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dRounse
November 26th, 2011, 11:54 PM
I'm sorry I wasn't really sure where to post this.... but I want a tablet for Christmas and I was wondering if any of you had advice on which ones are best. I would prefer it to be under $300. And if it runs Android should i leave that on or switch to a different Linux distro. I'm sorry if this is the wrong post, but thanks for any advice you may have.

LinuxFan999
November 27th, 2011, 12:44 AM
Verizon was (and might still be) selling the Motorola Xoom for only $199.99 in their holiday sale. There is also the 7 inch samsung galaxy tab (not sure if verizon is discounting the 10 inch galaxy tab), but I don't recommend the 7 inch galaxy tab because it is slow and gets quite hot to the touch. There is also the Kindle Fire, which is also $199.99, but amazon has it in their "walled garden". Other than those 3, there are no good tablets below $300

LowSky
November 27th, 2011, 01:19 AM
Make sure it has Android 3.0 or better. Don't attempt to install another version of Linux, just stick to Android or if you really want to root it and install a custom ROM go with Cyanogenmod 9 when it is released.

dRounse
November 27th, 2011, 03:18 AM
What about the Toshiba Thrive? It's got Android 3.1 Honeycomb, with a 10.1" display, and has 8Gb storage, and its $280. The only reason it needs to be under $300 is because its going to be given to me and they usually spend $300 so I dont want to ask for more. Also I'm not too sure (it may have a reason) but why does Best Buy say the tablets have for example 8Gb memory? That may seem a little misleading to someone who thinks they are talking about RAM, because the first time I saw it I thought it was talking about RAM. And thank you LinuxFan999 and LowSky

LowSky
November 27th, 2011, 05:52 AM
Tablets don't use hard drives. 8GB is referring to the internal flash memory. You will have 8GB of storage for applications and any media you load to the device.

dRounse
November 27th, 2011, 06:31 AM
Thank you. I figured that, I just didnt like how it was worded, because it made me think of RAM but that seemed too ridiculous for a little tablet to have more RAM than a pc. And is flash memory last longer than a hard drive... because I talked to a guy at the Computer Domain (local computer store) and he said that if flash memory fails it can cost a lot to get the information back.

Copper Bezel
November 27th, 2011, 12:49 PM
When you moved to Linux, you might have had a few occasions where someone told you that you're thinking in Windows terms that don't apply. Same here. It's not a PC.

Good flash memory will last for the life of the device, yes; it technically has less longevity than a magnetic drive under "normal use," but hard drives don't die of old age to begin with, failing instead due to the accumulated mechanical damage of small shocks, which flash memory is much less prone to without any moving parts. If you break it, the data is gone, sure.

RAM is rarely listed in the adverts, but it's generally 500 megs or a gig. You don't need more than that for Android. With a little poking around, you can find the RAM for any particular tablet, but the bigger differences tend to be in processor speed.

forrestcupp
November 27th, 2011, 01:47 PM
What about the Toshiba Thrive?

Thrive is a pretty good tablet. It has a USB host port, HDMI, and SD slot, all full size. The only problem with that tablet is that it's very thick.

It's too bad you couldn't have gotten in on Best Buy's Black Friday sale. They had ASUS Transformers for $249. That is one sweet tablet, especially at that price. I have one and love it. I think $399 is the regular price, though.

You need to go to somewhere like Best Buy and look at what they have. If you don't mind getting a 7 inch, you'll have a lot more to pick from at that price.

stinkeye
November 27th, 2011, 04:40 PM
In all honesty, tablets are an over-hyped luxury toy.
I bought an acer A500 and it was fun to play with for about 2 weeks.
Unless you have a specific use in mind it just ends up lying on the
coffee table to be played with occasionally while watching TV.

Copper Bezel
November 27th, 2011, 07:05 PM
My only machine right now is an Asus netbook. There's very little I do with it on a daily basis that Asus's own Transformer can't manage. And while I haven't yet died for lack of 3G access, it's been close on occasion. = P

$300 and no data plan is a toy, sure. I wouldn't say the same of slates in general.

dRounse
November 28th, 2011, 01:34 AM
Thanks I can go up to $400 so I was looking at the Acer but I'm not to sure of it, I have an Acer laptop and i wasnt impressed

forrestcupp
November 28th, 2011, 12:28 PM
Thanks I can go up to $400 so I was looking at the Acer but I'm not to sure of it, I have an Acer laptop and i wasnt impressed

If you can go up to $400, then I would seriously consider the ASUS Transformer. Other than the new Transformer Prime, it's the only one with an IPS screen, like the iPad. It can handle nVidia 3D games that look almost as good as the Xbox 360. And also, it comes with the full version of Polaris Office, which is nice.

dRounse
November 28th, 2011, 10:42 PM
If you can go up to $400, then I would seriously consider the ASUS Transformer. Other than the new Transformer Prime, it's the only one with an IPS screen, like the iPad. It can handle nVidia 3D games that look almost as good as the Xbox 360. And also, it comes with the full version of Polaris Office, which is nice.


Thanks I'll take a look at that one today.

dRounse
November 29th, 2011, 12:58 AM
I like the ASUS Transformer, but I have a couple of questions. And they are due to BestBuy's lack of clear description on the items.
First Question:
Some tablets say hard drive others say memory, I know they are both referring to the amount it can hold but do some come with a hard drive? Or just flash memory? And if they come in both which is better?

Second Question:
Most come in 16GB and 32GB, but have SD slots in them, If it comes with 16GB can I put a 32GB SD card in it, and have a total of 48GB?

shuttleworthwannabe
November 29th, 2011, 10:26 AM
In all honesty, tablets are an over-hyped luxury toy.
I bought an acer A500 and it was fun to play with for about 2 weeks.
Unless you have a specific use in mind it just ends up lying on the
coffee table to be played with occasionally while watching TV.

I am experiencing this myself I have Acer A501 Android 3.1; I mainly use it to check my emails when I am lazy to switch my laptop on. It is lying on my coffee table right now. Unless you have a special reason to use tablets, I would not spend that much money on it. Rather get an iPhone or other smart phone--it does the same thing and is more mobile and convenient.

stinkeye
November 29th, 2011, 11:02 AM
I am experiencing this myself I have Acer A501 Android 3.1; I mainly use it to check my emails when I am lazy to switch my laptop on. It is lying on my coffee table right now. Unless you have a special reason to use tablets, I would not spend that much money on it. Rather get an iPhone or other smart phone--it does the same thing and is more mobile and convenient.

Nielsen finds 70% of tablets used while watching TV (http://www.electronista.com/articles/11/05/19/nielsen.shows.tablet.phone.e.reader.habits/)

Tablet owners are most often doing something else while they use their devices, Nielsen found in an uncommon look at how users depend on the iPad, tablets and other devices like e-readers. A full 70 percent of US tablet owners say they use their devices while watching TV, and the viewing time represents about 30 percent of the time spent. The next favorite place was in bed, at 57 percent of people and 21 percent of their time.

Copper Bezel
November 29th, 2011, 01:18 PM
I think you're misreading that. It's not that 70% of tablets are used exclusively while watching TV. It's that 70% of tablets are sometimes used when the TV is on.

Followed up with "in bed", which shouldn't surprise anyone, since tablets are the new e-readers.

stinkeye
November 29th, 2011, 02:26 PM
It's a copy and paste job so I haven't misread anything.
What I'm pointing out is a lot of people, including me, don't actually
know how much different it is working with a tablet than a pc before you use it, and it ends up
just being used for a little bit of web browsing or reading.
After using a tablet I think I would have been better off buying a netbook
or notebook.
Touch is cool but it just doesn't have the functionality of a mouse(touchpad) and keyboard.

Copper Bezel
November 29th, 2011, 02:50 PM
Yeah, but I think it's a phenomenon of the fact that most folks with tablets are early adopters and folks who can afford to treat them as toys as much as anything. There are some very nice keyboard docks, too (not just the Transformer - there's even an equivalent for the iPad 2) and I wouldn't personally even consider getting a tablet without one.

I mean, your original suggestion was not to buy a tablet without a specific use in mind, which to me implies a specialized use case for a specific task. I'm disagreeing with that on the grounds that I've known people who can get by with an iPad as their only PC. I'm not at all disagreeing with the notion that a sensible buyer needs to know what the device is capable of and have a clear idea of the uses he or she intends to put it to.

I'd just imagine that someone with a desktop PC at home deciding between a netbook and a slate for mobile uses really can have equally good reasons for choosing one or the other. The slate's going to be lighter, it's better for reading, and it's more likely to have a data plan and better battery life, but it's less likely to have a keyboard and has some additional software limitations. It comes down to specific requirements and specific use cases, sure, but most things do. Netbooks are toys for a lot of people, too, but I live in one. = )

The OP, though, is getting this thing for Christmas and wants to know what he can play with. It really sounds like a "toy" use case to begin with, and there's nothing wrong with that, either.

stinkeye
November 29th, 2011, 03:26 PM
Yes, very eloquent dissertation.
For some reason I feel like I've been dragged on to stage at a high school debate. ;)
In summation, the red team would just like to say in their opinion
Tablets are crap.
:rolleyes:

Copper Bezel
November 29th, 2011, 03:43 PM
= )

forrestcupp
November 29th, 2011, 03:46 PM
I like the ASUS Transformer, but I have a couple of questions. And they are due to BestBuy's lack of clear description on the items.
First Question:
Some tablets say hard drive others say memory, I know they are both referring to the amount it can hold but do some come with a hard drive? Or just flash memory? And if they come in both which is better?To my knowledge, there are no modern tablets that use a hard drive. They all use flash memory. Part of the point of a tablet is to get it as thin and light as possible for portability and comfort. They're going to stay as far away from hard drives as they can.


Second Question:
Most come in 16GB and 32GB, but have SD slots in them, If it comes with 16GB can I put a 32GB SD card in it, and have a total of 48GB?Yes, you're right. If you don't have the keyboard attachment, you'll have to use a microSD card. But you're right; you'll have your original 16GB plus the 32GB you put in it. It will appear as two SD cards though, so it doesn't just extend what you have seamlessly. If you get a Transformer, you won't be sorry. It's top of the line until the next gen tablets are out.


As for the whole debate of whether tablets are useful or not, I'm very happy that I got mine. If they are useless to you, that's fine. But that doesn't mean they are useless to everyone. I'm getting a lot of productive use out of mine in ways that a laptop or netbook wouldn't suffice. I'll admit that my uses are specialized, but aside from that, they're just cool and fun. What's wrong with that? If every gadget had to be productive, then no one would have a PS3 or Xbox 360.

I don't have mine in front of me for 10 hours a day, but I do get a lot of use out of it, and I'm not sorry I got it at all. If you really want a tablet, don't pay attention to the naysayers. They have the right to not want one, just like we have the right to want one.

cloyd
November 29th, 2011, 04:40 PM
What would I use a tablet for? I didn't think I needed a smart phone . . . till I got one. I love it (android). I've found I love
1) reading with kindle, nook, google books, and alkido all on one machine. I prefer the nook, but the selection isn't as good in my area of interest.
2) It is good for watching movies when I don't like what others are watching on TV.
3) It is a great auto mp3 player.
4) Though I haven't rooted it, I can mess with it a bit and file browsers and a terminal emulator are available.
5) Email while traveling.
6) A secure internet connection while traveling. Wireless access when I am staying with family with no wireless, which is frequent while spending time at my father's house.

The the drawbacks all involve the small screen. I also use the phone for notes when speaking or teaching a class. In this case, a larger screen would be really nice, and the ability to use a full size keyboard would be nice . . . to create documents w/o having to create them on a computer and transfer them over.

I can live without a tablet, but I think I'd really enjoy a good android tablet.

I've messed with my wife's iPhone a bit. Hate it. Think I'd feel the same about an iPad. Reason: you must have iTunes to easily transfer files between computer and phone for most apps. And, I haven't found a file browser yet for the thing.

I don't go to an office, electronice store, or a Wal-Mart without looking at tablets.

forrestcupp
November 29th, 2011, 05:49 PM
The the drawbacks all involve the small screen. I also use the phone for notes when speaking or teaching a class. In this case, a larger screen would be really nice, and the ability to use a full size keyboard would be nice . . . to create documents w/o having to create them on a computer and transfer them over.

That's actually my main productive use for my Transformer. I use it for speaking notes, and it works great. I rarely use my printer now that I use my tablet for speaking notes. I also like the Kindle app a lot. It's much better on a tablet than on a smartphone.

The good thing about the Transformer is that you can spend another $150 to get a keyboard attachment that transforms it into an Android netbook. The attachment doubles the battery life and includes full size USB and SD slots. I don't have the attachment, though. The way I get around it is by typing all of my notes on my laptop and saving them to my Dropbox folder. Then I can just access those files from Dropbox on my tablet. It works really well.

But you can't get a data plan with the Transformer. You have to have wifi to access the net. If you need a data plan, you pretty much have to buy whatever your wireless carrier sells.

dRounse
November 29th, 2011, 08:07 PM
I am experiencing this myself I have Acer A501 Android 3.1; I mainly use it to check my emails when I am lazy to switch my laptop on. It is lying on my coffee table right now. Unless you have a special reason to use tablets, I would not spend that much money on it. Rather get an iPhone or other smart phone--it does the same thing and is more mobile and convenient.

I have an iPod Touch 4th Gen. but my computers run Linux, so updating music is a pain because I have to use my brothers computer, so an iPhone IMO wouldn't be much better, I am actually getting a new phone tomorrow definitely an Android. I do have a laptop but the fan is broken and makes an awful clicking noise, so I don't use that as much. My desktop on the other hand is awesome, but I always feel trapped in my basement. So I feel like a tablet would be better for when I want to leave my basement, but need to get stuff done, school work mostly.




The OP, though, is getting this thing for Christmas and wants to know what he can play with. It really sounds like a "toy" use case to begin with, and there's nothing wrong with that, either.

I wouldn't say it's going to be a toy necessarily because I am going to use this for what my laptop would be used for, and one quick question... Can I write programs on the tablet? I don't need to run them on the tablet, if not I suppose I could just save them as plain text and save them to my server, and run on my desktop. I plan on getting a new laptop next year for college.




Yes, you're right. If you don't have the keyboard attachment, you'll have to use a microSD card. But you're right; you'll have your original 16GB plus the 32GB you put in it. It will appear as two SD cards though, so it doesn't just extend what you have seamlessly. If you get a Transformer, you won't be sorry. It's top of the line until the next gen tablets are out.


So if it takes it as two SD cards, it would look like inserting one into a computer? Like the main one would have the OS and that stuff, while the second one would mount and be accessible like on a desktop. Sorry if that's way off. And I do think I am going to get a Transformer after all this talk about how good it is :)



The good thing about the Transformer is that you can spend another $150 to get a keyboard attachment that transforms it into an Android netbook. The attachment doubles the battery life and includes full size USB and SD slots. I don't have the attachment, though. The way I get around it is by typing all of my notes on my laptop and saving them to my Dropbox folder. Then I can just access those files from Dropbox on my tablet. It works really well.

But you can't get a data plan with the Transformer. You have to have wifi to access the net. If you need a data plan, you pretty much have to buy whatever your wireless carrier sells.

The keyboard attachment sounds really awesome, I'll probably get that later though.

And I don't really need a data plan, because it is pretty much going to stay in my house or be in my grandparents house... I'm not one of those people that needs to be connected to the internet, checking facebook, updating twitter all the time.

Thanks everyone for all the advice... I think I am going to get the Transformer.

forrestcupp
November 29th, 2011, 11:39 PM
I wouldn't say it's going to be a toy necessarily because I am going to use this for what my laptop would be used for, and one quick question... Can I write programs on the tablet? I don't need to run them on the tablet, if not I suppose I could just save them as plain text and save them to my server, and run on my desktop. I plan on getting a new laptop next year for college.Android isn't the best platform for writing programs with. You could use Polaris Office or some text editor app and save them to your server, but you're not going to be compiling anything in Android. Also, until you get the keyboard attachment, typing anything substantial sucks. Tablets are good for complementing your laptop, but not replacing it. Even with the keyboard attachment, you'll find that there are things you want to do that just isn't going to happen in Android or any other mobile OS.



So if it takes it as two SD cards, it would look like inserting one into a computer? Like the main one would have the OS and that stuff, while the second one would mount and be accessible like on a desktop. Sorry if that's way off. And I do think I am going to get a Transformer after all this talk about how good it is :)That's right, but Android doesn't really work like a desktop OS. Any app you install will go on the built in SD card, then you can get into the App settings and move it to the 2nd SD card if that app supports it. Of course you can put all your music, videos, and other files on your 2nd SD card.



Thanks everyone for all the advice... I think I am going to get the Transformer.As long as you don't expect Android to be a full featured desktop OS that can do everything Windows or Ubuntu can do, I think you'll be very pleased. Just remember that tablets complement PCs, they don't replace them, especially if you do a lot of programming.

dRounse
November 30th, 2011, 12:41 AM
Android isn't the best platform for writing programs with. You could use Polaris Office or some text editor app and save them to your server, but you're not going to be compiling anything in Android. Also, until you get the keyboard attachment, typing anything substantial sucks. Tablets are good for complementing your laptop, but not replacing it. Even with the keyboard attachment, you'll find that there are things you want to do that just isn't going to happen in Android or any other mobile OS.


That's right, but Android doesn't really work like a desktop OS. Any app you install will go on the built in SD card, then you can get into the App settings and move it to the 2nd SD card if that app supports it. Of course you can put all your music, videos, and other files on your 2nd SD card.


As long as you don't expect Android to be a full featured desktop OS that can do everything Windows or Ubuntu can do, I think you'll be very pleased. Just remember that tablets complement PCs, they don't replace them, especially if you do a lot of programming.

I don't need to compile programs, I'm taking programming classes and it seems like it would be easy to put in the program so I have it saved, and then work on it and compile it when I'm on my desktop.

Also the SD i put in would only be used for music and maybe some books, it really depends on how soon I can set up my server. I only wanted to know about the SD cards to see if there was really a difference between the 16GB and 32GB models.

I just need the tablet to compliment my desktop, when I don't want to be on it or can't be on it. Plus it will be nice to watch Netflix on it because I can't watch Netflix on my desktop, because its linux. Also, just a random question... why is Netflix supported on Linux?

forrestcupp
November 30th, 2011, 03:10 AM
Also the SD i put in would only be used for music and maybe some books, it really depends on how soon I can set up my server.I've found that Dropbox is great for sharing files between a tablet and a PC. You should check it out if you haven't already. On the PC, the files are actually stored locally and automatically synced with their online server. But on the tablet, the files aren't stored locally; they're just downloaded when you need them. That way you're not taking up any of your SD card space.


Plus it will be nice to watch Netflix on it because I can't watch Netflix on my desktop, because its linux. Also, just a random question... why is Netflix supported on Linux?Netflix works through an Android app, but it is not supported on GNU/Linux distros. Android uses the Linux kernel, but it is not a GNU/Linux distro. It's a whole OS of its own on top of the Linux kernel. Android is not any more GNU/Linux than MacOS X is BSD. That's why Android apps don't work in Linux and Linux apps don't work in Android.

dRounse
November 30th, 2011, 07:46 AM
I've found that Dropbox is great for sharing files between a tablet and a PC. You should check it out if you haven't already. On the PC, the files are actually stored locally and automatically synced with their online server. But on the tablet, the files aren't stored locally; they're just downloaded when you need them. That way you're not taking up any of your SD card space.

Netflix works through an Android app, but it is not supported on GNU/Linux distros. Android uses the Linux kernel, but it is not a GNU/Linux distro. It's a whole OS of its own on top of the Linux kernel. Android is not any more GNU/Linux than MacOS X is BSD. That's why Android apps don't work in Linux and Linux apps don't work in Android.

I do use Dropbox, I like it but I don't want to pay $99 a year to get 50GB so I'll make a server and then the 2GB should be fine for what I need.

And i was thinking more in general why doesnt Linux support Netflix?

forrestcupp
November 30th, 2011, 02:29 PM
I do use Dropbox, I like it but I don't want to pay $99 a year to get 50GB so I'll make a server and then the 2GB should be fine for what I need. Yeah, if you need more than 2GB, Dropbox is not right. I use it mostly for temporarily sharing files, so I don't really need that much space. Having your own server would be cool, if you can get Android to recognize it. I don't know much about that.


And i was thinking more in general why doesnt Linux support Netflix?Linux would probably love to support Netflix. The question is, why doesn't Netflix support Linux? There are a lot of possible answers for that question.

Remember, Netflix didn't just work on Android immediately. It was a little later on that Netflix specifically created an app to make it work in Android. It was in their best interest, seeing how Android is the most used phone OS out of all of the smartphones. Linux on the desktop is a much different story. They probably don't care to waste their time changing everything to a different format to support less than 1% of the desktop market.

dRounse
November 30th, 2011, 09:33 PM
Remember, Netflix didn't just work on Android immediately. It was a little later on that Netflix specifically created an app to make it work in Android. It was in their best interest, seeing how Android is the most used phone OS out of all of the smartphones. Linux on the desktop is a much different story. They probably don't care to waste their time changing everything to a different format to support less than 1% of the desktop market.

Why don't they (netflix) give the source code to linux developers and let them make it compatible, because Netflix is also supported on googles desktop Chrome OS, which if I'm not mistaken is Linux based.

sandyd
November 30th, 2011, 10:20 PM
Yeah, if you need more than 2GB, Dropbox is not right. I use it mostly for temporarily sharing files, so I don't really need that much space. Having your own server would be cool, if you can get Android to recognize it. I don't know much about that.

Linux would probably love to support Netflix. The question is, why doesn't Netflix support Linux? There are a lot of possible answers for that question.

Remember, Netflix didn't just work on Android immediately. It was a little later on that Netflix specifically created an app to make it work in Android. It was in their best interest, seeing how Android is the most used phone OS out of all of the smartphones. Linux on the desktop is a much different story. They probably don't care to waste their time changing everything to a different format to support less than 1% of the desktop market.
Get your own server.

Run OpenCloud. Sync VIA webdav.

Copper Bezel
November 30th, 2011, 10:39 PM
Why don't they (netflix) give the source code to linux developers and let them make it compatible, because Netflix is also supported on googles desktop Chrome OS, which if I'm not mistaken is Linux based.
As you're yourself hinting, it's not a technology problem. The Chromebook OS has support for Netflix through Chrome's Native Client and a Netflix plugin (which aren't fully functional in the current desktop version of Chrome) and it is, as you say, fully GNU / Linux. (Interestingly, however, the plugin doesn't run if the Chromebook is in "developer mode.") There's the possibility that there's simply no incentive to develop the plugin further for other platforms, but it's also suggested that any particular blend of desktop Linux doesn't offer the kind of content protection that other platforms do (although it's apparently amusingly simple to rip movies using the Playstation 3 app, too.)

djsephiroth
November 30th, 2011, 11:04 PM
In all honesty, tablets are an over-hyped luxury toy.
I bought an acer A500 and it was fun to play with for about 2 weeks.
Unless you have a specific use in mind it just ends up lying on the
coffee table to be played with occasionally while watching TV.

Conversely, I use my A500 on a regular basis. It has caused my netbook to be relegated to a shelf, where it remains unused, while the A500 has usurped its place.

The tablet has exhibited a battery life more similar to a phone than a laptop or netbook. I don't have to boot it up and log in. In these ways it's been very handy for the times when I want to quickly do something online and then go back to my business - much more so than my netbook or laptops. It's "right there" and "just works", if you will.

I own a beefy laptop, and the A500 is a good complement to it. If I had a lightweight laptop as my primary machine, I would probably not use the A500, or any tablet, or even a netbook - I'd use the laptop. That said, I think it's a good thing to have in my situation. I didn't have a specific use in mind when I purchased it - it was to me a toy or sorts, after all - but I have found for it many a use. Carting around my 10-lb laptop, finding an outlet for its 100-minute battery, locating a surface upon which it can rest - all alleviated by the tablet.

I would recommend the A500, the Transformer, or the Xoom. The Transformer Prime - and anything with the Tegra3 - is a compelling bit of evidence in the argument that ARM is getting into a position to rival x86 in the relatively near future. Go for a 10" tablet - the 7" ones are just large phones that can't make calls. On the larger screens, you can see a real difference in the made-for-tablet apps. A USB host port is very useful, and it is lamentable that not all tablets have one. The ability to plug in a large hard drive, USB stick, or keyboard is a major bonus to me.

One thing I did not expect was the high quality audio in the A500. It drives my headphones with no issues, has plenty of headroom, and the sound is very "full". Might not matter to most, but it is worth mentioning. I am now curious as to how the other tablets might have sounded.

forrestcupp
November 30th, 2011, 11:20 PM
A USB host port is very useful, and it is lamentable that not all tablets have one. The ability to plug in a large hard drive, USB stick, or keyboard is a major bonus to me.

One thing I did not expect was the high quality audio in the A500. It drives my headphones with no issues, has plenty of headroom, and the sound is very "full". Might not matter to most, but it is worth mentioning. I am now curious as to how the other tablets might have sounded.The USB host and audio were definitely draws for the Acer when I was researching them. When I took the time to think about how I would be using my tablet, I concluded that I probably wouldn't use a host USB port enough for that to be a priority. Having a really good screen was more important to me, and that's why I went with the Transformer and its IPS screen. The Transformer has pretty good sound for a tablet, but it's probably not quite as good as the Acer. I think the Transformer is a little thinner.

Every tablet in that price range has its pluses and minuses, and it's not one size fits all. You have to weigh which features will fit your personal needs. But I will say that the A500 was at the top of my list when I was researching them.

djsephiroth
December 1st, 2011, 10:32 PM
Yeah, it was a tough decision for me between the ASUS and the Acer. I had to hang out in a Best Buy for over an hour with both of them side by side, running the same stuff at the same time. I don't think anyone could go wrong with either one.

Has anyone put Ubuntu on an Android tablet? I have been curious about how stable and feasible it is.