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View Full Version : [ubuntu] 11.10: I can only store files in one of the partitions



Aguilarn
January 17th, 2012, 09:25 AM
Guys, when I installed Ubuntu I divided my Hard Disk in two partitions: one of which the file system is "ext4" (where I intended to store "Program files") and one (of which the file system is "extended") where I hoped to store all sorts of personal files (texts, media, etc.). Just like usually Windows users do: the first one would be equivalent to what in the majority of PCs is named "C:", and the other would be equivalent to what in the majority of PCs is named "D:".

The second partition is devided in two: one is named linux-swap, and I was created during the installation on demand of the installer itself. The other one ,of which the file system is ext2, is where I hoped to keep my stuff, in other words, the "Home" folder.

However, everything is being stored in the first partition (ext4). It is practicaly full and I bearly can store anything in my netbook (Acer Aspire One KAV60), in spite of the fact that there's lots of space available in my Hard Drive.

Is it possible for me to transfer my personal content to the second partition and make the system use only it, or will I have to reinstall Ubuntu?


(Thanks in advance and sorry on my poor English)

carl4926
January 17th, 2012, 09:29 AM
By default Ubuntu gives you one install partition +swap

But typically Linux users and most distro use swap + 2 partitions
/ (root)
/home

You have to use the advanced partitioner to point Ubuntu to the partitions you want it to use.

coffeecat
January 17th, 2012, 12:01 PM
Is it possible for me to transfer my personal content to the second partition and make the system use only it

Yes, you can, but first a few comments.

You cannot store stuff in an extended partition, because an extended partition is used solely as a container for logical partitions, in your case your swap partition and the ext2 partition. You will able to use the ext2 partition for storing data files, but ext2 is an old non-journalled filesystem, less robust than the newer ext3 and ext4 filesystems, and it may be advisable to reformat this before using it. Your use of terms such as "Program files" and "D:" suggests you are thinking in Windows ways. Windows and Linux have very different filesystem hierarchies and use partitions differently. By trying to set up Linux in a Windows way, Linux is fighting back and winning! :wink:

Let's have a look at your partition layout, and then we can take it from there. Open a terminal and post the output of these commands:


sudo fdisk -lu
df -h
sudo blkid

You'll be prompted for your password when you run the first command. Don't worry that nothing appears to be happening when you type the password in. Just type it and press enter and the command will work. Please post the output of those commands between
and tags in order to retain formatting. The simplest way of doing this is to highlight the output and then click on the http://ubuntuforums.org/images/editor/code.gif button in the message toolbar.