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View Full Version : At what point do you think of yourself as a Linux "Guru" or "Professional"?



nikonian
February 22nd, 2012, 03:30 AM
At what point did you, do you, or would you consider yourself a Linux "Guru" or "Professional"? I have been using Linux since around 2003-2004 (not sure exactly), and I know quite a fair amount, but I would never refer to myself as a "Guru" or "Professional", as I find branding oneself in such a way, to be not only rather boastful, but there's always someone who knows more. I am not saying I am not valuable... but I am not saying my skills are invaluable either.

I have a couple of friends who call me a "genius", which is ever so kind of them, but I am really not. God gave me the gifts that I use to polish my skills, and I thank him for that, so I cannot take *all* the credit, eh!

Any comments? :)

Thanks.

Linuxratty
February 22nd, 2012, 04:09 AM
Never.Yeah,I've used it eight years,but a guru I'm not.

Copper Bezel
February 22nd, 2012, 04:11 AM
You need at least some formal training or some serious development contribution history to count as a guru, I think. "Professional" would be simpler to define - do you get paid to do it?

Gremlinzzz
February 22nd, 2012, 04:17 AM
The first time i got it installed wasn't easy with breezy:popcorn:

ikt
February 22nd, 2012, 04:20 AM
When I stop requiring tutorials to do everything.

NadirPoint
February 22nd, 2012, 04:23 AM
If that's what you think, then you're not it.

lisati
February 22nd, 2012, 04:27 AM
I think of myself more as a hobbyist than a guru or a professional: as others have noted, there are often others who know more than I do visiting the forum.

nikonian
February 22nd, 2012, 04:42 AM
You need at least some formal training or some serious development contribution history to count as a guru, I think. "Professional" would be simpler to define - do you get paid to do it?

Formal training, that only focuses on specific areas? I'd not call that a passport to declare yourself "professional", I'd call it a reason to tell people "Hey, I went on a training course". That's great, but the amount of people who've told me "Oh, I went on a course years ago, but I can't remember much about it". To be a good geek, you need a fire and a PASSION for it!

In Britain today, a basic IT certification is basically gained through a course which teaches you touch-typing and how to send emails, create slides in PowerPoint and write macros in Excel. LOL. It's usually the people who get a sheet of paper with an embossed gold stamp on it, who self-brand themselves as "Certified piffle administrator". That course taught them a very narrow skill set.

Taking a course on how to maintain Apache servers, teaches you just that; how to maintain Apache servers. You cannot hand down years of hair tearing, mistake making, shouting at your PC, personal nuances and mental associations and muscle memory, in a two week course with a diploma to stick on your wall, to boast how clever they say you are.

I am not knocking taking courses, but a good example is when people say "Well, I am X, Y & Z certified", but you ask them something simple regarding terminal usage, and they shrug at you.

Life experience, hands-on in your own time is when you learn most, because there is plenty of time to make mistakes, and you don't get in trouble for breaking your OWN pc. You can't "teach" years of hard earned experience to someone, in two weeks.

Copper Bezel
February 22nd, 2012, 05:22 AM
Well, sure. I was thinking actual training, like, some uni courses, and combined with the assumption that the person's probably a geek. That was for "guru," though - it's very possible to be a guru without that being your career, and as you say, not every "professional" is a guru, either.

kevdog
February 22nd, 2012, 05:46 AM
Hate to break it to you guys, but I'm a guru professional certified by hopeandaprayer univeristy. The truth hurts sometimes.

CharlesA
February 22nd, 2012, 05:50 AM
I think of myself more as a hobbyist than a guru or a professional: as others have noted, there are often others who know more than I do visiting the forum.

This is how I feel as well. I can usually get problems fixed by myself or with a quick google, but there are things that really throw me off.

cbanakis
February 22nd, 2012, 06:44 AM
I would consider myself an expert if 90% of my posts here, were answering peoples questions.

But the sad truth, is that 40% of my posts are asking for help, then 50% are in random discussions like this one, leaving only 10% of the time, where I am actually contributing.

I would like to turn those numbers around, and I typically look for posts I know the answers to, but since I have very few answers, I usually end up getting caught up in discussions like this one.

JDShu
February 22nd, 2012, 07:25 AM
Dunning and Kruger published something interesting in 1999.

I'm a Linux Guru :D

MisterGaribaldi
February 22nd, 2012, 08:02 AM
When you can fully use the myriad small command line utilities, whether individually or stitching them together through pipes, and do significant amounts of SA and NA work, then you're a guru. If you get paid (ostensibly) as a guru, then you're a professional.

I'm none of the above.

spynappels
February 22nd, 2012, 10:33 AM
I guess I'm a UNIX professional as I work solely with Solaris and Linux servers, but I'd never call myself a guru. Most people who call themselves gurus of something are anything but in my experience.

I have a certain proficiency, but even the most seasoned UNIX sys-admin still needs Google and how-tos for tasks which are not part of their normal activities.

I do admit to being a geek though...

Grenage
February 22nd, 2012, 10:43 AM
I'd never call myself a guru. Most people who call themselves gurus of something are anything but in my experience.

I'd agree; I've never met someone who regarded themselves as a guru, but I'd tell them to get their head of of their behind if I did.

I've used Linux for a while, and am not too bad; that said, it's a wide topic to cover. While I can operate and dabble with reasonable competence, I'm awful at scripting (or any coding).

forrestcupp
February 22nd, 2012, 02:00 PM
If your name is Linus Torvalds, then you're a Linux guru and professional.

cprofitt
February 22nd, 2012, 04:21 PM
Well... Being a guru does not take an advanced degree and a special piece of paper... but I would not call myself a professional until I had a job using it. Wait... I do. No, not even then. Technology moves to fast to ever reach 'expert' or 'guru' stage... And I loathe the usage of the term 'expert' or 'guru' when self-applied.

neu5eeCh
February 22nd, 2012, 05:36 PM
Maybe when you can build Linux from Scratch (http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/) without the instruction manual sometime between breakfast and lunch... you know... just for fun?

spynappels
February 22nd, 2012, 05:46 PM
Remember that Professional != Expert

Professional == Getting paid for doing it.

dagroves
February 22nd, 2012, 09:34 PM
Neither, when I can stop searching Google for constant help on using Linux then I can be a professional or Guru. Until then I am a Home user.

lisati
February 22nd, 2012, 09:38 PM
Here's a thought: it's possible to show professionalism in what you do by doing what you do well, even if you're not an expert.

MBybee
February 22nd, 2012, 10:00 PM
I've been 'professional' ever since I had to support an SAP implementation on RH 6.5, and professional on Unix for many years prior.

Guru? Not so much. My opinion of my own skills tends to vary depending on who I work with and encounter :)

winh8r
February 22nd, 2012, 10:09 PM
I think that if you really know the system inside out, and are able to do things like list pathnames fully off the top of your head and can "solve" any issue with a linux system without actually being in front of one then you may be approaching guru status.

It is safe to say that there are Linux professionals who are not gurus and Linux gurus who are not professionals.

If there are people out there who fit into both camps then they truly deserve some real respect!!

One thing about Linux is , there are often quite a few ways to achieve the same end result , with none of the possible methods being either right or wrong, just different.

It is a tough question to answer, but a good one though!

alexfish
February 22nd, 2012, 10:28 PM
A hobbist is always inventive
A guru takes to the next level
A profesional will polish it

Think I must Be a Butler , cleaning up the mess and polishing the bits left over

Lee_Bo
February 22nd, 2012, 10:42 PM
Well since I'm not officially supporting Linux in my office, I'm not a professional. And even though I've been using Linux off and on for over 10 years, I'm definitely not a guru.

Linuxratty
February 23rd, 2012, 01:38 AM
The first time i got it installed wasn't easy with breezy:popcorn:

It was for me.(Yeah,Linspire got that right!)

odiseo77
February 23rd, 2012, 02:41 AM
Although I can make my way around when it comes to linux and computers, I consider myself rather an enthusiast amateur :D

IWantFroyo
February 23rd, 2012, 02:43 AM
I don't. The more I learn, the more I find out there is to learn.

BlinkinCat
February 23rd, 2012, 02:45 AM
I don't either - I'm afraid I'll never get there - :)

Gremlinzzz
February 23rd, 2012, 03:39 PM
If you can install it for a friend your a Guru,if your friend pays you your Professional,
and a lousy friend:popcorn:

MBybee
February 23rd, 2012, 04:08 PM
If you can install it for a friend your a Guru,if your friend pays you your Professional,
and a lousy friend:popcorn:

Does beer count?

Gremlinzzz
February 23rd, 2012, 07:58 PM
Does beer count?

yeah your a "Professional":popcorn:

MBybee
February 23rd, 2012, 08:34 PM
yeah your a "Professional":popcorn:

:roll:
So you don't even accept a beer from your friends? Dang, that's harsh.

Gremlinzzz
February 23rd, 2012, 08:40 PM
:roll:
So you don't even accept a beer from your friends? Dang, that's harsh.

Welcome to the major leagues :popcorn:

Old_Grey_Wolf
February 24th, 2012, 08:18 PM
I tend to agree with the posts quoted below.

I have an engineering degree and certifications; however, those are outdated in 5 years or less after you get them. What makes me a "Professional" is the fact I am paid to work in the field, and when a project is started the project manager asks for me by name when trying to get qualified people to fill an engineering position.

I had a self-proclaimed "Guru" working for me. It didn't take long for me or his coworkers to realize he didn't know what he was talking about half the time. He was just boastful and sounded like he knew something. :rolleyes:

I have a computer lab in my home so that I can keep up-to-date with the changes in technology. A "Professional" must work had at self-education in order to not become an "expert" (ex-spurt) or has-been. :)


I guess I'm a UNIX professional as I work solely with Solaris and Linux servers, but I'd never call myself a guru. Most people who call themselves gurus of something are anything but in my experience.

I have a certain proficiency, but even the most seasoned UNIX sys-admin still needs Google and how-tos for tasks which are not part of their normal activities.

I do admit to being a geek though...


Well... Being a guru does not take an advanced degree and a special piece of paper... but I would not call myself a professional until I had a job using it. Wait... I do. No, not even then. Technology moves to fast to ever reach 'expert' or 'guru' stage... And I loathe the usage of the term 'expert' or 'guru' when self-applied.

CharlesA
February 24th, 2012, 08:26 PM
That's been my experience as well.

I might know a bit, but I'm no expert. ;)

Gremlinzzz
February 24th, 2012, 08:34 PM
What are the ten characteristics of a Linux Guru?

1. Knowledgeable in all major Linux distributions.
2. Configures Samba, DNS, Sendmail and Apache with no Googling.
3. Helps others solve their problems with Linux.
4. Blogs or writes about personal experiences with Linux.
5. Donates time and resources to at least one Linux project.
6. Uses Linux on a variety of computing hardware.
7. Hacks Linux-based devices for fun and/or profit.
8. Finds innovative ways to use Linux at work.
9. Is a Linux Evangelist.
10. Has a collection of very early (Kernel 1.x or older) Linux CDs

:popcorn:

ubume2
February 24th, 2012, 08:47 PM
A guru? :lolflag:
Always a newb here. But occasionally I find myself helping a newer newb in the forums.

Always learning! :D

Gremlinzzz
February 24th, 2012, 08:49 PM
Most of us are Linux Hobbit's :popcorn:

Old_Grey_Wolf
February 24th, 2012, 08:52 PM
What are the ten characteristics of a Linux Guru?

1. Knowledgeable in all major Linux distributions.
2. Configures Samba, DNS, Sendmail and Apache with no Googling.
3. Helps others solve their problems with Linux.
4. Blogs or writes about personal experiences with Linux.
5. Donates time and resources to at least one Linux project.
6. Uses Linux on a variety of computing hardware.
7. Hacks Linux-based devices for fun and/or profit.
8. Finds innovative ways to use Linux at work.
9. Is a Linux Evangelist.
10. Has a collection of very early (Kernel 1.x or older) Linux CDs

:popcorn:

I know some systems administrators at work that meet all of those with the exception of 4, 9, and 10. They prefer Mac or Microsoft Windows on their own computers. :)

Eiji Takanaka
February 25th, 2012, 02:41 AM
Never or when you have completely created a computer yourself from raw materials, assembled the circuitry and then compiled your own custom (possibly linux based) operating system.

Whichever comes first!

These are the rules.

You must also of used linux/unix for a minimum of 30 years.

And of turned 100 younglings from the darkside that is windows/corporate based operating systems.

These prerequisites are mandatory.

If you achieve these three things, then and only then should the title professional or linux guru be attained.

Tis the 3 degrees of computer wizardry.

Old_Grey_Wolf
February 25th, 2012, 02:58 AM
Tis the 3 degrees of computer wizardry.

So mote it be!
Know thyself!

:)

Eiji Takanaka
February 25th, 2012, 03:01 AM
Hoho

Master thyself!

;)

Old_Grey_Wolf
February 25th, 2012, 03:09 AM
Hoho

Master thyself!

;)

You need knowledge of thyself to be able to master thyself, and wisdom trumps them both. :D

Eiji Takanaka
February 25th, 2012, 03:19 AM
Maybe friend...maybe. =)

Haha apologies for the homer simpson'esque comment tis getting late. ;)

Old_Grey_Wolf
February 25th, 2012, 03:22 AM
Maybe friend...maybe. =)

Haha apologies for the homer simpson'esque comment tis getting late. ;)

Friend...I think. :)

Eiji Takanaka
February 25th, 2012, 03:49 AM
Unless one looks deeply into a lake all one will see is ones own reflection. And only when the lake is perfectly still will one be able to see clearly what lies beneath. Watch out though for the enemy! he is constantly trying to throw stones into our lakes, so that we cannot see the tasty fish swimming about beneath the surface!
Constantly creating an illusion of ego on the surface. To redirect our attention from the real goal of catching fish!

Perhaps if we control our stone throwing ego's that want us to concentrate on the illusionary mirror on the surface of the lake, and instead focus hard on the truth, we will catch some fish and be well fed!
Lets hope so!

So say old China man anyways =P.

enjoijesus94
February 25th, 2012, 03:53 AM
dont know man good question:guitar:

Old_Grey_Wolf
February 25th, 2012, 04:49 AM
Unless one looks deeply into a lake all one will see is ones own reflection.........

I like the imagery. I know what it means. I will use it my dreams tonight, minus the stones.
:)

darrenn
February 25th, 2012, 03:23 PM
I had to install a wifi card the other day and had trouble figuring it out. Had to make it from the source code. But I will get lots of practice installing it because it seems every time a new kernel comes out I have to reinstall.

So the answer to your question is no.

nikonian
March 1st, 2012, 05:13 AM
...And of turned 100 younglings from the darkside that is windows/corporate based operating systems.


If you started reeling off that fanboyish spiel about Windows users or "the dark side" and all that nonsensical, childish piffle, your "guru" status would be in serious jeapordy. That's not sense or wisdom, that's pride taking precidence over logic, and anyone hearing that would just think you're an accusational know-it-all.

Bucky Ball
March 1st, 2012, 05:16 AM
Whether you consider yourself a guru, professional or otherwise, if you're not still learning something or think you have nothing else to learn then you're probably kidding yourself, IMHO. (This may also apply if you consider yourself a guru or pro!) ;)

Most of us experienced users are great at one or some things and not expert on others which is why we use this community; so others can fill the gaps.

nikonian
March 1st, 2012, 05:29 AM
Whether you consider yourself a guru, professional or otherwise, if you're not still learning something or think you have nothing else to learn then you're probably kidding yourself, IMHO. (This may also apply if you consider yourself a guru or pro!) ;)

Most of us experienced users are great at one or some things and not expert on others which is why we use this community; so others can fill the gaps.

SO true!

daslinkard
March 3rd, 2012, 06:39 AM
I find myself gravitating towards Terminal related questions...why? Because I like the terminal....from using it, manipulating it, etc... now it has been mentioned in previous posts about we should never stop learning and I couldn't agree more.

When we stop learning is going to be the day that we run into issues. I am without a doubt a Googler and it's kind of funny because a lot of people come to me for answers and I have yet to tell them my secret....it made me think of the following site, "Let Me Google That For You" (http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Linux)

Bucky Ball
March 3rd, 2012, 12:02 PM
"Let Me Google That For You" (http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Linux)

Ha, I love it! ;)

Lightbeam7
March 4th, 2012, 12:57 AM
I'll probably be basic-intermediate for some time. But, I'm okay with that.

Eiji Takanaka
March 4th, 2012, 04:10 AM
If you started reeling off that fanboyish spiel about Windows users or "the dark side" and all that nonsensical, childish piffle, your "guru" status would be in serious jeapordy. That's not sense or wisdom, that's pride taking precidence over logic, and anyone hearing that would just think you're an accusational know-it-all.you ever heard of the saying use a sprat to catch a mackerel? ;)

Master your ego brother/sister or it will master you.

Bloody trekkies. ;) haha.

Nah just messing, theres some good trekkies out there i spose. Each to their own and all that. ;)

wolfen69
March 4th, 2012, 04:41 AM
I can usually get problems fixed by myself or with a quick google, but there are things that really throw me off.

Same here. I consider myself able to solve just about any problem I may encounter, but a guru I'm not. Some advanced things are way over my head. I'm just a linux/ubuntu enthusiast that helps with testing and tries to help people whenever I can.

CharlesA
March 4th, 2012, 06:32 AM
Same here. I consider myself able to solve just about any problem I may encounter, but a guru I'm not. Some advanced things are way over my head. I'm just a linux/ubuntu enthusiast that helps with testing and tries to help people whenever I can.
Aye. I remember racking my brain trying to get something to compile with DKMS, and I found out almost two years later what to do to get it to work from a wiki entry on Ubuntu 11.04. Go figure.