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View Full Version : Is it true all TVs with rabbit ears only have access to free local channels?



brawnypandora0
June 6th, 2011, 03:27 AM
How come the TV radio transmission is able to pass through walls to the antenna?

papibe
June 6th, 2011, 03:33 AM
Yes. In the Dallas/FW area there are around 50 free over the air channels.

Regards.

3Miro
June 6th, 2011, 03:33 AM
When things appear solid, it is not because they are continuous entities of matter, but because they interact with other objects. A wall consists of many atoms and while atoms have electrons and nuclei, they are mostly empty space. Things get stopped by the walls because they interact with the electrons in the walls.

Radio waves do not interact with wood or concrete (or do so very weakly). If you have very thick walls or walls made of special materials, you can isolate radio signals. As is, radio transmitters are made strong enough so that they can penetrate regular walls.

With a rabbit year, you will notice considerably different strength and quality of the signal in different rooms or even parts of the room. Same with cell phone signals.

LowSky
June 6th, 2011, 03:34 AM
How come the TV radio transmission is able to pass through walls to the antenna?

Walls are not as solid as you may think... and neither are people.

Dustin2128
June 6th, 2011, 03:36 AM
Well, you'd have to buy a digital converter box, if you don't have a DTV, but yeah... I thought everyone knew? Not that there's much on- but not that there's much on paid TV either. Since it's gone digital though, quality is generally pretty good.

brawnypandora0
June 6th, 2011, 03:39 AM
1) How come all the new TVs sold in stores don't have any antennas when they're showing broadcasts?

2) Is it true that a building completely covered with metal with no doors cannot receive radio signals from the inside?

3) How come some channels appear brighter than others? I was watching a hockey game simultaneously on two channels one time and the arena appeared brighter on one channel than the other.

Dustin2128
June 6th, 2011, 03:53 AM
1) How come all the new TVs sold in stores don't have any antennas when they're showing broadcasts?

2) Is it true that a building completely covered with metal with no doors cannot receive radio signals from the inside?

3) How come some channels appear brighter than others? I was watching a hockey game simultaneously on two channels one time and the arena appeared brighter on one channel than the other.
Man, you've really not watched a lot of public broadcasts, have you? I feel old for some reason. They don't have antennae because 90% of people hook it into cable or sat anyway, so it saves on money, and I wouldn't be surprised if there's kick backs for doing that from networks. As for the building covered in metal, it depends on thickness, type of metal, etc. but in general, a civilian grade structure will not block out radio signals unless very specifically and specially built for said purpose. As for why some channels look different from others- radio wave TV is a crap shoot at best, you'll get loads of interference, whether constructive or destructive, and nobody minds much if you go down anyway. Unless someone has a better answer for number 3.

papibe
June 6th, 2011, 03:59 AM
1) How come all the new TVs sold in stores don't have any antennas when they're showing broadcasts?

They need a steady and strong signal, over the air signal suffers from short interruptions when severe weather is present.

Besides, there are more cool programming that attracts buyers if they use a paid service.


3) How come some channels appear brighter than others? I was watching a hockey game simultaneously on two channels one time and the arena appeared brighter on one channel than the other.
Because the game it is not transmitted directly from the stadium to your TV. Every network receives the signal puts their logo on it, and most certainly applies color filters to fit their standards.

Regards.

brawnypandora0
June 6th, 2011, 04:14 AM
Man, you've really not watched a lot of public broadcasts, have you? I feel old for some reason. They don't have antennae because 90% of people hook it into cable or sat anyway, so it saves on money, and I wouldn't be surprised if there's kick backs for doing that from networks. As for the building covered in metal, it depends on thickness, type of metal, etc. but in general, a civilian grade structure will not block out radio signals unless very specifically and specially built for said purpose. As for why some channels look different from others- radio wave TV is a crap shoot at best, you'll get loads of interference, whether constructive or destructive, and nobody minds much if you go down anyway. Unless someone has a better answer for number 3.

Why does it depend on the type of metal? What about zinc?

Dustin2128
June 6th, 2011, 04:16 AM
Why does it depend on the type of metal? What about zinc?
Well if you have walls of uranium, I'd say you're a lot more likely to block than if you had walls made of aluminum. Not that it really matters in civilian housing though.

vehemoth
June 6th, 2011, 04:20 AM
I think having a uranium house might matter in a civil environment ;)

Dustin2128
June 6th, 2011, 04:29 AM
I think having a uranium house might matter in a civil environment ;)
It's a disclaimer, mk?

dmizer
June 6th, 2011, 05:04 AM
If you are not using cable, then your TV picture is broadcast over radio signals just like the radio in your car, or your cell phone, or your wireless internet card. The same problems with all of these wireless devices also effect TV signals.

I am closing this thread. Although it's not a CoC violation there are much better places to learn about these things.

If you're curious, I suggest starting at http://www.howstuffworks.com/