PDA

View Full Version : What does this DUTCH sentence mean in English?



hanzj
December 3rd, 2011, 11:14 PM
Someone wrote this Dutch sentence. What does it say in English?
(I tried Google Translate, but it doesn't help)



Ik ben an't werk and van avond hebbe wij en brijloft voor de heele cantor.

BC59
December 3rd, 2011, 11:25 PM
I am an' t work and of evening hebbe we and brijloft for the complete cantor.

hanzj
December 3rd, 2011, 11:28 PM
bc59, i don't understand your sentence. Are you a native Dutch speaker?

bluexrider
December 3rd, 2011, 11:29 PM
Someone wrote this Dutch sentence. What does it say in English?
(I tried Google Translate, but it doesn't help)

google translate

I an't work tonight and we have loft and mash the whole cantor.

Old_Grey_Wolf
December 3rd, 2011, 11:34 PM
I am an' t work and of evening hebbe we and brijloft for the complete cantor.

That is the "Babel Fish" translation.

There are a few words that Google and Babel Fish can't translate. It could be caused by a colloquial use of the language.

I think it is saying that they are at work and will post the results when they get home in the evening.

marypi
December 4th, 2011, 12:05 AM
I am an' t work and of evening hebbe we and brijloft for the complete cantor.

lol is this from google translate?

BC59
December 4th, 2011, 12:29 AM
No, I just used the Altavista Babel Fish Traducer. The words not translated should be names or something.

Ebuntor
December 4th, 2011, 12:39 AM
Someone wrote this Dutch sentence. What does it say in English?
(I tried Google Translate, but it doesn't help)

I'm a native speaker: I'm working and tonight we have a wedding for the entire cantor.

Although this sure isn't a properly written dutch sentence, lot's of spelling errors.

cariboo
December 4th, 2011, 04:34 AM
Doesn't cantor mean office?

hanzj
December 4th, 2011, 08:25 AM
The author of the Dutch sentence has told me the English:

"I am working today and have the office party tonight."

lisati
December 4th, 2011, 08:31 AM
Doesn't cantor mean office?

If so, and if Google translate is reliable, it's a typo for kantoor.

(My Dutch cousins might frown on my ignorance.)

mips
December 4th, 2011, 10:16 AM
Fluent in Afrikaans and can read/understand Dutch (they're related) and to me the sentence translates to

"I'm at work and tonight we are having a wedding for the entire office"

The wedding part does not make sense assuming brijloft is actually misspelled bruiloft(dutch)=bruilof(afrikaans)=wedding(english ).

Bruiloft means 'wedding feast' so maybe they are just having a feast at work unless someone from work actually got married and having a chow/party for everyone at work.

mips
December 4th, 2011, 10:21 AM
The author of the Dutch sentence has told me the English:

"I am working today and have the office party tonight."

Do me a favour and ask him why he refers to the office party as a 'brijloft/bruiloft', I would really like to know as it generally refers to a wedding(feast).

Ebuntor
December 4th, 2011, 11:32 AM
Doesn't cantor mean office?

Nope, that's "kantoor", cantor is someone who sings in churches and it's the same word in Dutch.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantor_%28church%29

Thehumorouscheese
December 4th, 2011, 03:20 PM
you could mark this as solved lol

XD

why are you asking this anyways?