PDA

View Full Version : Netbooks



Centropolis
November 9th, 2011, 03:02 AM
I know there are people out there that runs Ubuntu (or other distros) on their netbooks. I am wondering since Linux and hardware compatibility is an issue, if there are brands of netbooks that I should avoid (in general) because they are known to have problems with Ubuntu (and just Linux in general)?

Not really issues with the netbooks themselves but just looking at it from a compatibility with Ubuntu standpoint.

Also as a side topic, are there brands of netbooks out there that runs cooler than most? I hate heat problems on laptops.

Primefalcon
November 9th, 2011, 03:10 AM
I have an asus 900ha... everything works out of the box perfectly so... yeah I'd problem recommend looking at asus

Copper Bezel
November 9th, 2011, 03:12 AM
Yeah, I don't hear of a lot of compatibility problems with Asus, and I'm a very happy Eee user myself. Just install Jupiter for ACPI scripting after you set up, and you're golden.

JDShu
November 9th, 2011, 03:13 AM
I use an Asus P1015 eeepc and everything except wireless worked OOTB. With the recent merge of the broadcom drivers from staging, I expect that will change.

Old_Grey_Wolf
November 9th, 2011, 03:26 AM
Brands do not tell you very much about compatibility with Ubuntu. I have a Toshiba N305 Netbook that works out-of-the-box with Ubuntu; however, many Toshiba Netbooks do not work well, if at all with Ubuntu.

I did my research at various Linux forums, and looked at the hardware specs for graphic and network cards before purchasing the one I have.

mamamia88
November 9th, 2011, 03:36 AM
I have a samsung n130 and while wireless worked out of the box it would stop working after suspend until i rebooted but i was able to fix it enough googling. all in all very satisfied

wolfen69
November 9th, 2011, 05:05 AM
Generally speaking, netbooks with all Intel chipsets are just about guaranteed to work well. My Acer Aspire One 532 runs like a dream with Lubuntu 11.10

KBD47
November 9th, 2011, 05:38 AM
Lubuntu and Xubuntu 11.10 both rock on my Acer Aspire One D255E
You might want to use Jupiter with Xubuntu to help keep it cool, Lubuntu does pretty well without Jupiter. Wireless works far better in the 11.10 vs 11.04 version.

wolfen69
November 9th, 2011, 07:04 AM
Lubuntu and Xubuntu 11.10 both rock on my Acer Aspire One D255E
You might want to use Jupiter with Xubuntu to help keep it cool, Lubuntu does pretty well without Jupiter. Wireless works far better in the 11.10 vs 11.04 version.

I've only not used ubuntu for one release, and that's because 11.04 didn't do gnome 3 properly. In the meantime I used Fedora and it was really good, but I find networking to be really fast in ubuntu. I'm back with 11.10. I'm getting speeds I've never had before. Either the kernel team or canonical did a great job tweaking the wireless drivers. Kudos. Bittorrent, and surfing in general is very fast in 11.10. I couldn't be any happier. :)

KBD47
November 9th, 2011, 07:22 AM
I've only not used ubuntu for one release, and that's because 11.04 didn't do gnome 3 properly. In the meantime I used Fedora and it was really good, but I find networking to be really fast in ubuntu. I'm back with 11.10. I'm getting speeds I've never had before. Either the kernel team or canonical did a great job tweaking the wireless drivers. Kudos. Bittorrent, and surfing in general is very fast in 11.10. I couldn't be any happier. :)

I knew things were looking good in 11.10 when it searched the networks the first time and picked up every wireless signal in the neighborhood :-) Wireless worked in 11.04, but it would get slow and lose the signal, 11.10 is great and I'm guessing I get better wireless support from the 3.0 kernel. I was having some flash/video problems in 11.10 but started using html5 in place of flash and all is good again.
KBD47

Bazon
November 9th, 2011, 07:24 AM
I have a Samsung N150 and everything works fine. Just for brightness control by keys I had to install samsung-tools from the voria repository but that was no problem.

V for Vincent
November 9th, 2011, 07:27 AM
I run ubuntu 11.10 on an Asus 1201N. Generally like it very much, but I do get a complete lockup every two weeks or so. Just installed lubuntu on my brother's acer aspire one and that ran great.

wolfen69
November 9th, 2011, 07:58 AM
I knew things were looking good in 11.10 when it searched the networks the first time and picked up every wireless signal in the neighborhood :-) Wireless worked in 11.04, but it would get slow and lose the signal, 11.10 is great and I'm guessing I get better wireless support from the 3.0 kernel. I was having some flash/video problems in 11.10 but started using html5 in place of flash and all is good again.
KBD47

I have 11.10 installed on 3 different computers and couldn't be happier. Ubuntu, Kubuntu, and Lubuntu. To me, it's one of the best releases ever.

KBD47
November 9th, 2011, 08:07 AM
I have 11.10 installed on 3 different computers and couldn't be happier. Ubuntu, Kubuntu, and Lubuntu. To me, it's one of the best releases ever.

I'm more of a Xubuntu and Lubuntu fan. I can tweak Xubuntu a bit to get it where I want it. Lubuntu is just freakin awesome, lightning fast, simple user interface. I think of it as the mini-XP of Linux :-)
KBD47

wolfen69
November 9th, 2011, 08:15 AM
I'm more of a Xubuntu and Lubuntu fan. I can tweak Xubuntu a bit to get it where I want it. Lubuntu is just freakin awesome, lightning fast, simple user interface. I think of it as the mini-XP of Linux :-)
KBD47
I agree. If you like things simple, those 2 are perfect.



I think of it as the mini-XP of Linux :-)
KBD47

I disagree. ;) Since there are very few mini-xp installs in the wild, I'd say Lubuntu is standing on solid ground....

KBD47
November 9th, 2011, 08:34 AM
[QUOTE=wolfen69;11439820]I agree. If you like things simple, those 2 are perfect.


I've begun to appreciate light, fast, and simple more and more :-) I should also throw in reliable, I've only run into one small bug with Lubuntu regarding the battery indicator, otherwise no glitches.

Centropolis
November 9th, 2011, 10:55 PM
First of all, thanks for all the replies and comments.

However, I do have a question about Jupiter on Ubuntu/Lubuntu. A quick Google search tells me that it's an applet to monitor your battery performance on Ubuntu. But how does that help my netbook/laptop run cooler with this tool?

KBD47
November 9th, 2011, 11:09 PM
First of all, thanks for all the replies and comments.

However, I do have a question about Jupiter on Ubuntu/Lubuntu. A quick Google search tells me that it's an applet to monitor your battery performance on Ubuntu. But how does that help my netbook/laptop run cooler with this tool?

Jupiter doesn't work well with Lubuntu. It works fine with Xubuntu. As to how it saves battery and keeps the machine running cooler I can't say, I can just tell you I notice a difference using it.
KBD47

Copper Bezel
November 10th, 2011, 05:36 AM
It controls your CPU scaling. Modern processors have a series of power modes that allow your processor to drop to a lower speed when you're using only a certain percentage of its speed. That means that for viewing documents or browsing the web, your 1.6 Ghz processor acts like a 800 Mhz processor, then snaps back to 1.6 mode when you start a video or Compiz does a window effect or whatever. In the low-power mode, the processor uses less electric power and the fan isn't needed. It makes a substantial difference in your power consumption and can add hours to your battery life, depending on the total capacity. Almost more importantly, it means that your netbook runs cool and quiet whenever possible. Jupiter is a very nicely-written set of ACPI, or power management, scripts that allow you to set your preferred power mode for on- and off-AC performance so that you never have to toggle a power mode or anything.