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View Full Version : Distro-hopper User's Help (DUH)!



Dragonbite
March 12th, 2012, 07:05 PM
I like "DUH" instead of "DHA" (Distro-Hopper's Anonymous) :lolflag:

Are you somebody who tries to stick with one Linux distribution or another for any length of time? Even if you go between 2 or 3 or 200 or 300! You read something, or find a use for something that leads you to.. or from a distribution only to find yourself returning or reconsidering or switching again shortly after?

Do you see the next version coming, but not fast enough?

Do you like to read new features, and jump ship so you can try them out yourself even if it means installing an unstable version?

While I have tried a few distributions in my time, I find myself hoping between one of three and just as I get settled in one distribution, for some reason I get the "itch" and start looking at going to another distribution!

How do you survive it? What have you used? What is the longest you've stayed in one place? Do you want to stick with one distribution?

Tell your story, there's no judgement (by me) here!

haqking
March 12th, 2012, 07:08 PM
virtualisation

the end ;-)

winh8r
March 12th, 2012, 07:11 PM
I was like you but now I am like Haqking above.

Virtual machines scratch the itch nicely.

Dragonbite
March 12th, 2012, 07:11 PM
virtualisation

the end ;-)

On which distribution :lolflag:??

matt_symes
March 12th, 2012, 07:13 PM
Ubuntu is like my comfy slippers.
Linux mint is like my flash trainers.
Debian is like my steel toe-capped work boots.
Fedora is like my smart work shoes.
Arch is like my running shoes.
Gentoo is like my rock climbing shoes.

I have much footwear.

BeRoot ReBoot
March 12th, 2012, 07:20 PM
virtualisation

the end ;-)

I don't know, running an OS in an OS doesn't feel right, and it makes the minimalist inside me cringe.

Myself, I have a dedicated retired laptop for distro/OS hopping and testing. That way, I can still install a few operating systems a week without suffering much in terms of productivity.

Dragonbite
March 12th, 2012, 07:22 PM
virtualisation

the end ;-)

One of my problems is all, but one, machine has been a hand-off from somewhere (usually a company). The P4 may have enough power to handle VMs, but not much (2.5GB Ram, 2.4 GHz). The next most powerful system is a 1.8 Pentium M w/2GB of Ram. They don't provide much for VMing at any reasonable speed I suspect.

The only one that is capable is my wife's where I know once I start to "touch it" in this way, it will be harder to keep my hands off and thus enter instability!

linuxyogi
March 13th, 2012, 12:58 AM
I have tried Fedora, Ubuntu, openSUSE, Crunchbang, Archbang, Linux Mint Debian Edition, PCLINUXOS, PC-BSD, Slitaz

I stayed longest in Ubuntu & openSUSE.

Atm I am using LMDE on one of my PCs. Although a rolling release, LMDE is not bleeding edge. So may be I will move again.

Old_Grey_Wolf
March 13th, 2012, 01:11 AM
On which distribution :lolflag:??

I'm not sure what that comment meant. :)


I don't know, running an OS in an OS doesn't feel right, and it makes the minimalist inside me cringe.

Virtualization does not have to be "on a host OS", that is a type 2 hypervisor; such as, KVM and Virtualbox.

Type 1 hypervisors run on the bare metal; such as, Citrix XenServer, VMware ESX/ESXi, and Microsoft Hyper-V hypervisor.

If you want to run a Type 1 hypervisor, the processor(s) in the computer need to support the Virtualization Extensions.

I am at home using my personal computers, and at the moment with five computers in front of me only one supports the VT-extensions.

Graphic is from wikipedia Type 1 & 2 Hypervisors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hyperviseur.png).

viperdvman
March 13th, 2012, 01:59 AM
I have an empty partition set aside for test-running whatever distro I want, alongside my Ubuntu, Bodhi Linux, and Windows.

I sometimes use VirtualBox as well, though I'm still learning how to tweak it to run a proper 3D environment and such.

So yes, I do distro hop, but Ubuntu is my Linux home, and Bodhi Linux is my Linux home away from home :o

Dragonbite
March 13th, 2012, 02:48 PM
I think one of my (many) problems is I keep reading articles and reviews. I see something interesting about one of the other distributions, and it starts me thinking I want to try it, or find out how well it is working!

It used to be I only had one computer and it was dual-boot with Windows and Gentoo. Unfortunately I broke things too much and often had to tell my wife "I did something to the computer. I'll fix it when I come home from work.".

Once I got a computer I could use/break/fix without bothering her routine I've managed to keep my hands off of the "family" machine for the most part, and keep my distro-hopping to my secondary machine.

The downside is I don't get much of a chance to really get INTO a distribution! Once I hop to another I have to then pull in my files and such (Dropbox to the rescue), and fool around with the different programs.

On the other hand, it gives me a chance to try things out so I have a better idea for my options which I can use for deciding whether to upgrade the family computer to 12.04 LTS (it's running 10.04 LTS), or to something completely different.

Dragonbite
March 23rd, 2012, 01:43 PM
Now that the Ubuntu-new-release-hype is building, I am considering hopping over to Ubuntu for a while.

At least until the Fedora and openSUSE new-release-hype engines start up.

Comparatively, Ubuntu has the better hype machine on new features, innovation, etc. that makes me want to try it and see how well any part of this works. In part, to see if Unity comes together enough for me to stay (longer with Ubuntu..)

*twitch*

sffvba[e0rt
March 23rd, 2012, 01:45 PM
Now that the Ubuntu-new-release-hype is building, I am considering hopping over to Ubuntu for a while.

At least until the Fedora and openSUSE new-release-hype engines start up.

Comparatively, Ubuntu has the better hype machine on new features, innovation, etc. that makes me want to try it and see how well any part of this works. In part, to see if Unity comes together enough for me to stay (longer with Ubuntu..)

*twitch*

Welcome to the dark side (again) :p


404

forrestcupp
March 23rd, 2012, 02:51 PM
A long time ago, I tried out a lot of distros. Then I found Breezy Badger, and I've pretty much stuck with Ubuntu since then (Other than when I've used Windows). There were a couple of very brief times early on when I tried Sabayon Linux, and later Linux Mint. But I've been so satisfied with Ubuntu that I never really saw the need to ditch it.

Ubuntu would have to remove every DE but Unity from their repos before I would think it's necessary to move on. I might check out some other ones in a vbox sometime, though.

forrestcupp
March 23rd, 2012, 02:53 PM
Type 1 hypervisors run on the bare metal; such as, Citrix XenServer, VMware ESX/ESXi, and Microsoft Hyper-V hypervisor.

So are you saying there is a version of VMware that will run with no OS installed? How does that work?

Dragonbite
March 23rd, 2012, 03:19 PM
So are you saying there is a version of VMware that will run with no OS installed? How does that work?

VMware ESXi running on "bare metal" means it is a minimal OS whose sole purpose is to run VMs.

Because it is minimal, it utilizes practically no resources.

forrestcupp
March 23rd, 2012, 04:19 PM
VMware ESXi running on "bare metal" means it is a minimal OS whose sole purpose is to run VMs.

Because it is minimal, it utilizes practically no resources.

That's pretty awesome. And it's free to use. When they are able to pass through real hardware, it will be even more awesome.

warm cardigan
March 24th, 2012, 04:26 AM
The first Linux distribution I ever used was Ubuntu 10.10, back in December 2010. It was very close to perfect, but when Unity became mandatory in 11.10 I began searching for an alternative similar to 10.10. I'm now happily using elementary OS Jupiter, but in the past have looked at Fedora, Arch, Gentoo, Lubuntu and Pear OS, and am currently researching Fuduntu. I have tried Debian 6, Linux Mint and Scientific Linux. Neither SL nor Debian would install correctly, and Linux Mint's interface is not my favorite; therefore I am sticking with elementary OS for now, barring a possible move to Fuduntu, which isn't looking like a particularly likely situation at the moment.

keithpeter
March 24th, 2012, 03:18 PM
Ubuntu is like my comfy slippers.
Linux mint is like my flash trainers.
Debian is like my steel toe-capped work boots.
Fedora is like my smart work shoes.
Arch is like my running shoes.
Gentoo is like my rock climbing shoes.

I have much footwear.


Hello All

PUIAS Linux is my suit, blue shirt and ID badge
Ubuntu Unity is my red silk jacket and green trousers for the weekend

My wardrobe is very retro :twisted:

Dragonbite
April 23rd, 2012, 02:31 PM
I don't know if this is going to help me stay with Ubuntu or not, but it sure helps.

It's an article on How-To-Geek about Synchronizing what applications you installed on Ubuntu so when you upgrade (*cough*Thursday*cough*) you can automatically trigger to install the applications you had installed previously! Or if you want to make multiple machines identical.

I know there were some means to do it with dpkg before, but this makes it so much easier. Not to mention I can still claim that "I can do everything in Ubuntu without HAVING to go to the command line." (but I can if I do so by choice ;) )

http://www.howtogeek.com/111989/how-to-sync-quickly-reinstall-applications-on-ubuntu/ (http://www.howtogeek.com/111989/how-to-sync-quickly-reinstall-applications-on-ubuntu/)


The Ubuntu Software Center has an application sync feature. To access it, click the File menu in the Ubuntu Software Center and select Sync Between Computers.

The registration window asks you to create an “Ubuntu Software Center account,” but this is misleading. The Ubuntu Software Center works with Ubuntu single sign-on accounts – if you already have an Ubuntu One or Launchpad account, you already have a single sign-on account.

Once you’ve signed in, you can click over to the Installed tab and view the software you have installed on each of your connected computers. Select a computer and Ubuntu will compare its installed packages with the packages installed on your current system. This feature makes it easy to install packages after installing Ubuntu from scratch, even if you don’t remember the packages you had installed.

This feature is a bit limited at the moment – it only works with packages from Ubuntu’s default repositories, so packages from personal package archives (PPAs) or packages you’ve installed from outside a software repository won’t appear in the list. It also can’t automatically install applications on your other computer – you’ll have to open the list and install applications manually.Plus it includes a terminal-method and 3rd party script.

This could make upgrading each 6 months (or so) a lot easier:

/home in a separte partition (so files and configs are stored)
synchronize with Dropbox or Ubuntu One for easy retrieval (just in case...)
Synchronize applications installed
Use Chromium with sync set up so everything is just there (bookamrks, passwords, extensions, etc.)
Gmail connects via IMAP so everything is sync/subscribed easily

:popcorn: