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kevin11951
June 6th, 2011, 05:49 PM
I parroted this list from System76's website:


Application Hosting
Backup Server
Collaboration Wiki
Customer Relationship Management
Database Applications
Directory, DNS, and DHCP Services
Email Server
File and Print Services
Human Resources Management
VOIP Server
LTSP Deployments
Mission Critical Applications
Support Ticket Systems
Web Applications
Virtualization
Web Hosting


Does anyone have anything else Linux is good at, but is also useful for a business?

RiceMonster
June 6th, 2011, 05:51 PM
Mission Critical Applications



Just saying, that's a pretty generic term. "Mission Critical" applications could be pretty much anything.

pookiebear
June 6th, 2011, 07:29 PM
router
firewall
game server hosting


I think by mission critical the OP meant "real-time"
as in machine control like die cutting or CNC machines or manufacturing robotics controls.

swoll1980
June 6th, 2011, 07:32 PM
Linux is great for businesses that need custom solutions.

tgm4883
June 6th, 2011, 07:43 PM
router
firewall
game server hosting


I think by mission critical the OP meant "real-time"
as in machine control like die cutting or CNC machines or manufacturing robotics controls.

OP pulled it from System76. In any case, mission critical is a generic term.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mission_critical

Mission critical refers to any factor of a system (equipment, process, procedure, software, etc.) whose failure will result in the failure of business operations. That is, it is critical to the organization's 'mission'.

It has nothing to do with what job function the machine actually performs. For a marketing firm, email is mission critical. For a CNC machine, email isn't critical.

Dragonbite
June 6th, 2011, 08:13 PM
What about Firewall and Content Filtering?

papibe
June 6th, 2011, 08:39 PM
Mission Critical example: Linux powers world's fastest stock exchange (http://blogs.computerworld.com/14637/linux_powers_worlds_fastest_stock_exchange).

Edit: and this: NYSE undertakes IBM mainframe migration to Unix and Linux (http://searchdatacenter.techtarget.com/news/1254860/NYSE-undertakes-IBM-mainframe-migration-to-Unix-and-Linux).

Regards.

snowpine
June 6th, 2011, 08:40 PM
United States Navy nuclear submarine fleet runs on Linux (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Linux_adopters), now THAT's mission critical!

Dragonbite
June 6th, 2011, 08:41 PM
Any good POS applications (POS = Point of Sale, like a cash register)? If so (which I think is likely) then Ubuntu could be a cash register/POS system.

fuduntu
June 6th, 2011, 08:45 PM
router
firewall
game server hosting


I think by mission critical the OP meant "real-time"
as in machine control like die cutting or CNC machines or manufacturing robotics controls.

real-time isn't necessarily mission critical. You could have a real time stock feed on your web portal, but if it went down you didn't lose money.

Mission Critical means it costs money for every {second,minute,hour} of down-time.

fuduntu
June 6th, 2011, 08:45 PM
OP pulled it from System76. In any case, mission critical is a generic term.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mission_critical


It has nothing to do with what job function the machine actually performs. For a marketing firm, email is mission critical. For a CNC machine, email isn't critical.

DOH .. didn't see this before replying.

Ghost|BTFH
June 6th, 2011, 09:33 PM
Personally, I use it here at work as a desktop system that has a full suite of networking tools that even occasionally the admin pops over going "Hey, can you possibly..." "Yep...sec..."

Now granted, there's a lot of wizzy things he has custom set up for his Windows 7 box at work, but I didn't have to do too much to be able to run a lot of similar applications, other than download them.

What has taken him about a full year of grabbing, testing, adding, removing to get the "perfect network box" I was able to virtually duplicate in Ubuntu, in about 40 minutes installation time. (It's a slow computer)

However, on our ANCIENT computers out in the factory floor, we just run slackware because it's a tank that takes up nothing for resources.

Cheers,
Ghost|BTFH

kevin11951
June 6th, 2011, 10:14 PM
Any good POS applications (POS = Point of Sale, like a cash register)? If so (which I think is likely) then Ubuntu could be a cash register/POS system.

Open Bravo POS is pretty good...

http://www.openbravo.com/product/pos/

Works for both Restaurants and Retail

Gone fishing
June 6th, 2011, 11:03 PM
Any good POS applications (POS = Point of Sale, like a cash register)? If so (which I think is likely) then Ubuntu could be a cash register/POS system.

http://www.lemonpos.org/ is a Linux distro tailored as a POS

alphacrucis2
June 6th, 2011, 11:23 PM
Another use. VPN concentrator using OpenVPN server.

timZZ
June 7th, 2011, 01:15 AM
What do you mean? Linux is found in Cable boxes to Smart Phones.

Depends ... for a Cable company Linux is used in Cable boxes.

I know Linux is used heavily in the sciences etc.

It is going to be a long list.