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View Full Version : Anyone ever go through an MIT Open Course Ware lecture?



samalex
June 21st, 2011, 11:00 PM
I've started going through some of the lectures on the MIT Open Courseware website - http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm - and they're quite simply amazing. I'm going through some of the Physics lectures by Walter Lewin and it's actually quite entertaining. I'm thinking of actually getting one of the books and going through the course as a whole.

Anyone else ever done this before? Just curious --

Sam

sffvba[e0rt
June 21st, 2011, 11:06 PM
I can remember a few years back I linked to some videos and papers that where marked "open course ware" from MIT but I never really looked that closely... there is an amazing amount of courses... I am in awe... This will keep me busy A LONG TIME!!!


404

PS - Self Learner... I like that idea... already picked a first course and signed up for a study group... Calculus... I will master thee!!!!

drawkcab
June 22nd, 2011, 08:07 PM
This is a really good idea for folks who want to educate themselves but don't necessarily need a degree.

MIT's OCW site is really just one of many possibilities. By now you can google syllabi for thousands of courses. You can find GBs of books, audio books, audio and video lectures that are being shared.

If you're self-motivated, it's funny how much faster you can learn on your own.

goodbyemrevans
June 23rd, 2011, 06:00 AM
I've just started working my way through the OCW scholar version of single-variable calculus - I can't say the lectures are 'entertaining,' but it's a fantastic resource.

sffvba[e0rt
June 24th, 2011, 06:24 AM
I've just started working my way through the OCW scholar version of single-variable calculus - I can't say the lectures are 'entertaining,' but it's a fantastic resource.

I just started looking a this one too... I suspect I will have to go back and brush up on my Algebra first a bit, it has just been too many years :/


404

Legendary_Bibo
June 24th, 2011, 07:10 AM
I've just started working my way through the OCW scholar version of single-variable calculus - I can't say the lectures are 'entertaining,' but it's a fantastic resource.

ಠ_ಠ

I'm a math major, all math is entertaining.

Dustin2128
June 24th, 2011, 07:37 AM
Skipping around a few programming lectures. Interesting stuff. +1 to Legendary_Bibo (except statistics ;))

Legendary_Bibo
June 24th, 2011, 07:43 AM
Skipping around a few programming lectures. Interesting stuff. +1 to Legendary_Bibo (except statistics ;))

Statistics is the misused branch of math, and it's so heavily abused for media purposes

jfreak_
June 24th, 2011, 10:08 AM
On a somewhat related note , I couldn't resisting posting this, http://www.nptel.iitm.ac.in/ (http://www.nptel.iitm.ac.in/)its a set of video/web lectures from my college, mostly on engineering. Its somewhat useful too, especially for someone who doesn't go to a top notch college.

Glenn Jones
June 24th, 2011, 10:53 AM
I'm hoping to move into more numerical modeling/applied mathematics stuff and these lectures are great for revision/self learning. There is a wealth of literature on the internet along with few (second hand) text books and you can go far.

rewyllys
June 24th, 2011, 04:04 PM
ಠ_ಠ

I'm a math major, all math is entertaining.
Ditto for me.:D

WRT the MIT Open Course Ware courses, in the mathematics courses I've been especially favorably impressed by those taught by Gilbert Strang. He's a fantastic teacher!

koleoptero
June 24th, 2011, 07:19 PM
ಠ_ಠ

I'm a math major, all math is entertaining.

I disagree with you. Anything that has to do with differential equations is completely disgusting.

koenn
June 27th, 2011, 10:27 PM
I've started going through some of the lectures on the MIT Open Courseware website - http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm - and they're quite simply amazing. ... it's actually quite entertaining. I'm thinking of actually getting one of the books and going through the course as a whole.

Anyone else ever done this before? Just curious --

Sam

I agree.
It's interesting and entertaining.and pretty amazing those things are just there for whoever wants it.

I watched the first sessions of Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs and read the first few chapters of the corresponding book - after those, it gets rather complex, so you need to focus and pay attention and probably try some of the exercises etc, and I haven't had the time to do that.

tgalati4
June 27th, 2011, 11:36 PM
I'm might try a few. Just to bring back memories.

F.G.
June 27th, 2011, 11:52 PM
I saw a couple of the MIT ones, about computer science and programming (which introduced python), and thought that they were good and easy to watch, but also quite slow moving (i think that there were 24 in the whole series). in contrast i saw some googletech developer talks about python which were really fast moving and great, only about 4 lectures and i feel like i've learned a bunch (for those impatient like myself), really packed with info. I also saw some of the MIT ones about calculus and like them too... so only good things to saw about that.

ice60
June 28th, 2011, 01:00 AM
i watch them on youtube sometimes. are they the same??
http://www.youtube.com/user/MIT

there are loads of similar pages -
http://www.youtube.com/user/UCBerkeley
http://www.youtube.com/user/YaleCourses etc

i was trying to find a series of lectures i liked but can't find them. i'll post this link anyway :P
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tf9QJ02VkhU

the last ones i watched were about entropy. i'm not sure i learned much - still clueless.