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daslinkard
March 18th, 2012, 12:20 AM
I have been thinking about this question for a few weeks now. I have religiously been using Ubuntu for the past 2 months. I am thinking that I would like to make Linux a career but I'm curious as to which path I should go down.

I have read a little on the CLI and then I started with the Linux for Dummies, but then I also have the Linux Bible. There is a ton of information out there readily available but I'm looking for someone to point me in the right direction as to what reading material I should target, etc.

I want to be a super user not just a casual Linux user. I'm looking for serious answers and appreciate your answers. Thank you very much.

chipbuster
March 18th, 2012, 02:05 AM
I'm no linux guru, but personally, I've found that reading material isn't enough. Go out and look for things to do with what you know. Try something you've read, screw it up, and break your system. Read about the breakage, try to fix it, break it even more. Keep that up until you just give up and reinstall, then repeat the entire cycle. I've reinstalled multiple systems multiple times now, and I haven't even hit 6 months, though I am a lot savvier than I was before. (or I like to think I am...maybe I've just gotten lucky ;))

Anyways, read, learn, try, break, rinse, repeat. That's what's worked for me so far. And maybe try to help others--you'd be amazed how many questions can be answered by reading documentation and then intepreting it for someone else.

Frogs Hair
March 18th, 2012, 02:55 AM
Here are descriptions of two out of the many courses for the I.T. program where I attend collage.

Linux, Introduction to
Covers introductory Linux topics including operating system basics, system installation, file system management, file system administration and basic commands. Considerable hands-on learning is included.

Linux Administration
Covers advanced Linux topics including scripting in the BASH shell, system initialization, working with X Windows, managing Linux processes, system administration tasks, system backup, software installation, troubleshooting, system performance, network configuration and security. Considerable hands-on learning is included.

daslinkard
March 18th, 2012, 03:17 AM
Folks,

I appreciate the advice and I definitely agree with breaking the system so to speak. The one thing that I wish I had more time was time to read the forum. I have a Linux Toys book and I have thought about doing one of the projects. At the same time though I want to be able to become well versed. Currently I am someone that if someone has a Windows issue or their PC (Windows platform) is not working it is a breeze for me to get them back up and running.

Right now with Linux it is an entirely different story. I guess that I fail to remember the days when I was a newbie starting out on Windows. I think back to the days of making mistakes (as you have written about with Linux) in Windows and having to start something all over again. I appreciate the responses greatly as I wish I could close my eyes, re-open them, and have the same amount of knowledge about Linux as I do with Windows.

daslinkard
March 18th, 2012, 03:18 AM
@ Frogs Hair....the Linux Administration definitely sounds right up my ally. Thank you for sharing...these are some good suggestions. I look forward to others weighing in their beans worth.

flick
March 18th, 2012, 03:54 AM
A great place to learn about and play with command line stuff :

http://linuxcommand.org/

A great online magazine to whet your appetite for programming and fun projects like setting up a home server, that sort of thing :

http://fullcirclemagazine.org/

d4m1r
March 18th, 2012, 04:00 AM
Linux Administration
Covers advanced Linux topics including scripting in the BASH shell, system initialization, working with X Windows, managing Linux processes, system administration tasks, system backup, software installation, troubleshooting, system performance, network configuration and security. Considerable hands-on learning is included.

There is a serious shortage of linux admin's currently and most high-tech companies are always looking for qualified linux stuff. This said, it's not something you can just read about online and then get a job on. The best way to learn is by doing in my opinion, so setup some networks at home and manage them (along with the documentation) is my suggestion.

It's funny because I work with linux everyday at my job and while the developers (our software is written in Java but runs in linux) are technically a position higher than me but are always amazed by my knowledge of linux ;)

daslinkard
March 18th, 2012, 05:07 AM
@d4mr1,

That is exactly what I am talking about. This is the hunger that I have burning deep within every ounce of me. I want to be the go to guy when it comes to Linux and it's almost to a fault being that I tend to get system overload with the amount of information. Even though it is out of characteristic for me I am trying to teach myself to pull back on the reins and take it one step at a time.

You spoke about the network in which I have my home network all running off Linux and actually found it easier to set up my network printer using Linux than in Windows. What, in your opinion, is some of the concentration focal points I should start gearing up as I start making my baby steps? I've got to learn to crawl before I walk and with my personality I know it will not be long (less than a year) that I should be up and running with different knowledge. The amount of knowledge I already have makes me chuckle when I reflect back to my earlier days (2 months ago) when I started out on Ubuntu.

The Cog
March 18th, 2012, 01:44 PM
These forums can be very informative, too. Visit often, and try to answer some other people's problems. Some questions will be far outside of what you know about, and some will be things that you already know. The ones that you learn from will be the ones that you think you know but just need to double-check before answering, and the ones that you don't know the answer to but that catch your interest enough for you to come back later and see the answers others gave.

d4m1r
March 18th, 2012, 04:13 PM
@d4mr1,

That is exactly what I am talking about. This is the hunger that I have burning deep within every ounce of me. I want to be the go to guy when it comes to Linux and it's almost to a fault being that I tend to get system overload with the amount of information. Even though it is out of characteristic for me I am trying to teach myself to pull back on the reins and take it one step at a time.

You spoke about the network in which I have my home network all running off Linux and actually found it easier to set up my network printer using Linux than in Windows. What, in your opinion, is some of the concentration focal points I should start gearing up as I start making my baby steps? I've got to learn to crawl before I walk and with my personality I know it will not be long (less than a year) that I should be up and running with different knowledge. The amount of knowledge I already have makes me chuckle when I reflect back to my earlier days (2 months ago) when I started out on Ubuntu.

1) If you have an old desktop lying around, install Ubuntu server on it and use it for sharing files across your network, centralized backup location, etc

2) If you don't have a space PC at home to use, get a cheap annual linux VPS. This is how I learned how everything actually works in linux (behind the scenes look). A VPS is basically a virtual server, so you are given a dedicated IP and then you can basically SSH into the server, which is root access but you only get a command line interface because VPS' usually only come with 128MB-512MB RAM which is not enough to run a UI. I paid $20/year for mine, PM me if you want more info.