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VOT Productions
June 11th, 2011, 10:36 PM
Why is WUBI here? WUBI has sooo much flaws that Chuck Norris can't solve. Jokes aside, you get slower performance (unnoticable on newer PCs), more instability, more breakage, etc.
Just use Live USB with persistence.

Thewhistlingwind
June 11th, 2011, 10:40 PM
Why is WUBI here? WUBI has sooo much flaws that Chuck Norris can't solve. Jokes aside, you get slower performance, more instability, more breakage, etc.

So that people can Demo ubuntu without installing it.

It's better then a LiveCD, and below a LiveUSB.

Hierarchy of Ubuntu installs:

Preinstalled
Custom from mini.iso
Vanilla install
Virtualbox
LiveUSB
WUBI
LiveCD

Paqman
June 11th, 2011, 10:41 PM
you get slower performance

The performance drop is very small, you'd be unlikely to ever notice it.

Wubi is a bit unstable at the mo, which is a shame. The objective is excellent. Partitioning is a genuine point of uncertainty and stress for new users, if we can offer them a way to avoid it then that significantly lowers the difficulty of their first install.

Frogs Hair
June 11th, 2011, 10:46 PM
Wubi gives people the chance to try Ubuntu before committing to a traditional dual boot or switching completely . I used Wubi when I started and know four people using it without the issues you describe . If Windows is well maintained a Wubi installation runs pretty well.

Do you have a support question that involves a Wubi installation ?

VOT Productions
June 11th, 2011, 11:00 PM
No, I have a rant :)

beew
June 11th, 2011, 11:03 PM
The best way to test Ubuntu would be a full install in an external hard drive.

magmon
June 12th, 2011, 12:56 AM
I'd have to agree that the instability is absolutely unacceptable. Every one of my installations managed to self-nuke within a week.

3rdalbum
June 12th, 2011, 02:12 AM
Wubi is a bit unstable at the mo, which is a shame.

It's always been unstable from what I hear, and it depends on Windows being able to boot, too (if Windows can't boot properly, it will not cleanly unmount the filesystem, so the Ubuntu NTFS driver won't touch it, so the root.disk will not be found and Ubuntu won't start up).

Old_Grey_Wolf
June 12th, 2011, 02:18 AM
I'd have to agree that the instability is absolutely unacceptable. Every one of my installations managed to self-nuke within a week.

So did mine.

Paqman
June 12th, 2011, 06:02 AM
It's always been unstable from what I hear

I tried it out of curiosity when it was new, and found it perfectly good. We certainly didn't used to get so many people washing up with b0rked systems in the forums back than.

Timmer1240
June 12th, 2011, 06:14 AM
Im glad there was wubi thats how I tryed ubuntu it self nuked a few times but I enjoyed it so well I repartitioned and installed Karmic in its own partition.I used Karmic for a year and now Ive moved on Im running Linux Mint Debian now wubi is ok as a test drive basis.

Gerontion
June 12th, 2011, 07:31 AM
The objective is excellent. Partitioning is a genuine point of uncertainty and stress for new users, if we can offer them a way to avoid it then that significantly lowers the difficulty of their first install.Absolutely. When I first installed Ubuntu, I spent hours staring at the partitioner, wondering if I was about to destroy my computer; I would have been a lot happier if Wubi had been around to help. On the other hand, I did use it a year or two ago and the installation lasted significantly less than a month.

murderslastcrow
June 12th, 2011, 10:06 AM
I've never had significant problems with WUBI, even back in the day when I was installing it on computers with 512 MB of RAM or less. I think it'd be silly to go backwards on it just because it's not perfect, especially since a lot of that is due to NTFS being a horrible file system.

So long as people are aware that the performance can be better with a normal installation, it's good to get their feet wet and help them understand what Linux is without going through a small, but to some very mentally racking, experience of installing an OS. Given that Ubuntu is by far the most convenient OS to install, it's still an alien subject for people. If they can install Ubuntu like an application, that decreases their level of anxiety by quite a bit.

I think it's essential to adoption and overall comfort for new users to keep it, while I would encourage people to purchase Linux computers if they were more widely available.