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abre
May 27th, 2011, 10:02 PM
hi guys. i am newbe in ubuntu. i have lenovo g450 and has installed windows 7 ultimate for a long time ago. i want to try ubuntu natty in my lenovo with dual boot system. after loading natty disk and click on install ubuntu it said that this computer currently has no detected operating system and i have to choose erase disk and install ubuntu or something else. Could someone help me why the natty cant detect my windows 7? thanks a lot. i have created drive c with 50 gb for dual boot

Hedgehog1
May 28th, 2011, 01:05 AM
The most likely causes are:

[1] You made more than 4 primary partitions using the Windows Disk Manager, and it changes the partitions to an type that Linux does not (yet) understand)

[2] You have a mix of partition tables.

To figure out what you actual situation is, please do this so we can see what your options for installing might be:

Please boot off the LiveCD/LiveUSB, select 'TRY', and then:

http://bootinfoscript.sourceforge.net/
Follow the instruction on the website and post the results here.

Please press the '#' button when posting and place the the script results between the
& tags.

http://img854.imageshack.us/img854/4563/codetags.png


The Hedge

:KS

abre
May 28th, 2011, 12:55 PM
thanks Hedgehog1 (http://ubuntuforums.org/member.php?u=1230016), this is the result

Boot Info Script 0.60 from 17 May 2011


============================= Boot Info Summary: ===============================

=> Windows is installed in the MBR of /dev/sda.

sda1: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: No errors found in the Boot Parameter Block.
Operating System:
Boot files: /bootmgr /Boot/BCD

sda2: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: No errors found in the Boot Parameter Block.
Operating System: Windows 7
Boot files: /Windows/System32/winload.exe

sda3: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: Extended Partition
Boot sector type: -
Boot sector info:

sda5: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: According to the info in the boot sector, sda5 starts
at sector 2048.
Operating System:
Boot files:

sda6: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: According to the info in the boot sector, sda6 starts
at sector 1273. But according to the info from fdisk,
sda6 starts at sector 178270208.
Operating System:
Boot files:

sda7: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: According to the info in the boot sector, sda7 starts
at sector 1273. But according to the info from fdisk,
sda7 starts at sector 198750208.
Operating System:
Boot files:

sda8: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: According to the info in the boot sector, sda8 starts
at sector 2048.
Operating System:
Boot files:

============================ Drive/Partition Info: =============================

Drive: sda __________________________________________________ ___________________

Disk /dev/sda: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders, total 488397168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

Partition Boot Start Sector End Sector # of Sectors Id System

/dev/sda1 * 2,048 206,847 204,800 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS
/dev/sda2 206,848 102,591,089 102,384,242 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS
/dev/sda3 78,043,770 488,392,064 410,348,295 f W95 Extended (LBA)
/dev/sda5 102,594,560 178,268,934 75,674,375 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS
/dev/sda6 178,270,208 198,748,159 20,477,952 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS
/dev/sda7 198,750,208 324,284,415 125,534,208 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS
/dev/sda8 324,286,464 488,392,064 164,105,601 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS

/dev/sda2 overlaps with /dev/sda3

"blkid" output: __________________________________________________ ______________

Device UUID TYPE LABEL

/dev/loop0 squashfs
/dev/sda1 90F82BB7F82B9B0C ntfs System Reserved
/dev/sda2 0C9E70E49E70C7AA ntfs SYSTEM
/dev/sda5 02C47CEFC47CE677 ntfs ENTERTAINMENT
/dev/sda6 4ECA12C2CA12A66D ntfs DATA
/dev/sda7 5EFC2D38FC2D0C39 ntfs HOBI
/dev/sda8 1C88A08E88A0684A ntfs SOFTWARE

================================ Mount points: =================================

Device Mount_Point Type Options

/dev/loop0 /rofs squashfs (ro,noatime)
/dev/sr0 /cdrom iso9660 (ro,noatime)

abre
May 28th, 2011, 12:58 PM
oh my god :( i dont understand that all

coffeecat
May 28th, 2011, 01:32 PM
oh my god :( i dont understand that all

Fortunately, there are people here who do.

I'll repost your boot info script output in code tags, because it is difficult to read otherwise.


Boot Info Script 0.60 from 17 May 2011


============================= Boot Info Summary: ===============================

=> Windows is installed in the MBR of /dev/sda.

sda1: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: No errors found in the Boot Parameter Block.
Operating System:
Boot files: /bootmgr /Boot/BCD

sda2: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: No errors found in the Boot Parameter Block.
Operating System: Windows 7
Boot files: /Windows/System32/winload.exe

sda3: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: Extended Partition
Boot sector type: -
Boot sector info:

sda5: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: According to the info in the boot sector, sda5 starts
at sector 2048.
Operating System:
Boot files:

sda6: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: According to the info in the boot sector, sda6 starts
at sector 1273. But according to the info from fdisk,
sda6 starts at sector 178270208.
Operating System:
Boot files:

sda7: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: According to the info in the boot sector, sda7 starts
at sector 1273. But according to the info from fdisk,
sda7 starts at sector 198750208.
Operating System:
Boot files:

sda8: __________________________________________________ ________________________

File system: ntfs
Boot sector type: Windows Vista/7
Boot sector info: According to the info in the boot sector, sda8 starts
at sector 2048.
Operating System:
Boot files:

============================ Drive/Partition Info: =============================

Drive: sda __________________________________________________ ___________________

Disk /dev/sda: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders, total 488397168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

Partition Boot Start Sector End Sector # of Sectors Id System

/dev/sda1 * 2,048 206,847 204,800 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS
/dev/sda2 206,848 102,591,089 102,384,242 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS
/dev/sda3 78,043,770 488,392,064 410,348,295 f W95 Extended (LBA)
/dev/sda5 102,594,560 178,268,934 75,674,375 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS
/dev/sda6 178,270,208 198,748,159 20,477,952 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS
/dev/sda7 198,750,208 324,284,415 125,534,208 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS
/dev/sda8 324,286,464 488,392,064 164,105,601 7 NTFS / exFAT / HPFS

/dev/sda2 overlaps with /dev/sda3

"blkid" output: __________________________________________________ ______________

Device UUID TYPE LABEL

/dev/loop0 squashfs
/dev/sda1 90F82BB7F82B9B0C ntfs System Reserved
/dev/sda2 0C9E70E49E70C7AA ntfs SYSTEM
/dev/sda5 02C47CEFC47CE677 ntfs ENTERTAINMENT
/dev/sda6 4ECA12C2CA12A66D ntfs DATA
/dev/sda7 5EFC2D38FC2D0C39 ntfs HOBI
/dev/sda8 1C88A08E88A0684A ntfs SOFTWARE

================================ Mount points: =================================

Device Mount_Point Type Options

/dev/loop0 /rofs squashfs (ro,noatime)
/dev/sr0 /cdrom iso9660 (ro,noatime)I've highlighted the problem in red. This is serious, and reflects an error in the partition table which needs editing. This is why the Ubuntu installer cannot see any operating system. Normally, I would suggest one of a couple of ways to correct this, but in a situation like this where the beginning of an extended partition is overlapping the end of a primary partition, it is difficult to decide whether to "move" the extended or primary partition. Is the end sector figure of sda2 wrong, or the start sector of sda3? My guess is the start sector of sda3 is the wrong one, but I'm not sure and I would like to see a more expert opinion.

Don't do anything just yet. I will pm an expert who will be able to better advise.

EDIT: I forgot to ask. Did the machine come with Windows pre-installed or did you install Windows yourself? And if the latter, did you use a 3rd party partitioning tool, and if so which one? Something has made a mess of your partition table and it would be useful to know what this was so that it can be avoided.

abre
May 28th, 2011, 04:49 PM
i installed windows by myself. to make more space in drive C (to be 50 gb) i used minitool partition wizard profesional edition 6.0

srs5694
May 28th, 2011, 05:00 PM
It's almost certainly the extended partition that's malformed. /dev/sda2 ends shortly before /dev/sda5 begins, so it seems unlikely to me that /dev/sda2 is too big for the filesystem it contains (although that's a possibility). Even if that's the case, it's safe to fix it by adjusting the extended partition. The easiest way to do this is with my FixParts (http://www.rodsbooks.com/fixparts/) program. Its Web page describes its use. Be sure to check that it's correctly detected all your partitions with "p" (except for the extended partition, which the program discards and then re-writes). Note that there's a version of FixParts for Windows, so you can run it from Windows before installing Ubuntu.

It's extremely important that this problem be corrected immediately. The way the partition table is written now, there's a danger that a write to /dev/sda2 could overwrite the start of the extended partition, which would cause you to lose all your logical partitions. This risk is low on a per-write basis, but the longer you use the disk, the more likely it is that damage will occur.

After you fix the problem, I recommend running Windows CHKDSK on /dev/sda2. There's a chance that whatever tool caused this problem ended up damaging that partition's contents. CHKDSK will detect any structural problems, but it won't detect damage to a file (which is more likely). It's unlikely that more than one file was damaged.

abre
May 29th, 2011, 04:53 AM
hi srs5694, if i use fixpart to solve my problem, i worry that it can damage my system (sda2 in C drive). If it is happen, can i install windows on that? or the C drive will damage forever, so i cant use it anymore

abre
May 29th, 2011, 10:05 AM
anibody home???? please someone help me???

coffeecat
May 29th, 2011, 10:32 AM
hi srs5694, if i use fixpart to solve my problem, i worry that it can damage my system (sda2 in C drive). If it is happen, can i install windows on that? or the C drive will damage forever, so i cant use it anymore


anibody home???? please someone help me???

@abre, srs5694 is in a different time-zone - from me at least - so isn't likely to respond for some time. I'll answer your query as best I can in the meantime.

All that fixparts does is to rewrite the partition table which, in an mbr scheme, is in the first sector of the hard drive, in bytes 446 to 511 (counting from zero). Therefore it doesn't touch your sda2/C: partition, and in no way could it "damage" it forever. However, rewriting a partition table is a fundamental task. Which is why you should backup everything you can before doing anything that affects partitions. That being said, many people on this forum (myself included) have used fixparts and found it to be reliable and effective.

When you say "damage forever", you need to distinguish between damaging the filesystem in the partition and physically damaging the hard drive. Software like fixparts cannot damage the hard drive. And I can't see how fixparts could ever damage the sda2 filesystem, but it would be best if srs5694 commented on that.

So - if the worst came to the worst, you could indeed reinstall Windows to sda2, but you still need to repair the partition table inconsistency first. Both srs5694 and I have stated, in different ways, that this is a serious issue and needs to be fixed. It doesn't matter whether you install Ubuntu or not - this is still a matter needing attention.

Good luck with that. Read srs5694's link carefully. If you have any questions, just post back.

abre
May 29th, 2011, 12:45 PM
i have download fixpart from http://sourceforge.net/projects/gptfdisk/files/gptfdisk/0.7.1/. i placed all files after extracted in C:/users/download. after click twice on gdisk.exe, i have attention like this:

GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 0.7.1
most version of windows cannot boot from a GPT disk, and most varieties prior to Vista cannot read GPT disks. Therefore, you should exit now unless you understand the implications of converting MBR to GPT, editing an existing GPT, or creating a new GPT disk layout!
are you sure you want to continue? (Y/N) :
What i must to do, can you give me details what i must to do, step by step? thanks

srs5694
May 29th, 2011, 03:03 PM
i have download fixpart from http://sourceforge.net/projects/gptfdisk/files/gptfdisk/0.7.1/. i placed all files after extracted in C:/users/download. after click twice on gdisk.exe, i have attention like this:

You did not download FixParts; you downloaded GPT fdisk (gdisk), a related but different program. Download FixParts from here:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/gptfdisk/files/gptfdisk/0.7.1/fixparts-binaries/

As to your earlier questions, coffeecat's response was basically correct. FixParts should not write to within any of your primary or logical partitions, and so should not damage their contents. There is a caveat, though: Any program can contain bugs. I don't know of any in FixParts that would cause data loss, but I'd be a fool if I claimed that I know for a fact that such a bug does not exist.

That said, given the nature of the problem with your partition table, I'd say the risk of continuing to use those partitions (/dev/sda2 in particular) is far greater than the risk of running FixParts, even without backing up your data. As I wrote before, an unlucky write to /dev/sda2 could cause all your logical partitions to disappear.

Also, one expansion on something coffeecat wrote: The first sector of the hard disk does hold the primary partition table, as coffeecat said; however, logical partitions are defined in sectors scattered about the disk, with each partition's definition pointing to the next one in the chain. That's why your current setup is so dangerous; the definition for /dev/sda5 lies inside the space reserved for /dev/sda2, so writing in the wrong sectors of /dev/sda2 will render /dev/sda5 inaccessible; and if this happens, all the logical partitions after /dev/sda5 will also disappear. The point, though, is that FixParts (or any program that modifies logical partitions) must write to the sectors that define the logical partitions, so FixParts does modify more than just sector 0.

abre
May 29th, 2011, 03:41 PM
hi srs5694, i'm so sorry my english is not good enough so i dont understand much about fixparts tutorial. after i lauch fixparts with administrator previlage, there is command prompt that said type device filename, or press enter to exit. what i must write on to solve my problem. what the meaning of # fixparts /dev/sdc as in fixparts tutorial? thanks

Quackers
May 29th, 2011, 04:22 PM
That is an example.
Are you running fixparts from within Windows, from within Ubuntu or from Ubuntu live cd desktop?

abre
May 29th, 2011, 05:29 PM
within windows in c drive

srs5694
May 29th, 2011, 05:45 PM
If you run FixParts in Windows, the device filename is "0:". You would open an Administrator command prompt window and type:



fixparts 0:


You must run the program as Administrator.

Once the program is running, do this:



FixParts 0.7.1

Loading MBR data from /dev/sdc

MBR command (? for help): p

** NOTE: Partition numbers do NOT indicate final primary/logical status,
** unlike in most MBR partitioning tools!

** Extended partitions are not displayed, but will be generated as required.

Disk size is 15654912 sectors (7.5 GiB)
MBR disk identifier: 0x000721DC
MBR partitions:

Can Be Can Be
Number Boot Start Sector End Sector Status Logical Primary Code
1 62 6125599 primary Y Y 0x83
5 6125662 15650907 logical Y Y 0x83

MBR command (? for help): w

Final checks complete. About to write MBR data. THIS WILL OVERWRITE EXISTING
PARTITIONS!!

Do you want to proceed? (Y/N): y
Done writing data!


I've put what you type in bold. The "p" command displays the partition table. In this example, I've got two partitions, one primary and one logical. (FixParts does not display extended partitions.) Your display will obviously be different, but you should use "p" to verify that all your partitions are present and marked as either "primary" or "logical" (not "omitted") in the "Status" column. If everything looks OK, type "w" to save your changes. If you see anything suspicious, type "q" to quit without saving and post the output here for advice.

abre
May 29th, 2011, 05:58 PM
i'm sorry i still confused. after i run fixparts with run as administrator and show up command prompt, i must write fixparts 0:, after write that words what i must to do, if i press enter, the comand prompt is disappeared.

srs5694
May 29th, 2011, 11:05 PM
You run a command prompt as Administrator, and type "fixparts 0:" in the command prompt window. Alternatively, you could run fixparts directly as Administrator and enter "0:" when it asks you what device to use.

abre
May 30th, 2011, 03:45 PM
ok srs5694, i have run all and everything be ok again. i can install ubuntu with dual boot. thanks man, you are good. hedhog1, coffecat and you srs 5694 and others thank you.