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Chewey56
May 12th, 2011, 09:28 PM
Hey everyone!

I am planning on starting to teach myself how to program this summer, but i do not know where to start due to the vast number of languages available. I started on python, but the dynamic nature of the language didn't seem to click with me. which do you guys think is the best static programming language to start with?

IWantFroyo
May 12th, 2011, 09:32 PM
Try Java. There are some good books and guides out there.
It's pretty user-friendly, and after you learn that you'll be able to delve into the Android realm as well.

cgroza
May 12th, 2011, 09:36 PM
I learned C++ as a second language. It taught me a lot.

zealibib slaughter
May 12th, 2011, 09:42 PM
I started with c++ but if I had to do it again I would go with Python or Java to begin with.

simeon87
May 12th, 2011, 09:45 PM
In that case, I'd recommend to go for C or Java. Otherwise I'd say Python. If you wish to start with functional programming, go for Haskell.

elguapo159
May 12th, 2011, 10:23 PM
I would go for c or c++. Lots of good guides out there. You can do nice things with both of them.

sanderd17
May 12th, 2011, 11:16 PM
The most important is that you follow the philosophy of the language. In Java or C++, everything is an object with attributes en methods, in Haskell, everything is a function, in Prolog, everything is a logical formula with variables, in C, everything is a method ...

Don't try to push your own programming style to the language, but learn the programming style for which the language is created. If you are not able to adapt yourself, use another language.

I tried C++ first, but that was too difficult. Java worked for me. The big difference is that Java has a lot more build-in and well-documented packages.

Wesley The First
May 13th, 2011, 02:26 AM
Learn Python because it is basically the monkey wrench of the programming world. In other words it can be used for everything and can be done quickly to.

Chewey56
May 13th, 2011, 02:29 AM
I would start with java, but i will be taking AP computer Science at my school next year and i am supposed to be learning java then, and then the next year i will be taking honors java. with that said, do you still think i should learn java over the summer?

simeon87
May 13th, 2011, 09:12 AM
I would start with java, but i will be taking AP computer Science at my school next year and i am supposed to be learning java then, and then the next year i will be taking honors java. with that said, do you still think i should learn java over the summer?

It certainly doesn't hurt to have a head start. This gives you more time to learn Java and to practise writing code in Java. In particular when you're new to programming it's good to practise it as often as you can.

My experience is that those with prior programming experience always benefit in a programming course at school. The teacher can tell you everything about Java but that doesn't mean you know how to write a program when asked. That's something you need to practise.

r-senior
May 13th, 2011, 10:34 AM
Why make a decision? Learning C or Python won't stop you learning Java and you can guarantee that over the course of your career you'll have to switch around or learn something new.

Have a play with as many as you can, and try some less obvious languages: Haskell has been mentioned, Objective-C (iPhone/iPad) compiles with gcc, Prolog is fun. And don't neglect shell programming (e.g. bash) which always comes in handy. If you are running GNU/Linux, you have the tools and there are plenty of tutorials around. This forum is a willing helper if you are stuck.

If you have a mathematical mind, Project Euler provides small-ish (becoming really difficult) problems that you can play around with. When (if) you solve a problem you get to compare other people's solutions - typically in C, Java, Python, J and others.

CoffeeRain
May 13th, 2011, 02:58 PM
It depends on what you want to do. If you want to know the basics of programming, Bash is a good place to start, because it interacts with your computer more. (listing directories, editing files, etc.) I would say python next, because that can be very useful when working with data, and it can do many cool things.

stchman
May 13th, 2011, 09:00 PM
Hey everyone!

I am planning on starting to teach myself how to program this summer, but i do not know where to start due to the vast number of languages available. I started on python, but the dynamic nature of the language didn't seem to click with me. which do you guys think is the best static programming language to start with?

If you ask 20 people, you might get 20 different answers.

IMO, Java is a great language to start out with. It is a strongly typed language and teaches good programming habits.

Looking at your avatar, it appears that you are a Python person.

Chewey56
May 14th, 2011, 04:47 AM
^yes, i started learning a bit of python but grew bored, might go back to that later. i think i'll go with java because i like the idea of development in the Android Market (which i know will take some time learning before i can actually make apps)

Telengard C64
May 14th, 2011, 05:13 AM
IMO, Java is a great language to start out with. It is a strongly typed language and teaches good programming habits.

I agree. I do think though that learning C first will give you more appreciation for what makes Java such a great language.

stchman
May 17th, 2011, 12:16 AM
I agree. I do think though that learning C first will give you more appreciation for what makes Java such a great language.

I learned C before I learned Java. Yes I do agree. Java keeps you on the straight and narrow.

jamesjenner
May 17th, 2011, 12:22 AM
^yes, i started learning a bit of python but grew bored, might go back to that later. i think i'll go with java because i like the idea of development in the Android Market (which i know will take some time learning before i can actually make apps)

Sounds like a sensible approach. Also as others have mentioned, getting a head start on something that you will be studying and then doing honors in will assist you greatly. You will have a leg up on the others and will shine, which cannot be a bad thing.

If you have any questions just holler :)

Cheers,

James.

Chewey56
May 17th, 2011, 01:53 AM
^Thank you!

I reserved Head First Java and am now waiting for that, which may take awhile. so, in the meantime, i'm going to start some web page designing. For the recent addition of HTML5 into the mix, what is it exactly? i know that its a revision of the current HTML, but if i were to want to learn it, would i learn HTML and then HTML5?