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View Full Version : [ubuntu] What defines a distro 'version'?



jhonan
May 5th, 2011, 10:39 AM
As I understand it, a distro release consists of some version of the linux kernel, related gcc and glibc, the desktop environment, various libraries (gtk/qt etc.) and packaged apps.

If I'm running Ubuntu v10.04, and carefully install and build the newest linux kernel using the latest gcc/glibc release, newer GTK libraries, and upgrade the apps to the latest version, when does it stop being v10.04 and I can actually call it v11.04?

What defines the 'version' of a distro? The kernel version? The kernel+gcc combination, or something else?

vandamme
May 7th, 2011, 03:33 AM
Same thing "New and Improved!!" means: whatevre you want it to mean.

Package Debian with a background of your smiling face and a couple apps, call it "Version 23" and write an article on Wikipedia.