Aspire ONE D255E, Atom N455 upgraded to 2GB DDR3. I installed using the WUBI windows installer and it worked flawlessly. I am happy thus far with the system although it is at times a little sluggish, but that may be the atom. I would like to move the button bar from the left side to the bottom but havent found that setting yet... :popcorn:

Shadius
May 9th, 2012, 05:10 PM
I am currently running dual boot with WIN 7 starter on an Acer Aspire ONE D255E, Atom N455 upgraded to 2GB DDR3. I installed using the WUBI windows installer and it worked flawlessly. I am happy thus far with the system although it is at times a little sluggish, but that may be the atom. I would like to move the button bar from the left side to the bottom but havent found that setting yet... :popcorn:

By "button bar", you mean the Unity Launcher? If so, I don't think Canonical intends to include a setting that allows the user to move the Unity Launcher to the bottom, but I have come across something that might help you do that.

Check here: http://www.webupd8.org/2011/10/how-to-move-unity-launcher-to-bottom-of.html

And here: http://askubuntu.com/questions/33605/can-i-move-the-unity-launcher

If you try it, let me know how it goes. :)

nikolayivanovbg
May 10th, 2012, 05:54 PM
You are not still using 9.10, right? Many people like fallback as it is basically the old Gnome 2, but you should also look at XFCE, you may or may not like it better.

Поздрави от отатък океана!
Yes, i'm still using 9.10.

It's still my main working laptop.
The new Thinkpad is still waiting for a lot of things to be installed.
For example Netbeans, Komodo Edit and so on.
ANd the most important - all my latest sources and databases are still on it.

Новият ми лаптоп всъщност дойде от оттатък океана :)

3Miro
May 10th, 2012, 06:43 PM
Yes, i'm still using 9.10.

It's still my main working laptop.
The new Thinkpad is still waiting for a lot of things to be installed.
For example Netbeans, Komodo Edit and so on.
ANd the most important - all my latest sources and databases are still on it.

Новият ми лаптоп всъщност дойде от оттатък океана :)

9.10 is no longer supported, they stopped supporting it about a year ago. You should really be using something newer. The good news is that 12.04 will now be supported for the next 5 years.

If you like something more stable and "conservative", I would recommend XFCE.

Прати лично съобщение ако имаш нужда от помощ. Добре е да се видят и други българи тук.

Xusn96
May 17th, 2012, 05:25 PM
By "button bar", you mean the Unity Launcher? If so, I don't think Canonical intends to include a setting that allows the user to move the Unity Launcher to the bottom, but I have come across something that might help you do that.

Check here: http://www.webupd8.org/2011/10/how-to-move-unity-launcher-to-bottom-of.html

And here: http://askubuntu.com/questions/33605/can-i-move-the-unity-launcher

If you try it, let me know how it goes. :)

Thanks for the info Shadius, I tried it out and due to my novice experience i managed to break my install as the normal Unity launcher disappeared and the rotated one did not appear... Oh well, I should have known better when the rotate option radio button wasnt present in the CCSM and I disabled Unity anyway thinking the button might magically appear. lesson learned. I "uninstalled" through windows control panel then reinstalled. Which leads me to a question. Since I installed with a windows installer and not on a separate partition, does that mean I am running 12.04 in a virtual mode of some kind? Or is the Windows installation the same as a separate partition install?:)

Shadius
May 17th, 2012, 06:02 PM
Thanks for the info Shadius, I tried it out and due to my novice experience i managed to break my install as the normal Unity launcher disappeared and the rotated one did not appear... Oh well, I should have known better when the rotate option radio button wasnt present in the CCSM and I disabled Unity anyway thinking the button might magically appear. lesson learned. I "uninstalled" through windows control panel then reinstalled. Which leads me to a question. Since I installed with a windows installer and not on a separate partition, does that mean I am running 12.04 in a virtual mode of some kind? Or is the Windows installation the same as a separate partition install?:)

Sorry that it broke your install. :(

To answer your question:

Since I installed with a windows installer and not on a separate partition, does that mean I am running 12.04 in a virtual mode of some kind? Or is the Windows installation the same as a separate partition install?:)
Installing using WUBI is like installing using a virtual disk, so yes you are running 12.04 in a virtual mode. You can take a look at the Wubi Guide. I've included the link.


Wubi uses a virtual disk...
Wubi Guide (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WubiGuide)

Xusn96
May 18th, 2012, 04:22 PM
@ Shadius. Well i guess that explains the sluggishness I have been attributing to my Atom proc.

alfu
May 19th, 2012, 07:04 PM
[Edit 120604] On a Toshiba Satellite A215-S4807, 12.04 cannot re-acquire a WiFi signal after a resume from suspend, and running system tests fail to determine a wifi chip is even present, with a "Job requirement not met: 'device.category == 'WIRELESS''" error.

[Edit 120528] The more I use this, the more I like it. Worth the upgrade. The crisp look of the fonts is phenomenal. Support for dual monitors is better, as is support for USB gadgets of various types: USB mouse is now solid, as is file transfer with MP3 players.

Just using 12.04 for a few days now. Everything (sound, exterior monitor, etc.) now works on my HP dv2-1030us. [Edit 120521:] apparently, from reading this forum, 12.04 is optimized for tablets. That's great, but until I get that Asus Transformer 700 (http://www.google.com/search?q=transformer+infinity+700) which won't be available here until July, I have to use it on an HP dv2-1030us. Especially impressed with the way Wine has been integrated into the OS; the Windoze apps I have tested run quite seamlessly.

I miss a few things:

1) being able to move between workspaces just by rotating the mouse wheel, as one could do in 9.04. One would hope that moving to the edge of a space and then right clicking would get you into the next space, but no such deal. Instead, we now have <CTL><ALT><arrowkey>. Yikes! Isn't there at least a function key we could press to over-ride the cursor colliding with the screen edge?

2) being able to park files up in the menubar so one could open them with one click. Admittedly, in 9.10, assigning icons to files parked there didn't work quite right, but the concept was sound. Now not even a bookmark to a file will open without first having a directory window open, and you have to go to the side of the screen and open the dock just to do that. And AFAIK, you can't park them in the dock either. (Tip: Windows 'super' key will open the dock without having to mouse to it, and there are other key shortcuts, too.)

3) being able to click a button on the bottom of the screen to select an open window. <ALT><TAB> is time-consuming, because it is serial access, not parallel access. Yes, we can click tick marks in Unity if an app has multiple open windows, but that is more steps. Note to programmers: mousing to the screen edge takes time to do anything. Explore the possibility of right-click pop-up menus.

4) being able to access absolutely any file on the computer from the Apple menu with one click and stroke of the mouse (by putting alia of the drive partitions into the Apple menu). Whoops, sorry, that was Mac OS 8.4 over ten years ago. I just have to get used to the fact that no-one writing for Linux has picked up on that.

5) being able to park the dock on whatever edge of the screen one likes

6) being able to acquire a WiFi signal instantly, the way my 2002 iBook can

7) being able to toggle the file directory Sidebar without the tedious selection of 'menubar/View/Sidebar/places or tree'. Right-click in the sidebar. Nothing happens. Why couldn't that toggle the sidebar view mode? For that matter, more menu items should be in the right-click file window pop-up menu: 'View icons/list/compact' and 'View sidebar places/tree', for starters.

8 ) being able to hit <ESC> to close a window or basically get back out of anything. I appreciate that at least Unity does close on <ESC>.

9) being able to view a spinning wheel or any feedback at all that your mouseclick had initiated an action (such as entering password upon login, or launching an app). My left mousebutton is getting mechanically a bit iffy, and not having click feedback does not help.

10) being able to hear audio files in a directory just by hovering over them

11) the world clock with mini weather reports in the upper right menu bar. I know, it was a bit over the top and had to make way for more functionality elsewhere, but I miss it.

The key shortcuts available in pop-up menus from a right-mouseclick don't work the way they used to. They select the correct menu choice, but do no longer activate it. Renaming a file is particularly cumbersome compared to Win or MacOS.

The spacing between icons in a directory listing (Nautilus?) is far too wide -- at the maximum size, they only make up one column!

Why isn't the Launcher identified as the 'Unity Launcher' in 'System Settings'? It took me a while on this forum to find out what 'Unity' was. Call me lazy, but I am still unclear what it actually comprises, and how it is differentiated from 'Nautilus', 'shell' and all of the other pet names for functionalities in Linux.

The Gimp loses focus on the image editing window when any operation is done. You have to click in the title bar to get it to come back to the foreground. I find this tedious.

Permissions are still frustrating. I partitioned and formatted an 8GB USB flash drive with gPartEd, and found that only 'root' had permission to access it. Reformatted with the Disk Utility, it worked fine. Overall, the Disk Utility seems superior to gPartEd.

roelforg
May 19th, 2012, 07:27 PM
That i like 11.10 unity much better then 12.04.
And as i don't see any reasons to upgrade yet, i'm fine with 11.10

It's just the minor things like hiding the launcher in the 11.10 way (i like that).

holiday
May 19th, 2012, 08:09 PM
I am going back to 10.04 until Ubuntu gets these so many issues worked out.

The degradation of workspace integrity was a killer for me. The autohide of the launcher was flaky but I found a workaround.

Overall I could work with it once the bugs are worked out. I'm too busy to fuss with google and these forums. I have work to do and Ubuntu has supported me well so far.

After that, I find it too flashy - too hot. I prefer a cool UI.

And I have to have tight and enclosed workspaces like we used to have. Ideally workspaces would be so independent that they can have their own wallpaper. I work in a number of roles and I use workspaces to keep my projects separate.

I appreciate the direction, but I'm a working man.

I imagine that the Ubuntu developers want to be ahead of the curve when the desktop becomes obsolete so they are beta testing their tablet UI.

But the desktop will not become obsolete. I work with three big screens and I need each one of them. There is no way that a tablet can replace that.

3Miro
May 20th, 2012, 06:12 AM
Just using 12.04 for a few days now. At least everything (sound, exterior monitor, etc.) now works on my HP dv2-1030us, but I have some gripes. I miss:

1) being able to move between workspaces just by rotating the mouse wheel, as one could do in 9.04. One would hope that moving to the edge of a space and then right clicking would get you into the next space, but no such deal. Instead, we now have <CTL><ALT><arrowkey>. Yikes!

2) being able to park files up in the menubar so one could open them with one click. Now not even a bookmark to a file will open without first having a directory window open, and you have to go to the side of the screen and open the dock just to do that. And AFAIK, you can't park them in the dock either.

3) being able to click a button on the bottom of the screen to select an open window. <ALT><TAB> is time-consuming, because it is serial access, not parallel access.

4) being able to access absolutely any file on the computer from the Apple menu with one click and stroke of the mouse. Whoops, sorry, that was Mac OS 8.4 over ten years ago. I just have to get used to the fact that no-one writing for Linux is that clever.

5) being able to park the dock on whatever edge of the screen one likes

6) being able to acquire a WiFi signal instantly, the way my 2002 iBook can

7) being able to toggle the file directory Sidebar without the tedious selection of 'menubar/View/Sidebar/places or tree'. Right-click in the sidebar. Nothing happens. Why couldn't that toggle the sidebar view mode?

1) You can still do that, just install CCSM and set the shortcuts the way you wanted them (also Ctr+Alt+Arrow was in 9.04 as well).

3) You can switch between opened windows with the Unity bar on the left, I hardly ever use Alt+Tab.

4) What do you mean "absolutely any file". This sounds like Macbook Wheel.

6) This is a hardware thing, I have almost instant wifi signal on my laptop.

wolfen69
May 20th, 2012, 06:18 AM
1) You can still do that, just install CCSM and set the shortcuts the way you wanted them (also Ctr+Alt+Arrow was in 9.04 as well).

3) You can switch between opened windows with the Unity bar on the left, I hardly ever use Alt+Tab.

4) What do you mean "absolutely any file". This sounds like Macbook Wheel.

6) This is a hardware thing, I have almost instant wifi signal on my laptop.

You tell 'em 3M. ;)

My experience has been pretty good. The only reason I switched to KDE, is because I'm bored. Every DE works good for me, and I can use every one just fine. I just get bored and like to try new things. Heck, Xubuntu may be next. Already have Lubuntu on my netbook. I keep the same home folder and just switch OS's. Easy.

carl4926
May 20th, 2012, 06:32 AM
You tell 'em 3M. ;)

My experience has been pretty good. The only reason I switched to KDE, is because I'm bored. Every DE works good for me, and I can use every one just fine. I just get bored and like to try new things. Heck, Xubuntu may be next. Already have Lubuntu on my netbook. I keep the same home folder and just switch OS's. Easy.

I'm the same and I just like tinkering.
I'm on my netbook now and have both Ubuntu and xubuntu
Funny thing is, Ubuntu is just better, I mean it works better, feels better.
If I use kde on this it's a bit slow.

Back on topic, 12.04 is really nice and no problems so far except getting 'clipit' working, which was a simple edit.

wolfen69
May 20th, 2012, 07:23 AM
If I use kde on this it's a bit slow.



Well duh. Lubuntu does OK on my netbook, but I couldn't imagine KDE on it. Why not just go windows 7 Premium? ;)

carl4926
May 20th, 2012, 07:26 AM
Why not just go windows 7 Premium? ;)
Funny

woxuxow
May 20th, 2012, 07:53 AM
It's perfect to me (unity and ubuntu 12.04) it is what i have ever expect
the best DE i have ever saw

Luckiboy
May 20th, 2012, 08:17 AM
I really like Xubuntu 12.04. The most pleasant change in 12.04 in comparison to 11.10, allacarte is preinstalled! In 12.04, I was messing with it. It's over now!

PierreDeKat
May 20th, 2012, 04:43 PM
I uninstalled it and went back to 10.04.

Ubuntu has "jumped the shark", and if they don't turn things around, I think the Ubuntu project is pretty much doomed.

Ubuntu Linux losing popularity fast. New Unity interface to blame? (http://royal.pingdom.com/2011/11/23/ubuntu-linux-losing-popularity-fast-new-unity-interface-to-blame/)

My personal complaints with 12.04, in no particular order:

* People don't want to spend an hour downloading language packs(!) during installation. Many are actually sitting there praying, PRAYING, that grub works the way that they are hoping, but ... just ... wait ... a ... couple ... more ... hours ... for ... the ... latest ... language ... pack ... updates ... to ... download ... before ... you ... can ... see ... if ... you ... have ... to ... start ... all ... over ... again ...
* Some people need a desktop, not just a wallpaper. Why, oh, why would the Ubuntu folks think it would be a good idea to kill the computer desktop?!
* That launcher thingy over on the left side takes up WAY too much real estate. With Gnome 2, I can have the exact same thing, but I can autohide it.
* WTF? Price tags in the Ubuntu software center?
* Okay, assuming the Ubuntu folks are getting kickbacks from the for-sale software companies and/or Paypal, are they also getting kickbacks from the NSA for setting Ubuntu users up with zeitgeist?

CharlesA
May 20th, 2012, 05:00 PM
I uninstalled it and went back to 10.04.

Ubuntu has "jumped the shark", and if they don't turn things around, I think the Ubuntu project is pretty much doomed.

Ubuntu Linux losing popularity fast. New Unity interface to blame? (http://royal.pingdom.com/2011/11/23/ubuntu-linux-losing-popularity-fast-new-unity-interface-to-blame/)

There is no way to use Gnome Classic instead of Unity on 12.04, right?


* People don't want to spend an hour downloading language packs(!) during installation. Many are actually sitting there praying, PRAYING, that grub works the way that they are hoping, but ... just ... wait ... a ... couple ... more ... hours ... for ... the ... latest ... language ... pack ... updates ... to ... download ... before ... you ... can ... see ... if ... you ... have ... to ... start ... all ... over ... again ...

I must have missed something. On the installs I have done, even with garbage internet, the language packs don't take that long to download. You can skip it too.


* Some people need a desktop, not just a wallpaper. Why, oh, why would the Ubuntu folks think it would be a good idea to kill the computer desktop?!

I have files on the desktop. Do you want shortcuts or launchers on the desktop? Use the dock instead.


* That launcher thingy over on the left side takes up WAY too much real estate. With Gnome 2, I can have the exact same thing, but I can autohide it.

Last I checked you can autohide the Unity dock.


* WTF? Price tags in the Ubuntu software center?

* Okay, assuming the Ubuntu folks are getting kickbacks from the for-sale software companies and/or Paypal, are they also getting kickbacks from the NSA for setting Ubuntu users up with zeitgeist?

What do you base this "kickbacks" assumption on? The fact that software center has software you need to pay to use? This has been around for a while now.

Simian Man
May 20th, 2012, 05:47 PM
I tried Unity for the first time since it came out with 12.04. It was replaced with KDE in half an hour. KDE is the only major desktop that still actually gives users the ability to decide how they want their system to look and work.

diesch
May 20th, 2012, 06:11 PM
I uninstalled it and went back to 10.04.

Ubuntu has "jumped the shark", and if they don't turn things around, I think the Ubuntu project is pretty much doomed.

Ubuntu Linux losing popularity fast. New Unity interface to blame? (http://royal.pingdom.com/2011/11/23/ubuntu-linux-losing-popularity-fast-new-unity-interface-to-blame/)


This are quite old news. Those numbers are just visitor counts for the Ubuntu page at DistroWatch. People don't visit that page any more as Ubuntu is well known and there are plenty of other resources about Ubuntu around.

If you look at the WikiMedia Web stats (http://stats.wikimedia.org/wikimedia/squids/SquidReportOperatingSystems.htm) you see Ubuntu is still far ahead of any other Linux distro.

PierreDeKat
May 20th, 2012, 08:30 PM
There is no way to use Gnome Classic instead of Unity on 12.04, right?
Well, actually, if you install Gnome Panel, you only get one panel. I like having two, and there is no easy way (GUI or dialog) to add a second panel. I am sure there is a way to add a second panel, but after discovering the death of the desktop, I just bailed on the whole deal.


I must have missed something. On the installs I have done, even with garbage internet, the language packs don't take that long to download. You can skip it too.
Well, I live in a "Third World Country", so internet service is not on par with the "First World's" broadband.

Yes, you can "Skip" the download if you frantically start clicking on the GUI. That's when you are presented with the option to "Skip" the download.

But for folks who don't frantically click on the GUI, they end up sitting there and waiting for however long it takes for the downloads to complete, because they didn't figure out there was a frantically-click-on-the-GUI-to-Skip-this-step option.


I have files on the desktop. Do you want shortcuts or launchers on the desktop? Use the dock instead.
I want to be able to create custom launchers from scratch, create folders from scratch, create documents from scratch, etc.

How do you even get a folder onto your wallpaper/desktop? I tried dragging a folder there, I and was told that it couldn't be done.

CharlesA
May 20th, 2012, 08:40 PM
Well, actually, if you install Gnome Panel, you only get one panel. I like having two, and there is no easy way (GUI or dialog) to add a second panel. I am sure there is a way to add a second panel, but after discovering the death of the desktop, I just bailed on the whole deal.

I just drag the folder/file to the Desktop from Nautilus.

Do you mean the panel at the top and bottom of the screen?



I want to be able to create custom launchers from scratch, create folders from scratch, create documents from scratch, etc.

How do you even get a folder onto your wallpaper/desktop? I tried dragging a folder there, I and was told that it couldn't be done.

I can right click on the desktop and create folder/document. I haven't figured out if you can put launchers on the desktop or not.

diesch
May 20th, 2012, 09:52 PM
I can right click on the desktop and create folder/document. I haven't figured out if you can put launchers on the desktop or not.

You can put launchers on the desktop, too. Drag it from the Dash on the desktop ot use some other program to create a .desktop file, put it on desktop and make it executable.

curts
May 20th, 2012, 10:13 PM
I did a clean install of 11.04 alongside my 10.04 partition. I was not impressed with Unity, indeed 11.04 as a whole, and abandoned my migration from 10.04. I upgraded to 11.10, still wasn't impressed with Unity, but kept going back to it periodically to give it another chance after the suspend bug was fixed. After installing several tweaks it was a little more palatable, but I still wasn't happy with it.

Unity was also sluggish on my single core PC with 1 GB RAM and 2 GB swap. The system would start to thrash above 50% swap and not behave well. I recently added another 2 GB RAM, which helped, but Unity still felt sluggish, especially ALT-TAB.

After upgrading from 11.10 to 12.04, I'm still not impressed with Unity for a desktop environment, so this weekend I started looking at alternatives. I discovered Unity 2D ran better, but I went ahead and installed the gnome shell and tried it. After installing a handful of extensions and tweaking a few settings, I'm happier with Gnome 3.4 after 24 hrs. than I've ever been with Unity as my desktop environment. Happy enough that I'll now consider resuming my migration from 10.04.

I can see how Unity is optimized for a tablet environment, but that doesn't translate into a good desktop work and/or serious gaming environment. Many casual PC users may migrate to tablets and for them the "death of the desktop" may make perfect sense and happy to not look back, but no tablet is ready to replace my desktop. Eventually augment it, perhaps, but not replace it anytime soon.

PierreDeKat
May 20th, 2012, 10:17 PM
Do you mean the panel at the top and bottom of the screen?
Correct. With the "Classic Gnome" option in 12.04, I could only get one Gnome panel on top of the Unity wallpaper/desktop.

I even installed Gconf-editor hoping it would give me some more Gnome panel options, except that about 95% of the settings in Gconf-editor have been superseded by the Unity working environment.


I can right click on the desktop and create folder/document. I haven't figured out if you can put launchers on the desktop or not.
Wow, that's weird. I tried right-clicking on the desktop, Alt-right-clicking, exploring the keyboard shortcuts, and so on with no results. No matter what I tried, I couldn't get any sort of right-click menu to create a folder or document.

holiday
May 20th, 2012, 11:00 PM
A big problem is that many people have been using Ubuntu as a work tool. I keep a Ubuntu VM on my work-mandated Windows7. We do most of our work through VM-based consoles onto Solaris zones on our client's VPN. But we have to have W7 for MS Office and since we have no say in the matter the deal is done.

I use Ubuntu as my connection to home. I can get music from home and hide it in the VM. My employer scans our drives for suspicious content,but I doubt they're probing into VM disks.

Through an XSession I can set up torrents for my evening's entertainment.

So ok, Ubuntu is a tool I'm using at work - and then suddenly it goes nuts! What is this? My screen is either totally empty or it's full of balloons.

10.04 is a functioning desktop. And we do need a functioning desktop. I am grateful for it and I thank Ubuntu for their continuing support of it.

CharlesA
May 20th, 2012, 11:21 PM
Correct. With the "Classic Gnome" option in 12.04, I could only get one Gnome panel on top of the Unity wallpaper/desktop.

I even installed Gconf-editor hoping it would give me some more Gnome panel options, except that about 95% of the settings in Gconf-editor have been superseded by the Unity working environment.


Wow, that's weird. I tried right-clicking on the desktop, Alt-right-clicking, exploring the keyboard shortcuts, and so on with no results. No matter what I tried, I couldn't get any sort of right-click menu to create a folder or document.

Looks right to me. Clean install of Precise x64 with gnome-panel installed.

PierreDeKat
May 21st, 2012, 12:24 AM
Looks right to me. Clean install of Precise x64 with gnome-panel installed.
Wow, that's weird. I did a clean install of 12.04 32-bit and Gnome Panel, but all I could get was the top panel. Maybe I had trouble with a bug or something.

And you say you can create folders on your desktop? If so, then I definitely had a bad install/experience with 12.04 and/or Gnome Classic.

Maybe I'll give it another go one of these days and see if I run into the same issues.

Thanks.

cariboo
May 21st, 2012, 03:42 AM
I tried Unity for the first time since it came out with 12.04. It was replaced with KDE in half an hour. KDE is the only major desktop that still actually gives users the ability to decide how they want their system to look and work.

You forgot to add In my opinion :)

Simian Man
May 21st, 2012, 10:24 PM
You forgot to add In my opinion :)

Part of it is personal preference, but part of it is objective too. KDE undeniably is more configurable than Unity. Especially if you only count configuration options that are available in the default GUI.

MadmanRB
May 23rd, 2012, 09:11 AM
12.04 doesnt seem as stable as 11.10 as there are constant error reports, plus I liked the older unity when doge windows was available and I didnt have to use a 3rd party plugin for it.
Unity has taken one step forward and one step back overall, I still prefer KDE due to how flexible it is.

Copper Bezel
May 23rd, 2012, 09:51 AM
I actually haven't had any stability problems with 12.04 other than one random Gnome Shell freeze that I had to kill X to escape. Since it's only happened once and I can't reproduce it, I can't really count it yet. My transitions to 11.04 and to 11.10 were substantially less smooth.

I'm very happy with 12.04. At least under Shell, it's been nothing but bug fixes and new features. The only drawbacks have been the broken compatibilities with themes and extensions, and it feels like a real upgrade.

I haven't tried Unity yet, but I intend to. It looks very nice in 12.04 as well - the HUD and the performance increases are really going to improve the experience.

Edit: Correction: I do have a problem where Shell does not read any assigned keyboard shortcuts for window management features, whether those I'd set under 11.10 or new ones. I can't find a bug for it, so I'm assuming that it has something to do with the upgrade path. Very annoying.

aditkoel
May 23rd, 2012, 12:40 PM
once I installed it, i could play video smoothly, but after installing ati fglrx (radeon hd 3200) I found difficulties in playing videos...now I have to use gnome cassic with no single effect to be able to play videos...I also use KDE plasma, but I have to deactivate the visual effects to play my videos smoothly

O2Blevel
May 31st, 2012, 01:31 AM
I liked the look of Unity the first time I saw it. At that time I didn't know a thing about Unity or Ubuntu, but within a few days I decided to give it a try. I did a wubi install of Ubuntu 11.10. For me that was a really pleasant experience, could hardly believe how easy it was to use 11.10 (can never get their names straight so I just use the release number). Ubuntu 12.04, has provided a few more challenges, but nothing major, so all things considered I like it and plan to use it as my full time home-based computer.

diesch
May 31st, 2012, 07:37 AM
I tried right-clicking on the desktop, Alt-right-clicking, exploring the keyboard shortcuts, and so on with no results. No matter what I tried, I couldn't get any sort of right-click menu to create a folder or document.

In Gnome the right click menu and desktop icons are disabled by default. Run

gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.background show-desktop-icons trueto enable them.

alfu
June 5th, 2012, 09:41 PM
A very good experience except for the fact that the network manager is STILL buggy.

Failure to re-acquire wireless signal after resuming from 'suspend', locking out the wireless physical push-push switch on boot or resume, asking repeatedly for a password to get on a wireless channel even though it had a correct password, are all instances I have noticed on two different, very mainstream laptops (Toshiba & HP). And the connection always seems very slow (i will admit to getting only 2 signal bars out of 4 in my location).

Apps: Movie player won't play iPhone videos (.MOV), but VLC media player will. I wish there was a 'take another screenshot' button in the final window of 'Screenshot'. You have to re-launch it every time you want to shoot the screen.

GnomeMax
June 6th, 2012, 12:21 AM
Frustrated. Everything else never made it through my filter.

I have lots of well powered Windows XP machines that are all set to need a new OS in 24 months. I was expecting to use Ubuntu, but Unity is a show stopper.

Business use. Tech use. These are not functions of the Unity desktop. I am not going to put my users through a migration to Unity and then spend all my time on support calls ("where is ...?" - fill in the blank). Unity is trying to be a tablet, but these are not tablets.

I came to Ubuntu years ago because of stability. I was tired of distros that run the bleeding edge - maybe it works, maybe not (think Fedora). I was happy with Ubuntu because I could give it to users right off the disk and they were immediately productive. The interface was intuitive. Right 'out of the box' it was clean and quick.

Now my choice, if I stick with Ubuntu, is to plan on huge support costs or build a modified distro without Unity. Bad choices either way. The solution appears to be to find another distro. Or follow Linus (but that's back to a modified install).

Frustrating. Irritating beyond belief. My 10.10 will have to run a while longer while I reinvent the wheel. So sad.

craig10x
June 6th, 2012, 07:14 AM
Try Zorin 6....Ubuntu 12.04 with a non-unity DE that is very nice...
RC currently out...take a look (link to it in their blog section)

If you like, wait for final release to install (which will come in 32 bit and 64 bit)...
If you don't like the windows 7 style in the slab menu, there is about a dozen others to choose from (by right clicking on the menu on the panel)...

Runs smooth, snappy and quite attractive looking too :)

It is great for both newbies coming over from windows and experienced linux users alike...

c2tarun
June 6th, 2012, 07:20 AM
When using Unity on previous releases, I was kind of not liking Unity.
I personally configured my look and feel like Mac and was using Classic version.
When I installed 12.04 I was amazed with its speed and smoothness :) it was just like mac(or somewhere near mac ;) )
I started using Unity and I was feeling like OK,OK then I found a video on youtube over unity. That video showed me some really cool keyboard shorcuts, from that day I fell in love with Unity, its stability, smoothness and animations. Fantastic :)

CharlesA
June 6th, 2012, 07:16 PM
Frustrated. Everything else never made it through my filter.

I have lots of well powered Windows XP machines that are all set to need a new OS in 24 months. I was expecting to use Ubuntu, but Unity is a show stopper.

Business use. Tech use. These are not functions of the Unity desktop. I am not going to put my users through a migration to Unity and then spend all my time on support calls ("where is ...?" - fill in the blank). Unity is trying to be a tablet, but these are not tablets.

I came to Ubuntu years ago because of stability. I was tired of distros that run the bleeding edge - maybe it works, maybe not (think Fedora). I was happy with Ubuntu because I could give it to users right off the disk and they were immediately productive. The interface was intuitive. Right 'out of the box' it was clean and quick.

Now my choice, if I stick with Ubuntu, is to plan on huge support costs or build a modified distro without Unity. Bad choices either way. The solution appears to be to find another distro. Or follow Linus (but that's back to a modified install).

Frustrating. Irritating beyond belief. My 10.10 will have to run a while longer while I reinvent the wheel. So sad.
Use a different DE then. Unity isn't the end-all-be-all standard.

There is always Gnome Classic, XFCE, LXDE, KDE, etc.

ExSuSEusr
June 7th, 2012, 02:40 AM
Ubuntu gives me headaches when it comes to installing on a desktop.

On laptops - it's a dream. It installs faster and smoother than Windows (as far as I am concerned).

As for Unity. I hated it at first, now I really like it.

3rdalbum
June 7th, 2012, 11:07 AM
Business use. Tech use. These are not functions of the Unity desktop. I am not going to put my users through a migration to Unity and then spend all my time on support calls ("where is ...?" - fill in the blank). Unity is trying to be a tablet, but these are not tablets.

I came to Ubuntu years ago because of stability. I was tired of distros that run the bleeding edge - maybe it works, maybe not (think Fedora). I was happy with Ubuntu because I could give it to users right off the disk and they were immediately productive. The interface was intuitive. Right 'out of the box' it was clean and quick.

Now my choice, if I stick with Ubuntu, is to plan on huge support costs or build a modified distro without Unity. Bad choices either way. The solution appears to be to find another distro.

Maybe you're giving your users too little credit, and assuming that everything else non-Ubuntu is going to stay the same. Your choices are:

a. Switch to Gnome 3 and retrain anyway
b. Switch to Windows 8 and retrain anyway
c. Switch to KDE, XFCE etc and retrain anyway
d. Install Gnome Fallback Session and when it gets obsoleted too (soon, probably) switch to something else again and retrain anyway
e. Install Windows 7 and stay there until 2020, and watch it (and your users) getting eaten alive by security problems toward the end of its life. Oh, and retrain anyway.
f. Use Unity and retrain.

Your users might like Unity. They might find it comfortable, and interesting, and easy to use. A lot of people do. Don't just assume "I tried Unity for five minutes and I didn't know where anything was, so I hated it; therefore my idiot users will feel the same way".

I don't get this whole "Unity is for tablets" meme. What's your definition of "tablet UI"? If your definition is "finger-touchable icons", then I guess Unity is for tablets. But then so are Mac OS X and KDE. That can't be the correct definition of "tablet UI".

But if you take a closer look you'll find that Android, iOS and Windows 8 don't have windowing. Windows 7, Mac OS X, KDE, Gnome, Unity etc all have windowing. Therefore, the difference between a tablet UI and a desktop UI is the presence of windows. And Unity is a desktop UI.

Copper Bezel
June 8th, 2012, 05:55 AM
Objection! Windows 8 and Gnome Shell are intended as cross-form-factor OSs, and Windows 8 does have windowing (if not traditional windowing.) Sort of had to, I guess, or they'd need to change the name.

GnomeMax
June 8th, 2012, 09:34 PM
Thanks to all who offered suggestions to my quandry about Unity.

Forgive me, but all of you missed the mark. In the business world things cost money. Any who would like to cut me a check so that I don't have to spend limited business resources on a retraining scenario that should not have to happen, please let me know.

Gnome 3, Unity, KDE 4, Windows 8, etc... all of these miss the mark because all of these options are trying to position themselves for the upcoming transition to touch and tablets. Monitors are all going wide screen (for a reason). Why in the world would you then create a DE that chops off a whole side of the monitor? From all the press out there it is pretty clear - the reason is touch and tablets. The problem is that business is not going to migrate to touch and tablets any time soon. See Apple's discussion on their tablet vs their laptop. For more complaints about functionality and getting work done, see the posts (not here) from Linus.

Now, I will be the first to admit that I am getting tablets and phones on my networks as users bring their own devices from home. That is another issue I need to deal with in the realm of security. But, those devices do not (and will not for the near future) replace any of these user's primary system for getting work done.

Taking Ubuntu and modifying the DE is, in my opinion, reinventing the wheel. I am not in the business of building distros. It might be fun ;-), but I have enough to do without adding another layer of obfuscation. Again, this is business, and business runs on dollars. Add more process and you add more dollars. I repeat the request for checks if someone wants to fund that transition.

I appreciate the information that others have provided about other distros to consider, and I will definitely check them out. But, right now I'm actually going back to Ubuntu's roots. There's a reason that Ubuntu is solid, and it comes from where they began: Debian.

CharlesA
June 9th, 2012, 12:43 AM
This might be a good read for you:
http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/23051/how-long-will-debian-be-supporting-gnome-2

There will always be a need to learn how to use a new interface/GUI.

malspa
June 9th, 2012, 05:13 AM
Gnome 3, Unity, KDE 4, Windows 8, etc... all of these miss the mark because all of these options are trying to position themselves for the upcoming transition to touch and tablets.

[...]

But, right now I'm actually going back to Ubuntu's roots. There's a reason that Ubuntu is solid, and it comes from where they began: Debian.

Debian -- not a bad thought if you don't like what Ubuntu's doing with Unity, GNOME 3, etc.

Of course, the next Debian Stable will have GNOME 3. And KDE4 is also an option. You could always use Xfce or something else, of course.

Then again, you could always use Xfce or something else with Ubuntu (typing this from Openbox in Ubuntu 12.04).

I run Debian here and can't see myself ever not having a running Debian installation. I also run Ubuntu, and there things about Ubuntu that I like better than Debian. I'd rather not choose between one or the other, so instead I take advantage of what both have to offer.

As to the title of the thread, 12.04 and Unity have been great here so far.

alfu
August 20th, 2012, 11:38 PM
Workaround for the Network Manager not finding a wi-fi signal on resume from Suspend:

1) Under the networking icon, select 'Enable Networking' to disable it.
2) Suspend, either by selecting it under the System settings icon, or closing the lid.
3) Resume, by either opening the lid or hitting a key.
4) The Network Manager should now recover your wi-fi signal.

alfu
August 20th, 2012, 11:50 PM
4) What do you mean "absolutely any file". This sounds like Macbook Wheel.

In Mac OS 8 or so, if you put an alias of a hard drive into your Apple menu folder in the System folder, and enabled hierarchical menus, you could click on the Apple menu and then sweep down to any file, no matter how deep it was in a directory.

When you released the mouse button, it opened with its designated app.

ryantierp
August 21st, 2012, 10:23 AM
Hi
I'm using it on both my regular desktop with dual screens and on the rest of the families laptops. However, when first installed it does lack features that have to bee bolted on after installation such as the ability to tweak settings, gdebi and synaptic just to mention a few.

I've been using Linux for 5 years and coming from a windows environment it has been a great exeriance and journey so far. Expect for the fact that during certain distribution upgrades support for things have been broken ie, wifi and peripals.

It also tends to have become more resource hungry which have forced me to choose another dist for the in car computer that are under development. Unity does not work well on 7" touchscreens.

Other than that, keep up the good work and Iíll keep on working on my surroundings so they finally take the plunge to Ubuntu godness.

Ariya243
August 24th, 2012, 02:54 AM
Forgive me, but all of you missed the mark. In the business world things cost money.

Taking Ubuntu and modifying the DE is, in my opinion, reinventing the wheel. I am not in the business of building distros. It might be fun ;-), but I have enough to do without adding another layer of obfuscation. Again, this is business, and business runs on dollars. Add more process and you add more dollars.

Well friend, how much is 0$ for you?

How much is 0$ for a operating system and how much is 0$ for a word processor, etc for you?

How much is one hour with a coffee at home cost you to use apt-get install and apt-get remove or using Synaptic?
How much would cost you to install Remastersys and make your Custom CD?

Even, if you have 100 computers at work, how much would 0X100$ for you?

And how much would 100 copies of proprietary OS would cost you, even at discounted package price?

Have a nice day!;)

thatguruguy
August 24th, 2012, 03:07 AM
-snip-

Just realized that I was responding to a 3-month old post. My apologies.

alfu
October 16th, 2012, 01:44 AM
When the home folder sidebar view is set to 'Tree', other partitions on the HDD are completely invisible (they are visible in the 'Places' view).

They are not found in 'media' nor in 'mnt' (they are visible in the 'mnt' directory in Android). You have to toggle to the 'Places' view in order to mount them in 12.04.

I think a toggle for the sidebar view between 'Places' and 'Tree', as well as the 'List/Icon/Compact' view switch, should be in the window right-click pop-up menu, not in the menubar.