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ubiquitin.jf
April 30th, 2012, 12:41 PM
I've just installed Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on my main desktop PC and decided to rummage around the "Example Content" symlinked to the live environment desktop, as in all the years I've used Ubuntu (since 4.10) I've never bothered looking.

Inside that folder is a brief and minimalistic video titled "How fast.ogg" (it's in /usr/share/example-content/Ubuntu_Free_Culture_Showcase on an installed copy) which makes the claim that Ubuntu can boot in 10 seconds. Intrigued, I installed Bootchart and found that it takes 23.52 seconds to boot on my machine which is no dinosaur, but no Deep Blue either (most notably I lack an SSD).

So under what magical conditions does a fresh Ubuntu install boot in 10 seconds? Is it that fast for anybody here or is it more an aspirational figure which the devs would like to see some day?

Bucky Ball
April 30th, 2012, 12:46 PM
Well, I did a minimal install that was getting to the login screen in 12 seconds consistently, but there were very few apps installed (and xfce4 rather than Gnome). I think that was 10.04 mini.iso. No other install of mine has ever gotten anywhere near that (although I think my 11.04 boots in about 20 seconds to login). I have an i3 with 4Gb of RAM.

TheMTtakeover
April 30th, 2012, 01:20 PM
Does anyone have an SSD? I'm sure that would get under 10 seconds or right around there.

cecilpierce
April 30th, 2012, 01:32 PM
Ha! It takes almost 10 secs for my HD to start after selecting from grub, getting slower every day it seems ):P

vasa1
April 30th, 2012, 01:52 PM
I imagine it would be somewhat more useful if people mention their CPU specs.

wyliecoyoteuk
April 30th, 2012, 01:57 PM
Acer Aspire One,original L110, Atom 1.6ghz, new faster SSD,tweakes for SSD loading 11 seconds.:)

BrokenKingpin
April 30th, 2012, 02:01 PM
I am running Xubuntu 12.04 on an SSD on a pretty fast PC. If you exclude the BIOS post and grub it does get to the login screen in about 10 seconds, maybe slightly longer. As for boot times I am pretty happy with this, even on my non-SSD machine.

I will vote yes as it is close enough :P.

Dry Lips
April 30th, 2012, 02:39 PM
Does anyone have an SSD? I'm sure that would get under 10 seconds or right around there.

Yes, my spare computer uses around 11,3 seconds from the grub to the login screen... It runs Mint 12 KDE. But I think the boot record is stored on the normal HDD, so it might be possible to speed that up a bit it didn't have to get information from the HDD.

samalex
April 30th, 2012, 02:41 PM
I just reinstalled with Xubuntu 12.04 and my System76 Panp5 laptop boots to a login in just about 10 seconds, maybe a hair under.

rg4w
April 30th, 2012, 02:59 PM
I was delightfully surprised to see how fast 12.04 boots. But in all fairness, it seems it boots to the desktop pretty quickly, but is still doing significant initialization after the desktop is rendered so the time to start using it is perhaps on par with earlier versions.

chugtairizwan
April 30th, 2012, 03:17 PM
yes it's almost ready with in 10 to 15 second..:popcorn:

Penguinnerd
April 30th, 2012, 03:22 PM
Inspiron 1420, 1 Gb ram, 80 Gb 5400 rpm hard drive, 1.67 Ghz core 2 duo.

10.04 gets up and running in about 40 seconds as I currently have it configured.

It's due to the ancient 5400 rpm hard drive though.

pqwoerituytrueiwoq
April 30th, 2012, 03:37 PM
i timed a xubuntu 12.04 install on a ssd and i got ~15 seconds sda=ssd (130MB/s);sdb=hdd (80gb 7200rpm)
sda /
sdb /var
sdb /home
sdb /root -> /home/root
sdb /mnt/Windows (dedicated partition to a virtual box vdi file)

that os boot speed is twice as fast as POST and that saiy more about POST than it does about os boot speeds (Yes it takes ~30 seconds to post, includes the ~20 to send output the the monitor before the MB's splash screen)
running a A6-3500 APU


on a 240 MB/s ssd set up similar i have pulled ~8 seconds on 10.04 (had to RMA that ssd 3 times and they sent the that slower one above)
AMD Phenom II x4 965

mips
April 30th, 2012, 03:44 PM
Xubuntu 12.04 with some services disabled takes 27sec.
CPU: Q6600, HDD: 7200rpm seagate.

On startup without any apps open it sucks up about 500MB of RAM, things feel a bit sluggish so Xubuntu is gonna get the boot and replaced with a minimal base install + xfce 4.10 soon (like I had in 11.10).

Mopar1973Man
April 30th, 2012, 03:51 PM
For what its worth... My system is booted well under one minute but now switch to Windows and it might take a up to 2-3 minutes to fire up...

So to give a estimate I would say about 20-30 seconds on Ubuntu 11.10.

CharlesA
April 30th, 2012, 04:15 PM
I haven't timed my server boot time since installing Precise, but on Lucid it took close to a minute to boot up fully.

Boot time really doesn't matter when something is only rebooted to boot into a new kernel. ;)

TheMTtakeover
April 30th, 2012, 04:39 PM
For what its worth... My system is booted well under one minute but now switch to Windows and it might take a up to 2-3 minutes to fire up...

So to give a estimate I would say about 20-30 seconds on Ubuntu 11.10.

Really? Windows 8 boots faster on my inspiron than any buntu I've ever had on it

|{urse
April 30th, 2012, 04:42 PM
I have a fresh install of 11.10 running on an ssd, it still takes a slight bit longer than 10 seconds.

TheMTtakeover
April 30th, 2012, 05:37 PM
I have a fresh install of 11.10 running on an ssd, it still takes a slight bit longer than 10 seconds.
Slightly off topic but does Ubuntu auto-detect an SSD? or do you have to enable TRIM manually?

CharlesA
April 30th, 2012, 05:55 PM
Slightly off topic but does Ubuntu auto-detect an SSD? or do you have to enable TRIM manually?
TRIM is enabled in the kernel from what I've heard.

goldshirt9
April 30th, 2012, 06:22 PM
I am running Kubuntu 12.04 on a
Fujitsu lifebook AH531

Intel Core i5 Sandybridge 2430M 2.4GHz,
2x4GB DDR3 1333MHz, Dual Channel Support
Seagate 320GB Momentus XT 2.5" Hybrid HDD/SSD - SATA-II 7200rpm 32MB Cache


from boot to password screen 11 sec's.
As far as i know i have disabled nothing in the system :lolflag:.

pqwoerituytrueiwoq
April 30th, 2012, 06:46 PM
TRIM is enabled in the kernel from what I've heard.
really? we don't need the discard option in fstab anymore with the current kernel (3.2.0-24)?

CharlesA
April 30th, 2012, 06:55 PM
really? we don't need the discard option in fstab anymore with the current kernel (3.2.0-24)?
That's what I heard, but the only source I can find is this:
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1926044

keithpeter
April 30th, 2012, 10:35 PM
Hello All

Recycled HP workstation, Quad core xeon, 4Gb ram, slow as molasses mechanical hard drive, doubles as a handy room heater.

From pressing the power switch to usable desktop (autologin enabled): 55 seconds
(From pressing the power switch to Grub: 25 seconds)

I only boot up once a day, and most days I use hibernate which knocks about 20 seconds off the second part of the boot.

Uncle Spellbinder
April 30th, 2012, 10:35 PM
Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

HP Pavilion - Intel Core i-5 - 3.1oGHz - 8GB Memory.

20 to 25 seconds to boot into login screen.

Dry Lips
May 1st, 2012, 11:39 AM
Say trim is automatically enabled... I guess it still is a good idea to set a low swappiness value?

mips
May 1st, 2012, 12:13 PM
Say trim is automatically enabled... I guess it still is a good idea to set a low swappiness value?

You should not be running swap on a ssd imho, move it to a normal drive.

Dry Lips
May 1st, 2012, 12:30 PM
You should not be running swap on a ssd imho, move it to a normal drive.

Ok, I'll do that on my main computer, but I was hoping that I didn't have to use a normal drive on my server. :/

Warpnow
May 1st, 2012, 01:19 PM
On my acer aspire one netbook I got Ubuntu so boot in 8 seconds, but it took disabling alot of services.

Maheriano
May 1st, 2012, 06:41 PM
I didn't test just the bootup which could very well be under 10 seconds but I did just do a test of pushing the power button to seeing the desktop and it was 25 seconds.That's on a blazingly fast Samsung Series 9 with a Core i7 and solid state drive.

mips
May 6th, 2012, 08:43 PM
Xubuntu 12.04 with some services disabled takes 27sec.
CPU: Q6600, HDD: 7200rpm seagate.

On startup without any apps open it sucks up about 500MB of RAM, things feel a bit sluggish so Xubuntu is gonna get the boot and replaced with a minimal base install + xfce 4.10 soon (like I had in 11.10).

Ok so today I installed xfce 4.10 on a base install and I'm now booting in 16.73 seconds. That's 10 seconds shaved off!

rk0r
May 6th, 2012, 08:56 PM
10 seconds is slightly pushing it, i have a bootloader to select different OS so that may add some time to the boot. either way its not something that's an issue, as long as the OS loads up in ample time.

Cavsfan
May 6th, 2012, 08:56 PM
It probably would but, I notice it takes more time recognizing my 1TB USB drive than anything else.
If I unplugged that it probably would, but I am not going to.
It definitely boots up faster than Windows 7.

catlover2
May 6th, 2012, 09:02 PM
It takes 13 seconds with one of these (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820226236) from the GRUB2 menu to KDE desktop. This is with ArchLinux on the machine in my signature. With my BIOS added, it takes 36 seconds. (!)

johnluke728
May 6th, 2012, 09:10 PM
Well, I'm using WUBI on this laptop, so I'm not sure if that has anything to do with my boot time, because it sits at a blank screen for a few seconds after the grub menu, before making it to the login screen. Otherwise the boot process would probably take less than ten seconds, but either way it still boots faster than Windows 7 does! :P

Rodney9
May 7th, 2012, 08:54 AM
My laptop from grub takes 45 seconds.

Dual-Core T4400@2.20Ghz with 2Gb ram

jespdj
May 7th, 2012, 02:38 PM
I have a laptop with an SSD.

Boot time: approximately 18 seconds.

I timed from GRUB (went into the GRUB menu and pressed Enter to start booting Ubuntu) until the moment the login screen was ready to accept my password.

This is with Ubuntu 12.04, 64-bit. I have some extra stuff installed, for example MySQL Server, which probably adds some time to the boot process.

EnGorDiaz
May 7th, 2012, 06:48 PM
Does anyone have an SSD? I'm sure that would get under 10 seconds or right around there.

im about to test on patriot wildfire 120gb

EnGorDiaz
May 7th, 2012, 06:55 PM
i get 10.93 seconds on my patriot wildfire from grub to untiy desktop

a2j
May 7th, 2012, 07:48 PM
~10 sec on main workstation and netbook, both with SSDs. Kubuntu and Xubuntu.

What is wrong with having swap on SSD? If you have good amount of RAM, it will rarely use it. But when you need it, it will swap faster than regular hard drive.

mips
May 7th, 2012, 08:06 PM
~10 sec on main workstation and netbook, both with SSDs. Kubuntu and Xubuntu.

What is wrong with having swap on SSD? If you have good amount of RAM, it will rarely use it. But when you need it, it will swap faster than regular hard drive.

Then you will be fine.

CharlesA
May 7th, 2012, 08:08 PM
Then you will be fine.
Yep. The only thing swap is really used for is hibernation, well, unless you run out of memory. ;)

codingman
May 7th, 2012, 10:02 PM
Lenovo 3000 N100 Core 2 Duo T700, 3 gb ram. Running at about 25 seconds from grub. However, my other computer, an ASUS A8n-SLI, 4gb ram, Athlon 64 FX-55, runs Fedora for 8 seconds of boot, and Ubuntu for 10 seconds.

ratcheer
May 7th, 2012, 10:34 PM
I cannot even boot Arch Linux in under 10 seconds. It takes 12. Ubuntu 12.04 is more like 22.

Tim

Rodney9
May 8th, 2012, 04:16 AM
My laptop from grub takes 45 seconds.

Dual-Core T4400@2.20Ghz with 2Gb ram

Above was with Ubuntu 12.04

On Xubuntu 12.04 - 25sec


Rodney

oldfred
May 8th, 2012, 04:56 AM
Ubuntu says it it less than 10 sec. Last commands posted in dmesg.


[ 8.489004] ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): eth0: link is not ready
[ 8.489384] ADDRCONF(NETDEV_UP): eth0: link is not ready
[ 8.521985] Bluetooth: RFCOMM TTY layer initialized
[ 8.521990] Bluetooth: RFCOMM socket layer initialized
[ 8.521992] Bluetooth: RFCOMM ver 1.11

And I thought I had Bluetooth turned off?

But I count from power switch and before I mounted extra partitions it was 20sec and then mounting a couple of NTFS & ext3 partition it balooned by 25% to 25sec.

ratcheer
May 8th, 2012, 01:20 PM
And I thought I had Bluetooth turned off?



To turn off bluetooth, edit /etc/init/bluetooth.conf and comment out the line near the top that says, "start on started dbus".

Tim

oldfred
May 8th, 2012, 02:19 PM
@ ratcheer
Thanks Tim, that removed the bluetooth entries.

Retor
August 12th, 2012, 08:05 PM
"10 seconds"? HOW!?!

I have a new install (today) and it takes 38 seconds from I hit enter at the grub menu until I see the complete desktop (auto login).

That's almost 4 times the ad, and I have a Intel Sandy Bridge i5 CPU (2410M), 2.30GHz 4. And 4 GB of ram.

Not an SSD, though. Maybe that's why.

Jakin
August 12th, 2012, 08:20 PM
My system is has a Seagate Momentus XT, my grub is set up to wait indefinitely for me to choose an OS, Kubuntu 11.10 amd64 boots in 4 seconds, starting from the moment i choose it in grub- to the login screen. I didn't do anything special to the system to make it boot faster either, if anything i bogged it down.

mips
August 12th, 2012, 10:02 PM
"10 seconds"? HOW!?!

I have a new install (today) and it takes 38 seconds from I hit enter at the grub menu until I see the complete desktop (auto login).

That's almost 4 times the ad, and I have a Intel Sandy Bridge i5 CPU (2410M), 2.30GHz 4. And 4 GB of ram.

Not an SSD, though. Maybe that's why.

That can't be right. What HDD do you have?

KiwiNZ
August 12th, 2012, 10:11 PM
I just don't get the hang up on boot times, are people re-booting their devices every 15 minutes, hourly, 10 times a day?

I Re-boot maybe twice a month, 10 seconds, 30 seconds 1.5 minutes it just does not matter. There in excess of a million seconds in a month does 20 seconds really count that much?

Jakin
August 12th, 2012, 11:00 PM
I just don't get the hang up on boot times, are people re-booting their devices every 15 minutes, hourly, 10 times a day?

I Re-boot maybe twice a month, 10 seconds, 30 seconds 1.5 minutes it just does not matter. There in excess of a million seconds in a month does 20 seconds really count that much?

The setup i was refuring to is a laptop, so yes; it is shutdown and booted frequently.

Its also about the hardware you paid for- if you know it should be booting around a specific time, and it doesn't then something is wrong.

KiwiNZ
August 12th, 2012, 11:18 PM
The setup i was refuring to is a laptop, so yes; it is shutdown and booted frequently.

Its also about the hardware you paid for- if you know it should be booting around a specific time, and it doesn't then something is wrong.

If you are rebooting a laptop so often that 10 seconds or 30 seconds is vital then put it to sleep as opposed to shutting down, your hardware will thank you for it.

CharlesA
August 12th, 2012, 11:22 PM
if you are rebooting a laptop so often that 10 seconds or 30 seconds is vital then put it to sleep as opposed to shutting down, your hardware will thank you for it.
+1.

Primefalcon
August 12th, 2012, 11:37 PM
The 10 secs would be on a decent machine with ssd and a bare base install (no extra programs starting)

Paqman
August 12th, 2012, 11:43 PM
I just don't get the hang up on boot times

Performance in general is a good thing. People only turn the machine on when they've got a task in mind. If they're sitting there waiting for the OS to get out of the way before they can do that it's natural for them to find it a bit annoying.

I personally think resume times are just as (if not more) important.

KiwiNZ
August 12th, 2012, 11:47 PM
Performance in general is a good thing. People only turn the machine on when they've got a task in mind. If they're sitting there waiting for the OS to get out of the way before they can do that it's natural for them to find it a bit annoying.

?

I turn my work machines on at the beginning of the day, my home machines stay on until I need to reboot. if I only turned my machines on when I had a task to do I would be turning on and off hundreds of times per day.

Jakin
August 12th, 2012, 11:53 PM
Is there really any proof that putting your computer to sleep, is better for it versus turning it off and on?

azangru
August 12th, 2012, 11:56 PM
I turn my work machines on at the beginning of the day

And isn't it just nice when it is all ready to work in 15-20 seconds after you've pushed the button, instead of in a couple of minutes?

My parents' computer is a Toshiba laptop with Windows 7 on it (yes, they haven't seen the light yet), and because of the antivirus software and whatnot it takes over two minutes, maybe more, before it is usable. It gets on the nerves, really.

KiwiNZ
August 13th, 2012, 12:12 AM
And isn't it just nice when it is all ready to work in 15-20 seconds after you've pushed the button, instead of in a couple of minutes?

My parents' computer is a Toshiba laptop with Windows 7 on it (yes, they haven't seen the light yet), and because of the antivirus software and whatnot it takes over two minutes, maybe more, before it is usable. It gets on the nerves, really.

Don't know, don't care I turn it on then go and have a meeting or such like .

KiwiNZ
August 13th, 2012, 12:20 AM
Is there really any proof that putting your computer to sleep, is better for it versus turning it off and on?

Powering off and on a lot can "stress" the components, eg the minute IC's on the chips and solder points due to expansion and contraction. Also electrical stress on components is a factor. You need to balance that however with the cost of running devices on standby.

As for Laptops if you are using them mainly on the desk top and you have one with a removable battery, remove the battery when fully charged and store it in a cool dry location and run purely off the mains. If you do not have a removable battery it is probably best to power off if the machine is to be unused for a period of time and disconnect the power source.

Jakin
August 13th, 2012, 12:28 AM
Powering off and on a lot can "stress" the components, eg the minute IC's on the chips and solder points due to expansion and contraction. Also electrical stress on components is a factor. You need to balance that however with the cost of running devices on standby.

As for Laptops if you are using them mainly on the desk top and you have one with a removable battery, remove the battery when fully charged and store it in a cool dry location and run purely off the mains. If you do not have a removable battery it is probably best to power off if the machine is to be unused for a period of time and disconnect the power source.

I was unaware of the battery thing, but wouldn't sleep mode do the exact same thing? In sleep low power, and wakeup at full power, cause stress as well?

I don't really know how the life-span of a computer works one way or the other, as you say, i'll try to get used to putting in sleep mode, rather than powering off.

Paqman
August 13th, 2012, 12:37 AM
?

I turn my work machines on at the beginning of the day, my home machines stay on until I need to reboot. if I only turned my machines on when I had a task to do I would be turning on and off hundreds of times per day.

Right. Do you suppose everybody does things exactly the same as you?

A lot home computers do stay off until they're needed.


I was unaware of the battery thing, but wouldn't sleep mode do the exact same thing? In sleep low power, and wakeup at full power, cause stress as well?

In sleep much of the machine is powered down, so much of it will cool. So resuming from suspend will cause a thermal cycle.

Solder has such a low melting point that even at the low temperatures in a computer it's actually operating in the same kind of thermal regime as the turbine blades in a jet engine. Strange but true.

KiwiNZ
August 13th, 2012, 12:46 AM
Right. Do you suppose everybody does things exactly the same as you?

A lot home computers do stay off until they're needed.


I answered a post directed at me, I was not answering on behalf of humanity.

vasa1
August 13th, 2012, 04:07 AM
I just don't get the hang up on boot times...
But that video was supplied by the installation, implying that someone among those who compiled the installation has the "hang up".

KiwiNZ
August 13th, 2012, 04:22 AM
But that video was supplied by the installation, implying that someone among those who compiled the installation has the "hang up".

?????????

vexorian
August 13th, 2012, 04:55 AM
My Desktop takes 13 seconds from the time I select ubuntu in GRUB. It is a core 2 duo overclocked to 3.1 Ghz. 32 bits ubuntu, 2 GB of RAM

My netbook needs 21 seconds. It is an Atom with 1.6 Ghz.

However, before grub is enabled, both computer waste precious seconds. I'd say 6 seconds. It used to be much worse in Ubuntu 10.10. I think grub 2 got faster.


I just let my computer sleep when I don't have to use it. I hope it does not use much more energy than when turned off. (I doubt it as there is always ghost drain and the such).

granjerox
August 19th, 2012, 02:13 PM
My Specs:


Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-2400 CPU @ 3.10GHz
4 GB Ram
SSD Agility 3 120GB ext4
Ubuntu 12.04 Desktop x64

Time between 7 - 9 Secs. Bootchart attached. Bootchart claims 28 secs because a 20sec sleep time by default to catch up login processes.

I've added preload and disabled cupsd, bluetooth and saned.

I've been looking around a good tutorial to understand boot process. Do you know any?

zer010
August 19th, 2012, 11:43 PM
nope, but with my specs....

Buntu Bunny
August 20th, 2012, 02:52 AM
Well you know, I never timed it. All I know is that it boots faster than any version of Windows I ever used!!! :lol:

irv
August 20th, 2012, 04:10 AM
Right after a fresh install of 12.04 and a list of about 25 apps. And a new 180gig SSD in my Dell Inspiron 1521 with 4gig of RAM and a AMD 64 processor. It was booting from power on to desktop in 15 seconds.

Now I just installed Black Opal which is still Ubuntu 12.04 but with some extra apps and some extra effects. Now it take 30 seconds total. From power on to logon is 20 seconds from logon to desktop 10 seconds.

Just for the record when I was running Win7 on a 500gig Hard Drive it took 2 minutes 20 seconds to a usable desktop. And that was when it wasn't doing update. That could take up to 6 minutes or longer in some cases.

viperdvman
August 20th, 2012, 06:43 AM
Well, testing both my computers... my Asus AMD V105 netbook that's just about a year and a half old, and custom my Core i3 desktop with a 4 1/2 to 5 year old SATA 3.0gb/s hard drive. Both run the same Ubuntu 12.04, but the desktop is more heavily loaded with KDE and GNOME Shell built on top of it in addition to Unity.

The desktop goes from Grub to login in 28 seconds. The netbook goes from Grub to login in battery power in 37 seconds. So no, they don't boot in 10 seconds. I'm sure my Bodhi Linux on the same desktop goes much faster. Installing a much newer hard drive, possibly even an SSD, will definitely speed up boot times on my desktop.

But any way I slice it, both also have Windows 7 installed in a dual-boot environment. And on both computers, Ubuntu boots up far faster than Windows. And Ubuntu is useful pretty much right when you get your desktop. Windows, on the other hand, has to start up all its startup apps, which easily takes up to another minute.

So it may not boot up in 10 seconds like advertised on those old videos, it still boots up a lot faster, and is useful a lot faster than Windows is :D

jfreak_
August 20th, 2012, 08:37 AM
LOL. What's 10 seconds? ROFL

PS: Look at my sig

irv
August 20th, 2012, 05:25 PM
I think to be fair and show the exact time of boot. we should all install Bootchart
222930
and post our boot time. Here is mine.
222931
EDIT: as you can see, my was just under 20 seconds. And I guessed mine at 30 seconds by counting.

irv
August 20th, 2012, 05:32 PM
All those that say they are booting in 10 seconds or less, I would like to see their bootcharts. I know it is possible in the right conditions. My wife has a Chromebook that boots in 7 seconds. It load very little at boot time and run everything off the Internet.

DoktorSeven
August 20th, 2012, 09:22 PM
I don't reboot unless absolutely necessary, making boot time kind of irrelevant. :)

synaptix
August 20th, 2012, 09:41 PM
Of all the Ubuntu versions I've used starting with 9.10, the only one that has ever come close to a 10 second boot time was 10.10 Meerkat that was clocking in at 17 seconds with 10.04 coming in closely behind at 17.5 seconds.

irv
August 20th, 2012, 09:49 PM
Of all the Ubuntu versions I've used starting with 9.10, the only one that has ever come close to a 10 second boot time was 10.10 Meerkat that was clocking in at 17 seconds with 10.04 coming in closely behind at 17.5 seconds.
What are you running now? And how fast do it boot?

KiwiNZ
August 20th, 2012, 09:58 PM
Never time it, 10 seconds , 15 seconds, 45 seconds is irrelevant in my life.

quids
August 20th, 2012, 10:07 PM
9 seconds on my HTPC
AMD A8-3870k (3.0GHz Quad core) with OCZ Agility 3 60GB SSD. Its running Ubuntu 12.04 booting directly into XBMC.
Might be a bit quicker if I ever get around to removing all the surplus stuff Ubuntu comes with.

Shutdown time though is crazy - under 2 secs. I couldn't switch it off faster unless I flicked the switch off at the mains. :p


My desktop computer boots up in about 11 secs.
AMD 1100T (3.3GHz Hex core) with OCZ Vertex 4 256GB SSD, a Vertex 2 60GB SSD (for /tmp and Swap) and a couple of 2TB Harddrives.

irv
August 20th, 2012, 10:16 PM
9 seconds on my HTPC
AMD A8-3870k (3.0GHz Quad core) with OCZ Agility 3 60GB SSD. Its running Ubuntu 12.04 booting directly into XBMC.
Might be a bit quicker if I ever get around to removing all the surplus stuff Ubuntu comes with.

Shutdown time though is crazy - under 2 secs. I couldn't switch it off faster unless I flicked the switch off at the mains. :p


My desktop computer boots up in about 11 secs.
AMD 1100T (3.3GHz Hex core) with OCZ Vertex 4 256GB SSD, a Vertex 2 60GB SSD (for /tmp and Swap) and a couple of 2TB Harddrives.
Do you have Bootchart installed? See my post #76 in this thread. It is a very small program that will time your boot up.

synaptix
August 20th, 2012, 10:23 PM
What are you running now? And how fast do it boot?

I don't run Ubuntu on my desktop anymore, only Windows 7.

Though if you'd like some numbers I could clean install 12.04 installation when .1 is released and post some numbers. :)

My laptop does run 12.04 solely right now, but it's not as powerful as my desktop.

irv
August 20th, 2012, 10:39 PM
I don't run Ubuntu on my desktop anymore, only Windows 7.

Though if you'd like some numbers I could clean install 12.04 installation when .1 is released and post some numbers. :)

My laptop does run 12.04 solely right now, but it's not as powerful as my desktop.
As far as you laptop goes it still would be nice to know how long it takes to boot up. I have an old laptop but I boosted up the RAM from 2 to 4gig and install a SSD and it gave it new life to an old machine. I wish I could do this to myself.

synaptix
August 21st, 2012, 12:45 AM
Desktop system:
AMD Athlon II 635 X4 2.9GHz
Seagate 700GB SATA HDD 7,500RPM
AMD/ATI Radeon HD4200 256MB
Catalyst 12.6
Chipset driver 12.6

OS: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS x86_64
21.22 seconds to active desktop (best out of 3):

http://img860.imageshack.us/img860/6223/ubuntubootspeed.png

OS: Windows 7 Home Premium x64 (as comparison of boot times)
16 seconds to active desktop:

http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/5251/windows7bootspeed.png

Moose
August 21st, 2012, 12:58 AM
I can't remember all the specs but my laptop is a HP G62 Notebook PC, 2GB of RAM, Dual Core i3 processor.

Boots up in between 8-15 seconds on average. With about 17 being my slowest. But that was when i was using Ubuntu 10.04 and hadn't done much to clean up and keep it running smooth. All in all i think Ubuntu has kept pretty close to the speed it promises.

-Anarchy

irv
August 21st, 2012, 03:55 AM
I can't remember all the specs but my laptop is a HP G62 Notebook PC, 2GB of RAM, Dual Core i3 processor.

Boots up in between 8-15 seconds on average. With about 17 being my slowest. But that was when i was using Ubuntu 10.04 and hadn't done much to clean up and keep it running smooth. All in all i think Ubuntu has kept pretty close to the speed it promises.

-Anarchy

If you run Bootchart you can see the boot time.

Moose
August 21st, 2012, 03:59 AM
If you run Bootchart you can see the boot time.
Good to know.

irv
August 21st, 2012, 04:15 AM
Good to know.

I forgot to say you need to install it first. It puts a boot chart in /var/log/bootchart directory so you can view it. you need to make it bigger so you can read it.
just run:

sudo apt-get install bootchart
sudo apt-get install pybootchartgui

Lucradia
August 21st, 2012, 03:02 PM
Definitely not, even if it's the only OS on my system and even if it has no password to login, and no encryption and no sep. home. I think the bottleneck mainly is the GPU I have, which is two generations old in comparison to the motherboard. (So is the DVD Drive I have.)

@synaptix you don't need BootRacer to get windows boot results. There is a bootchart-like program provided by Microsoft themselves. (http://techie-buzz.com/tips-and-tricks/windows-boot-performance-wpt.html)

Retor
August 21st, 2012, 07:32 PM
That can't be right. What HDD do you have?

Computer says: Hitachi Travelstar 5K750


Serial ATA-300, 8 MB buffer, 5400 rpm, 12 sec avg. seek time.

http://reviews.cnet.com/internal-hard-drives/hitachi-travelstar-5k750-hts547564a9e384/4505-9998_7-34411666.html

Mr. Picklesworth
August 22nd, 2012, 12:53 AM
Dell XPS 13: End of POST to functioning login screen in ~9 seconds :)

Desktop gets to a login screen in about 10.

They both boot from SSDs, of course. I think the desktop used to do 20 or so booting from the HDD.

mips
October 21st, 2012, 12:47 PM
Ok it's not Ubuntu but a Manjaro net install running XFCE 4.10. I always thought it booted fast but never imagined it was this fast, 9893ms (<10s)

Core2Quad 6600 @ 2.4GHz, 4GB RAM, Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 ST3250310AS 250GB 7200 RPM 8MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5"

I have systemd-readahead-collect.service systemd-readahead-replay.service enabled for systemd

Click on link for bigger image
http://ompldr.org/tZnlvaw (http://ompldr.org/vZnlvaw)

mips
October 21st, 2012, 12:51 PM
Computer says: Hitachi Travelstar 5K750


Serial ATA-300, 8 MB buffer, 5400 rpm, 12 sec avg. seek time.

http://reviews.cnet.com/internal-hard-drives/hitachi-travelstar-5k750-hts547564a9e384/4505-9998_7-34411666.html

38s seems slow but then it's a 5400rpm drive. Maybe post the output of bootchart for your system. If you are using ext4 also have a look at e4rat but I have no idea how that compares to upstart.

Linuxratty
October 21st, 2012, 06:29 PM
A little longer than 10 seconds...Not timed with with a stop watch.:)
Actually,I really don't care how fast it boots..As long as it's under a minute,I'm happy.

~LoKe
October 21st, 2012, 07:44 PM
8:30 from boot to Desktop.

~LoKe
October 21st, 2012, 08:15 PM
Disabled Bluetooth, tried again.

7:41, on 12.10.

http://i.imgur.com/Rarxm.png

mmstick
October 22nd, 2012, 02:19 AM
10 seconds with Ubuntu 12.10? My 2TB 5400RPM drive boots to the desktop in much less than that. Of course, I have a Phenom II X6 3.2Ghz processor in this machine to ease the loading process.

~LoKe
October 22nd, 2012, 03:55 AM
10 seconds with Ubuntu 12.10? My 2TB 5400RPM drive boots to the desktop in much less than that. Of course, I have a Phenom II X6 3.2Ghz processor in this machine to ease the loading process.

I'd like to see the bootchart on that. I don't see a 5400RPM drive allowing those kinds of speeds.

cprofitt
October 22nd, 2012, 04:02 AM
My machine takes roughly 18.7 seconds to get to the login screen.

Specs:

Core i7-3720QM
16 GB ram
320 GB 7200 RPM Hitachi

I am pretty sure with an SSD I would get under 10 seconds, but not with spinning disks.

Starcruiser322
October 22nd, 2012, 04:55 AM
Dual-Core 2.4 GHz, 6 GB RAM, SATA running RAID config @ 7200 rpm each disk
Without any performance tweaking, ~15 seconds. If I feel like doing tweaking I get it to >10 easy. MUCH FASTER THAN WINDOWS, with tweaks (~45 SECONDS)

mips
October 22nd, 2012, 04:01 PM
8:30 from boot to Desktop.

What drive are you using?

irv
October 22nd, 2012, 07:14 PM
I just install 12.10 this morning and my bootup time stayed the same. About 20 seconds. It would be a lot slower if I didn't have a SSD installed.

Henkdroid
October 22nd, 2012, 10:46 PM
My boot time is an amazing 1:14. I recorded how long it took to reboot my computer and it was 3:09~. It's a 5ish year old ThinkPad T61 with a 5400 RPM hard drive.

~LoKe
October 23rd, 2012, 02:14 AM
What drive are you using?

A crappy 60GB OCZ Vertex Plus.

lz1dsb
October 23rd, 2012, 10:45 AM
I am running Kubuntu 12.04 on a
Fujitsu lifebook AH531

Intel Core i5 Sandybridge 2430M 2.4GHz,
2x4GB DDR3 1333MHz, Dual Channel Support
Seagate 320GB Momentus XT 2.5" Hybrid HDD/SSD - SATA-II 7200rpm 32MB Cache


from boot to password screen 11 sec's.
As far as i know i have disabled nothing in the system :lolflag:.
Wow... that's impressive :lolflag:
On my system it takes maybe more than 40 seconds to get to the password screen.
But I've made some tweaks which might have led to inefficiencies...

Grenage
October 23rd, 2012, 10:53 AM
Corsair Force 3
2500k @ 4.6

Windows (untweaked): 6.5 seconds.
Ubuntu (untweaked): 9 seconds.

I ended up removing Ubuntu and just leaving Windows on there.

madoshwa
October 28th, 2012, 02:53 AM
mines closer to 18 seconds, but that could also be the hdd im using. its a 120g seagate laptop hdd. not the greatest, but it runs. unfortunately it does sacrifice loading speed

SuperFreak
October 28th, 2012, 06:07 PM
From hitting the power button to having a usable desktop(firefox and Thunderbird open) my computer takes 35 sec. However my boot chart (attached) appears to indicate that boot takes 56 seconds. Please correct me if I am wrong but it appears that the extra time is taken by processes in Sleep mode. Is it necessary or desirable to change this?

monkeybrain2012
October 28th, 2012, 06:18 PM
It is probably less than 10 sec (for 12.04 and 12.10, it used to take longer, like 25s) Lubuntu is even faster even on some old crapboxes.

Paddy Landau
October 28th, 2012, 09:50 PM
My boot time is an amazing 1:14. I recorded how long it took to reboot my computer and it was 3:09~. It's a 5ish year old ThinkPad T61 with a 5400 RPM hard drive.
Seriously just 74 seconds? On a 5-year-old computer with a hard drive not an SSD? What Linux distro and version are you using?