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View Full Version : Ultrabooks, the Ultra-Fancy New Name for Laptops



horadee
January 16th, 2012, 05:45 PM
It's about time!

I need one.

Mark Phelps
January 16th, 2012, 09:26 PM
Before you get too excited about Ultrabooks ... you might want to read through the following:

http://gizmodo.com/5875845/theres-no-such-thing-as-an-ultrabook

CharlesA
January 16th, 2012, 09:36 PM
Before you get too excited about Ultrabooks ... you might want to read through the following:

http://gizmodo.com/5875845/theres-no-such-thing-as-an-ultrabook
This pretty much.

I consider my 14" HP laptop an "ultrabook" since I can take it where ever I go.

Copper Bezel
January 16th, 2012, 09:50 PM
Intel says they're supposed to be affordable (around $1,000), thin (no more than 0.8 inches), light (no more than 3.1 pounds) and tenacious in the battery. They're to have speedy SSD storage. That is Plato's Ultrabook.
Aw, my Eee is 2.5 cm, instead of two flat. Fail. = )

CharlesA
January 16th, 2012, 10:39 PM
Aw, my Eee is 2.5 cm, instead of two flat. Fail. = )
Haha. My laptop has a "thinness" of .96" (around 2.4cm) but weighs a little bit over 4 pounds.

Copper Bezel
January 17th, 2012, 01:12 AM
Heh. = )

But yeah, giving it some thought, I actually disagree a very little with the article. I'll never use the term "ultrabook" without my tongue securely in my cheek and scare quotes securely hitched at both ends, but I think it's useful to note that it's a portmanteau of "ultraportable notebook", not just "ultra notebook," and I think it reflects Intel's intentions more than is obvious. The latter-generation Macbook Air was released after the iPad and sold on some of the same merits, including a quick boot and long standby life that drew comparisons directly to the iPad. It's a "whole computer" that fits into roughly the same sleeve. A consumer can reasonably be in a position to decide between the two for taking class notes, working mobile, or messing around on the tube. Intel wins when its chips are being used to make things that look like Macbook Airs and loses when ARM chips are used to make things that look like iPads (even when they run Android or Windows 8.)

I don't actually think that this is only a natural stage of netbook evolution. I don't think it's inconceivable that there could still be a lot of big, thick, plastic machines on the market in two or three years still seen as comparable substitutes for equally-still-exisitng desktop PCs. "Ultrabooks" are being positioned as machines meant to compete with tablets. As they get thinner and touchier and tablets start coming with (roughly) the same Windows OS, I think the competition between ARM and Intel on those grounds is going to be a meaningful one.

neu5eeCh
January 17th, 2012, 02:51 AM
I wonder if Ultra-Man would use an Ultra-Book? (Obscure reference to a late 70's poorly-dubbed Japanese cult science-fiction super hero who battled mega-monsters). I was just the right age...

magmon
January 17th, 2012, 03:49 AM
Progress is always littered with misguided failure. Look at some of the old 3d games for a great example... I feel these may well give me visualboy flash backs.

Ctrl-Alt-F1
January 17th, 2012, 08:08 AM
Ultrabooks, more like insultrabooks. An insult to the consumer's intelligence.

nathan.the.sane
January 17th, 2012, 08:50 AM
I'm happy with my megabook and its 17.3 inch screen :P

Personally, I am against this drive to miniaturize our computing equipment. In the event that I travel somewhere where it's not feasible to tote my laptop, I'll just take a book or mp3 player or something. If I'm going to be computing, I'm going to do it on something with some muscle. :)