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View Full Version : Monetise a pdf / ebook?



johnuk
March 26th, 2012, 04:57 AM
I often run example experiments and publish the results on home science websites.

I am happy to (and do) post the majority of this work for free.

However, some of these examples (not just my own) require a considerable investment in time, effort, money and physical risk on the behalf of the poster.

Journal entries currently run 20 - 30 (each), and are not particularly applicable to a home environment. Indeed, some of the work on home science websites meets or exceeds the detail the journals themselves go into. The research done in the journal entries is often paid for by the tax payer and student fees.

I am wondering if there is someway for these more costly examples and guides to be monetised, perhaps for just 50p a download, to help offset the cost of producing them in the first place.

Ideally, this would involve them being downloaded as PDF's (or some other document format) that either carries a unique digital signature or requires a key (attached to the users account) to open. Preferably, it'd be impossible to copy / paste the content or print it (so it can't be sent to a 'digital desktop printer').

I'm aware that banners are one method of monetising, but that is less preferable than an upfront viewing charge.

I expect there is already some way to do this, with regards to eBooks, but (having never been involved in it before) I also expect I am lagging far behind on the options here.

Many thanks!
John

sanderj
March 26th, 2012, 07:32 AM
Sell as an eBook via amazon / kindle: https://kdp.amazon.com/self-publishing/signin

Someone can then read via his/her webbrowser pointing to https://read.amazon.com/

Henry Flower
March 26th, 2012, 11:22 AM
Don't take this the wrong way, but charging people for a crippled pdf is the kind of thing that gets right up people's noses. If you really think there's a market for your material, sanderj's suggestion seems a better way to go.

knight2000
March 26th, 2012, 11:37 AM
You could realease it on Google Play and charge 50p. If not as an ebook then as an app. That way you could target any android tablet or phone user. PS. ignore the Negative Nigels. Sometimes I think people (even staff) just trawl these forums until they can shoot someones idea or hobby down. I've seen it in other threads today. It's not very nice and certainly not in the spirit of 'Ubuntu'. You will never know if something will succeed unless you try it. Good luck.

SemiExpert
March 26th, 2012, 06:39 PM
What about Smashwords?

BeRoot ReBoot
March 26th, 2012, 07:32 PM
Release it freely and let people donate if they like. That way, people who choose not to pay for it won't have to commit a crime and feel guilty for no reason.

jonathonblake
March 27th, 2012, 08:46 PM
I am wondering if there is someway for these more costly examples and guides to be monetised, perhaps for just 50p a download, to help offset the cost of producing them in the first place.

SmashWords. Whilst the output might not be to your taste, it will get your content into the major eBook vendors, with the appropriate file format.

jonathon

johnuk
March 28th, 2012, 08:28 AM
Thanks for the replies everyone. I'll have a look into these.

People usually have to pay for education. At present, it is working entirely in reverse, I am paying for other people to learn and can't pay for my own (I still owe the student loans company 10k).

I entirely agree with the idea of keeping it free or not for profit, but I do literally need some form of money to buy the things for the demonstration, as I can't keep up with the cost of it alone.

As an example, the last piece of work I did required a mere 15 separate distillations, totalling around 50h, and 36 separations, just for one section of the demonstration of one experiment and disregarding the cost of materials.

Paqman
March 28th, 2012, 08:43 AM
Release it freely and let people donate if they like.

This. You might be surprised how many people do actually donate if you're providing good content. Just make sure your donate buttons are prominent and don't "suggest" and amount, just let them pay whatever they want.

You could try going half way with the "pay whatever you feel it's worth" model, including allowing people to pay zero if they want.

Grenage
March 28th, 2012, 08:51 AM
You can't buy food with love, unfortunately; I don't think anyone will begrudge you earning some money. I don't know exactly what your reports are like, so take this with a pinch of salt.

If the reports are 40+ pages of text, I'd rather view it on an e-book; if they were shorter or full of colourful diagrams, I'd settle for a PDF. Either way, I'd be able to print off a copy if I really needed to.

As Paqman says, it can be surprising what people donate. The Humble Indie Bundle is a prime example, where the average intake is arguably higher than its expected retail value. You could trial it for one issue.

johnuk
March 28th, 2012, 08:54 AM
You could try going half way with the "pay whatever you feel it's worth" model, including allowing people to pay zero if they want.

That's not a bad idea.

winh8r
March 28th, 2012, 09:06 AM
Thanks for the replies everyone. I'll have a look into these.

People usually have to pay for education. At present, it is working entirely in reverse, I am paying for other people to learn and can't pay for my own (I still owe the student loans company 10k).

I entirely agree with the idea of keeping it free or not for profit, but I do literally need some form of money to buy the things for the demonstration, as I can't keep up with the cost of it alone.

As an example, the last piece of work I did required a mere 15 separate distillations, totalling around 50h, and 36 separations, just for one section of the demonstration of one experiment and disregarding the cost of materials.

You might be able to work this around to your advantage, maybe by starting a "journal" of your own and accept submissions from other home scientists, obviously for less than the normal submission fees of the existing science journals. That way , you are providing a niche platform for others in your field, and also generating some income from it.

The journal could be made available by subscription or as already suggested by a front page detailing the project and providing a means to donate to the project if desired.

As you have already explained , the home science projects/experiments often go into far more detail than the normal journals, therefore you would be developing a resource which would undoubtedly be very popular amongst those who wished their entire findings to be published rather than being edited in order to fit in with an existing format.

Another alternative is a "members" website where you would host submissions online (for a fee) and allow access to the findings , or part thereof, if you were still wishing to sell the whole reports.