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jiangshi
April 19th, 2012, 09:35 PM
I have downloaded the 64 bit version of the iso for xubuntu twice, and burned the image from two different machines. However, I cannot get the computer to boot to the new CD. Yet the same computer boots fine to the 64 bit version of ubuntu 10.04 and installs without issues. The motherboard is an ECS K800 M2 Rev 2.0 running an AMD Sempron 2600+ 64 bit processor, and 1gb ram.

While I okay with regular ubuntu, I really would like to use xubuntu on the computer. Besides, I find this to be a rather weird situation. Any ideas?

~jiangshi

jiangshi
April 19th, 2012, 10:26 PM
I just found another computer (32 bits) and the disk boots the computer. Will a 64 bit iso boot on a 32 bit machine? I'm thinking it shouldn't. I checked and made sure that I downloaded the correct version, and it is as nearly as I can tell by the file name: xubuntu-10.04.2-desktop-amd64.iso.

Still looking for ideas...

plucky
April 20th, 2012, 09:12 AM
I just found another computer (32 bits) and the disk boots the computer. Will a 64 bit iso boot on a 32 bit machine? I'm thinking it shouldn't. I checked and made sure that I downloaded the correct version, and it is as nearly as I can tell by the file name: xubuntu-10.04.2-desktop-amd64.iso.

Still looking for ideas...

A 64-bit ISO will not boot on a 32-bit system.

If you try it will give you an error message.


Good Luck

mrgs
April 20th, 2012, 09:25 AM
Why did you pick 10.04 and not 11.10?

jiangshi
April 24th, 2012, 03:02 PM
A 64-bit ISO will not boot on a 32-bit system.

If you try it will give you an error message.


Good Luck

I went to the Xubuntu site and downloaded the 10.04 64 bit iso, and still the same results. I downloaded the alternate 64 bit iso, and it installs. I am wondering if maybe the regular 64 bit iso is actually linked to the 32 bit iso? I say that because as stated the 64 bit cd will boot up on my 32 bit machine, and as you say, it shouldn't do that. Perhaps someone behind the scenes at Xubuntu should check on that.

jiangshi
April 24th, 2012, 03:37 PM
Why did you pick 10.04 and not 11.10?

No, I did not pick the first Ubuntu I tried. I have used them all at some point in time. I used to prefer the KDE GUI, but I like the Gnome better now. In my earlier days of Linux, not long after Novell bought SuSE, I moved over to Ubuntu, and I use it on my regular desktop machine. Xubuntu I've used on older machines, even an old IBM 380 ED P1 laptop.

One of the features that I like about Xubuntu is file browser. When right-clicking the menu has a choice for opening a terminal window at that location. This is a feature that should be stock in Ubuntu's file browser. However, by googling the issue I found the following:

sudo apt-get install nautilus-open-terminal

And that adds the same capability. I just think it should be standard instead of having to add that functionality manually.

You ask a very interesting question about why I did not choose 11.10. My answer is that usually I do upgrade to the newer versions as they come out. I started with 7.04. However, I am finding that all the bells and whistles, glitz and glitter that are being added to the GUI is not adding any real value - it is neat technology in terms of programming to say the least, but performance begins to suffer on anything other than the newer machines. I also believe that function begins to suffer as well because form apparently has become more important.

Certainly in some ways Linux is competing with Windows, but I think Microsoft made a huge mistake in adding all the mostly visual "improvements" in Vista and 7. I hear that many times from Windows users. Menus and menu items appear to be moved around just for the heck of it. I don't need or want semi transparent backgrounds to my text editor. The text entries and somewhat visible background images make the text almost unreadable. My point is that making Linux look and behave like Windows may also be a mistake. The younger generation likes the glitz and glitter, but they will discover sooner or later that it is more of a hindrance than a help.

This has gotten too long, so I hope I have answered your questions. Thank you for your reply. ~jiangshi

jiangshi
April 24th, 2012, 09:11 PM
A 64-bit ISO will not boot on a 32-bit system.

If you try it will give you an error message.


Good Luck

I still have the same problem, but I have verified that the 64 bit iso that I downloaded is definitely for a 64 bit machine. As you have pointed out, an error will come up on the screen. I was not letting the process go far enough. The starting screen will come up on a 32 bit machine, but if you do the "try it" or the install, the error comes up.

So I guess there must be something different about the computer and/or DVD drive so that it does not recognise the boot sector on the CD. I've downloaded and burned the iso for Xubuntu 11.10, and I will try that tonight.

~jiangshi

jiangshi
April 25th, 2012, 04:24 PM
I've downloaded and burned the iso for Xubuntu 11.10, and I will try that tonight.

~jiangshi

The 64 bit iso for 11.10 boots up just fine. I do not know what could be the issue with the 10.04 iso. The machine has a sata dvd burner/player, perhaps there is something in the older iso that the drive does not recognise. I would not pursue any farther, but 10.04 is an LTS release. Does anyone have any suggestions as to how to isolate the problem to either the machine or the iso?

Thanks in advance.

~jiangshi

mrgs
April 25th, 2012, 04:29 PM
Try to change everything you did:

USB Boot in stead of DVD/CD
Lubuntu in stead of Xubuntu
Alternate ISO in stead of standard
32 bit in stead of 64.

Does that work better?

jiangshi
April 25th, 2012, 05:06 PM
Try to change everything you did:

USB Boot in stead of DVD/CD
Lubuntu in stead of Xubuntu
Alternate ISO in stead of standard
32 bit in stead of 64.

Does that work better?

Very good advice, and I shall take it!

Thank you!
~jiangshi