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meTroubled
April 14th, 2011, 12:41 AM
i' currently using windows vista as my main OS and ubuntu as the other........
i'm having no problem at all with my current OS but still there is a voice inside of me that keeps saying to switch to linux.........:rolleyes::rolleyes:
please tell me major advantages and disadvantages of switching completely to linux in detail......


also i love KDE so please guide me that should i use Kubuntu or install KDE on Ubuntu only.......

youbuntu
April 14th, 2011, 12:44 AM
i' currently using windows vista as my main OS and ubuntu as the other........
i'm having no problem at all with my current OS but still there is a voice inside of me that keeps saying to switch to linux.........:rolleyes::rolleyes:
please tell me major advantages and disadvantages of switching completely to linux in detail......


also i love KDE so please guide me that should i use Kubuntu or install KDE on Ubuntu only.......

If you need convincing, take a look around a little. Ultimately, the decision rests with you alone, as none of us are here to convince you, as that would be pushing you into it.

What do you use your PC/Mac for? What do you require of it?...

FWIW, I'm in a far later stage of the situation you're in - I'm too lazy right now, to sort/trash/backup/remove my Win7 side :lol: but I can do without it, and I do! It took me 3 years to finally, last Sunday, sift through/delete/edit/sort/merge my Gmail contacts :P

Enigmapond
April 14th, 2011, 12:46 AM
Would you rather pay to get a cup of coffee or have a FREE one that is probably better? That does it for me. Money for everything vs. Free... pretty simple. As far as KDE...I'm not and never have been a fan so I can't advise..

Namaste.. :)

bodhi.zazen
April 14th, 2011, 12:51 AM
Thread moved to Recurring Discussions.

You should use any OS as it is the best tool for the task at hand.

You will get a range of opinions regarding Windows vs Linux (vs BSD vs ...) and thus I moved this to recurring discussions.

Although the beer may be free, you should tip the bartender.

If you use open source you should contribute back where you can. This can range from assisting with support / debugging / coding / documentation of the applications you use or financial support to any of the various projects / distors.

Not everyone can afford the time or money to give back, but when you can please give back to the community.

youbuntu
April 14th, 2011, 12:51 AM
Would you rather pay to get a cup of coffee or have a FREE one that is probably better? That does it for me. Money for everything vs. Free... pretty simple. As far as KDE...I'm not and never have been a fan so I can't advise..

Namaste.. :)

I'm not sure if that is robust enough a convincer... but a useful side effect. For example, I could have free coffee from a complimentary vending machine at an office, or go home and grind my own (paid for) beans - see?

[EDIT]

As bohi.zazen says, just because something is free (beer) to you, don't assume it has been free (beer) all the way down the line. Somewhere down the line, time has been spent developing these incredible tools, and money (often millions!) may have been spent, for a certain tool to be improved or conceived to do a certain job. The convenient side effect is that the tool is then shared.

Imagine I need to pick some apples but I don't have a basket to hold them. You, conicidentally, need a basket to put some flowers in for your relative's Birthday, but don't have the time to go and buy one. I go and buy a basket to help me pick those apples, but when I've finished, I no longer need the basket, so I give it to you to use for the flowers. You'd then want to help me out, because I've been kind to you.

I am not sure if that analogy makes sense?

shadramon
April 14th, 2011, 12:58 AM
will am a new user my self
Linux in general is so freaking stable that it scares me and i say go for it. if you have any difficulties in using it the guys here won't hesitate to help you trust me in that ;)

i have to say tho that the only frustration to me was the fact that i wont be able to use adobe photoshop here lol

uRock
April 14th, 2011, 01:05 AM
Would you rather pay to get a cup of coffee or have a FREE one that is probably better? That does it for me. Money for everything vs. Free... pretty simple. As far as KDE...I'm not and never have been a fan so I can't advise..

Namaste.. :)

I agree. Having programs available just by opening the Ubuntu Software Center, finding what ya want and installing it without having to search the interweb and risk installing a security vulnerability is a great bonus.

youbuntu
April 14th, 2011, 01:06 AM
will am a new user my self
Linux in general is so freaking stable that it scares me and i say go for it. if you have any difficulties in using it the guys here won't hesitate to help you trust me in that ;)

i have to say tho that the only frustration to me was the fact that i wont be able to use adobe photoshop here lol

I am not going to encourage you to use Photoshop, when GIMP works very well, but I am not so blind as to not see that you may NEED to use it for something, in which case "Wine" (Wine is not an Emulator) could help you use it... or you could use it inside a virtual machine, running XP/Whatever.

[EDIT]


I agree. Having programs available just by opening the Ubuntu Software Center, finding what ya want and installing it without having to search the interweb and risk installing a security vulnerability is a great bonus.

I'm not sure that the coffee analogy makes sense - it seems back to front to think that a free coffee would taste better than a paid for, premium or home made, home ground one. It's possibly, but unlikely, unless you mean free from a friend.

Anyhow, sorry for going off topic :P

MSPdwalt
April 14th, 2011, 01:25 AM
If you're serious about switching to Ubuntu, the first thing you need to do is analyze how you use your computer, for example your essential apps.

Once you've done that it becomes about equivalents and alternatives. You need to figure out what you use that's cross platform and what isn't. Out of the list of what isn't you'll need to figure out what linux program is going to replace it for you. The forums are a great place for that, so is google.

Depending on your needs there may be a degree of determination required as well. I left windows by choice and was bound and determined to do so. It took me about a month to become equally as functional in Ubuntu as I was in Windows, but now a year later I wouldn't go back at gunpoint. I still have a couple of windows only apps I run in a VM on my work computer and it's handy to have IE on the occasion I need it. *cough* netflix *cough* I game via Wine.

Linux is nice because it's highly customizable, you really settle into it.
It's efficient and stable...once you have something working it rarely breaks...it may take awhile to get working though depending on what you're doing.

Ubuntu always allows you to upgrade to the latest release over the internet, if all goes well you may only have to format/install once. Linux doesn't seem to slowly rot like windows does.

The possibilities are endless...Linux takes the old saying "There's more than one way to skin a cat." to a new extreme.

Gnome vs. KDE vs. unity vs. XDE why not try em all?

d3v1150m471c
April 14th, 2011, 01:35 AM
You won't have to defragment. I've had ubuntu installed on this machine for years now and it has .5% fragmentation on the disk. The filing system uses permissions by default, thus tighter security. Root is disabled on ubuntu by default and major system changes require a password. Thousands of packages you can install for free with a few keystrokes. A much more configurable desktop environment, actually a much more configurable system and open source for the most part. Ubuntu specifically has an amazing forum community for troubleshooting, or just anything computing in general. Your operating system will be completely free as opposed to paying for an OS imo that offers less as a base product. Speaking of that, upgrading is free, too.

Edit: This is sorta trivial but yesterday I accidentally email mark shuttleworth instead of the build daemon maintainers @ launchpad about the build daemon and the guy actually responded, and in less than a 48 period i might add. Good luck getting personal responses from Bill Gates or Steve Jobs lol.

Enigmapond
April 14th, 2011, 01:40 AM
Edit: This is sorta trivial but yesterday I accidentally email mark shuttleworth instead of the build daemon maintainers @ launchpad about the build daemon and the guy actually responded, and in less than a 48 period i might add. Good luck getting personal responses from Bill Gates or Steve Jobs lol.

That's so cool! Gotta love this community!:D

youbuntu
April 14th, 2011, 01:49 AM
I agree. Having programs available just by opening the Ubuntu Software Center, finding what ya want and installing it without having to search the interweb and risk installing a security vulnerability is a great bonus.


That's so cool! Gotta love this community!:D

Possibly because Mark Shuttleworth is nowhere NEAR as well known and has slightly fewer press/engineering/design/whatever meetings to go to, no? Steve Jobs is massively - MASSIVELY involved in a company which are continually designing many, many products, software ideas & services, upon which rest hundreds of millions of users, and BILLIONS of <insert currency> of revenue. Same goes for Microsoft, minus the hardware (except Zune, Phone 7 etc). Hardly a comparison.

Sorry, but that's the likely truth, although yeah - it IS good he replied!

Thund3rstruck
April 14th, 2011, 02:55 AM
You don't have to (and shouldn't) have to choose between the two Operating Systems. You should enjoy both of them.

I absolutely love Linux Mint but I also absolutely love Windows 7. In Windows 7 I have a machine that can play all the latest games and has exceptional developer tools and in Linux I have a system that I can completely customize and hack at.

It's not an either-or situation. You shouldn't feel any shame for running Windows since what windows does it does really well and vice versa for Linux.

ImDougy
April 14th, 2011, 02:58 AM
you can take a look at this

http://polishlinux.org/why-linux/

BertN45
April 14th, 2011, 03:16 AM
There is only one real advantage for normal people and that is money. You do not have to pay for Windows 7 or Windows 8 and for the coming years you do not have to buy more expensive hardware.

For the nerds there is a lot of free fun. Currently I try to boot my old disk-less P-III laptop from my main desktop using LTSP. I also could have bought a disk for a few bucks, but that is too easy. In the windows world I would need an expensive terminal server.

Copper Bezel
April 14th, 2011, 05:06 AM
Well, Windows normally comes bundled with the hardware, anyway.

But it's nice not to have to ever have to use trial-edition applications. = )

BertN45
April 14th, 2011, 08:45 PM
Well, Windows normally comes bundled with the hardware


You even pay for it, if you do not want to use it. You think that is fair competition?

1clue
April 14th, 2011, 09:06 PM
IMO every comment about cheaper is irrelevant. You always pay in some fashion, and while no Open Source project makes a huge deal of it, the premise is that sooner or later you contribute back to the community in some significant way, which "pays for" your right to use the OS software.

There are exactly two reasons I can think of to switch:

You want to.
You have no choice.


Everything else comes down to semantics.

First, go try running it from the CD and try a few things. Then maybe set up a VMware session on your Windows box, and actually use it for a month. If you like Linux better or at least well enough to know it will work for you, then make the switch.

el_koraco
April 14th, 2011, 09:06 PM
If you have to ask, then no.

juancarlospaco
April 14th, 2011, 09:26 PM
Because you can

Copper Bezel
April 14th, 2011, 11:43 PM
1clue nailed it.


You even pay for it, if you do not want to use it. You think that is fair competition?

I was responding to your post, which was about money, not the principle. Linux isn't going to save a user money, for exactly the reason you just stated, unless the user somehow ended up with a borked Windows install that can't be restored (which is, incidentally, how I first got into Ubuntu.)

You buntu
April 15th, 2011, 02:00 AM
I think having Ubuntu on my PC is bloody awesome!

BertN45
April 15th, 2011, 04:26 AM
1clue nailed it.
I was responding to your post, which was about money, not the principle. Linux isn't going to save a user money, for exactly the reason you just stated.

In the current situation you are right unfortunately.

But I have a little hope about the price argument, since 3 years ago I bought a Dell Laptop that came with Vista. After I did run it for some time, I started using the Beta of Windows 7 (liked it) and decided that that Vista was definitely out. Even now (SP2) if you boot it, it needs 600mb of memory and the initial page file size is 800mb. Then at the end of the Beta, I had to make a decision to pay another $200 for the improved version (Ultimate) of the same botched OS or switch to Ubuntu. I knew Ubuntu, because I had a dual boot with Vista for fun. I decided to save the money and I switched completely to a well designed OS like Linux (250mb after boot and zero swap size and it boots four times as fast as well).

So at the end I have decided based on:


Money, maybe because I'm Dutch :)
Core Quality
Paying an ridiculous price to a monopolist for something that should have been offered as a service pack out of shame over Vista.

Note that I was perfectly happy with the NT range of OSes, they were good. I still use XP as the OS for my file server. I am not against all MS products, I only don't like the MS behavior and the way they compete or more precisely avoid to compete.

1clue
April 15th, 2011, 04:19 PM
It's entirely about your perceptions and your need.

If you "get to" have extreme control over which software your system uses, down to which logging implementation or whatever, then some Linux distro may be right up your alley.

If on the other hand you "have to" mess with a whole bunch of stuff that no self-respecting IT guy should have to mess with, then you might want to stick with Windows.

I fall into the former category. I waffle between Ubuntu and Gentoo. Gentoo because I have absolute control over how every piece of software on the system got there, down to which compile options were used. Ubuntu because on some machines you simply need it to work and be solid underneath, with minor headaches for maintenance.

Personally I can't stand the one-size-fits-none of Windows, and I have Really Not Liked Micro$oft's business plan since I actually looked at it in the 80's.

On the other hand, I have friends who fall solidly in the "have to" camp and could not possibly use anything but Windows. I have other friends who are dyed-in-the-wool Mac guys. Each sees a significant value for their platform that the others just can't satisfy. And for them, they are right.

Regarding cost, if you consider your time to be worth money, especially if you intend to make a living with your system, then Linux does not save you money. A Windows system comes already installed and mostly configured, most of the time you can just take it out of the box, plug it in and it works.

A Linux system nearly always has to be installed. Even if it came with Linux on it already (I've bought one of these) I decided I didn't like what they did and had to reinstall anyway. I think most hardcore Linux guys will reinstall not once but maybe 3 or 4 times before being happy with any new system. It's the nature of the people who prefer Linux I think. It's certainly my nature. So the sheer number of hours spent installing and tweaking and fiddling will more than pay the price of an operating system even if you "pay yourself" minimum wage to get it working on your own home system.

BertN45
April 20th, 2011, 12:17 AM
I have been busy, installing beta 2 on my machines and on 2 machines of 2 new Xubuntu users.

The out of the box experience is getting better with every release. Often, like with the two new machines, you install it and it works.
Tuning and doing special things is just for fun, but in most cases not really needed. On one of the five machines I had a driver problem (my Dell), but switching from the Broadcom driver to the Open Source version solved the problem. The same type of problems I remember from my windows days.