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youbuntu
April 7th, 2011, 06:07 PM
Do you ever feel as if you're the permanently on-call family tech support agent? Do you have your family ask you the same BASIC questions about the simplest of tasks again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again?

No? Well you are blessed then. My Mother asks me around 2 times a month how to do the same things in Gmail... "how do I attach a photo/.doc/pdf to Gmail", and the SIMPLE advice never seems to persist in her memory... she just asks me again, next time... and again, and again... ARGHH!

I am venting here, but also asking if I am the only one? Friends do it too - my friend asked me how to attach photos in Outlook around thirty times now... and am sick of repeating myself!

I think that if people know they have a friend/relative who (they assume) will keep showing them the way, then they get lazy and just lean on the fact that (they hope) you'll tell them (again) how do do the task which you told them how to execute, 100 times before.

I ask you, if all these people know how to get online, then why don't they realise... that is what GOOGLE is for - finding out.

:lol:

</frustrated vent>

undecim
April 7th, 2011, 06:11 PM
Say "Google it" and walk away.

sydbat
April 7th, 2011, 06:13 PM
Yup. I can forgive my 84 year old dad and 81 year old father-in-law, but others...nope. I started charging them my going rate - $30/ hour. I get very few annoying calls now.

youbuntu
April 7th, 2011, 06:14 PM
Say "Google it" and walk away.

That's exactly what I do, but I get rants of frustration. Suffice it so say, I have pointed out that this is how I & most geeks have had to learn - using our noggins and discovering the advice for ourselves, as people are busy with their own lives, and don't have the patience to reiterate the SAME advice, 50 times!

Keep hand-holding, and people become dependant on you as a fount of all knowledge.



Yup. I can forgive my 84 year old dad and 81 year old father-in-law, but others...nope. I started charging them my going rate - $30/ hour. I get very few annoying calls now.

Nope, my Mum is nowhere near that old...

lisati
April 7th, 2011, 06:17 PM
You are not alone.

I recall a conversation with a brother in law some years ago now. Somehow the topic of MS Windows came up, and he who started using Windows long before I did asked me, half seriously, "What's Windows?" Unfortunately I had yet to discover this forum, so I hadn't had the influences that would allow me to come up with a witty rejoinder in the "something to look out of" tradition.

howefield
April 7th, 2011, 06:26 PM
I'd question the teacher. ;-)

Spice Weasel
April 7th, 2011, 06:30 PM
My Mum has been using computers for 40 years. She studied CS and knew how to program. Now I have to show her how to attach a word document to an email and send it.

aG93IGRvIGkgdWJ1bnR1Pw==
April 7th, 2011, 06:35 PM
It's simple. I didn't get a doctorate in CS to perform free tech support for people who are afraid of learning. As a matter of fact, after wasting 8 summers on crappy tech support jobs to pay for my scholarship, I'd very much prefer to never do tech support again.

KiwiNZ
April 7th, 2011, 06:57 PM
Helping the person who was there when I threw up when I was sick
Helping the person that got up at 2am when I was having a nightmare and still smiled
Helping the person who always comforted me when I fell off my bike
Helping the person who still nursed me through teenaged hangovers
Helping the person who was on call for help when I didn't have a clue with our new born babies, no matter what time.
The list is long but the picture is clear.

Gee, helping with a bit a tech support just doesn't stack up really.

youbuntu
April 7th, 2011, 07:08 PM
Helping the person who was there when I threw up when I was sick
Helping the person that got up at 2am when I was having a nightmare and still smiled
Helping the person who always comforted me when I fell off my bike
Helping the person who still nursed me through teenaged hangovers
Helping the person who was on call for help when I didn't have a clue with our new born babies, no matter what time.
The list is long but the picture is clear.

Gee, helping with a bit a tech support just doesn't stack up really.

You are indeed right, but also missing the point, through a guilt trip which doesn't negate the need for people to learn for themselves. Also, your argument is a little flawed, as, who ELSE was going to take the responsibilities that a parent HAS to take on board? Children don't ask to be born, although I do see what angle you're taking on this. No comparison really, sorry.

Nice try :)

Zimmer
April 7th, 2011, 07:09 PM
Frustration at what you see as simple.... it is probably only simple because you have performed those tasks many times at work /school day in day out. The casual user is often 'frightened' of breaking the machine (seriously!) and is not fluent in the language used in the Help files (compu-speak) so, yes, it is easier to ask a friend.

Be a friend.... (or get an answerphone :) )

wojox
April 7th, 2011, 07:12 PM
driving me insane!! :(

Don't worry glossy, at the speed your going it will be a short trip. :P

youbuntu
April 7th, 2011, 07:13 PM
Frustration at what you see as simple.... it is probably only simple because you have performed those tasks many times at work /school day in day out. The casual user is often 'frightened' of breaking the machine (seriously!) and is not fluent in the language used in the Help files (compu-speak) so, yes, it is easier to ask a friend.

Be a friend.... (or get an answerphone :) )

I don't mind friends - they hardly ask me AT ALL. If you read the thread title, it says "family", not friends. I agree with what you have said.

KiwiNZ
April 7th, 2011, 07:14 PM
You are indeed right, but also missing the point, through a guilt trip which doesn't negate the need for people to learn for themselves. Also, your argument is a little flawed, as, who ELSE was going to take the responsibilities that a parent HAS to take on board? Children don't ask to be born, although I do see what angle you're taking on this. No comparison really, sorry.

My oldest son is a Doctor , should he expect me to know medicine?

What I am saying, well in my circle, friends and family help each other, it is sort of what friends and family is all about.

KiwiNZ
April 7th, 2011, 07:18 PM
I don't mind friends - they hardly ask me AT ALL. If you read the thread title, it says "family", not friends. I agree with what you have said.

I am not using a guilt trip, if you feel guilt it is self induced. Want it to go away? heal thy self.

youbuntu
April 7th, 2011, 07:22 PM
My oldest son is a Doctor , should he expect me to know medicine?

What I am saying, well in my circle, friends and family help each other, it is sort of what friends and family is all about.

http://octoberdaniels.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/i-see-what-you-did-there-cat.jpg

So you are suggesting I continue hand-holding my family, babysitting their computing, so that they'll become (more) dependant on me, ergo unable to send attachments, when I move away?

I don't get your logic. I understand what being a good person means, actually, because I am a very good person (I am constantly told how kind, generous and patient I am). Maybe you just see me in a negative light - that's your perogative, just don't expect me to agree with you. I still respect you, I just hope you can have the good grace to reciprocate it, please? :)

KiwiNZ
April 7th, 2011, 07:28 PM
http://octoberdaniels.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/i-see-what-you-did-there-cat.jpg

So you are suggesting I continue hand-holding my family, babysitting their computing, so that they'll become (more) dependant on me, ergo unable to send attachments, when I move away?

I don't get your logic. I understand what being a good person means, actually. :)

Do what you will, but remember "what goes around , comes around".

Tristam Green
April 7th, 2011, 07:31 PM
you could always cold-turkey it, if you feel so strongly.

just don't expect many home-cooked meals thereafter.

KiwiNZ
April 7th, 2011, 07:31 PM
Good deeds are paid back, I can attest to that, they were for me with interest.

LowSky
April 7th, 2011, 07:33 PM
Sometimes you just have to say no and walk away.

They will get mad, but they will also learn.

KiwiNZ
April 7th, 2011, 07:39 PM
Sometimes you just have to say no and walk away.

They will get mad, but they will also learn.

Is it really something worth the risk of breaking family and friendship ties?

WinterMadness
April 7th, 2011, 07:41 PM
I used to be that guy but then I tell them computer science has nothing to do with fixing computers.

Most people in my family think if you goto college for anything computer related, youre going to fix computers.

As if the world were really that simple...

uRock
April 7th, 2011, 07:41 PM
I find it amazing that some people think everyone should learn everything about the IT profession. When family asks me to do their brakes, I may complain about getting my hands dirty, but I'd never expect them to learn how to do it.

When my people ask for help I give it. When I need help, they are there for me.

KiwiNZ
April 7th, 2011, 07:50 PM
I find it amazing that some people think everyone should learn everything about the IT profession. When family asks me to do their brakes, I may complain about getting my hands dirty, but I'd never expect them to learn how to do it.

When my people ask for help I give it. When I need help, they are there for me.

My Father owned a chain of Automobile Repair shops yet in the weekend he would have friends cars at home to fix or would be at families home to fix their cars. He was always repairing my first cars as with my brothers and sisters. I never heard him grumble about it.

I also suspect many of the weekend cars were "customers" that could not afford to get their cars fixed so he was doing it as a freebie for them.

flemur13013
April 7th, 2011, 07:52 PM
Say "Google it" and walk away.

Could you show me how to "google" something? :)

1clue
April 7th, 2011, 07:56 PM
I don't get your logic. I understand what being a good person means, actually, because I am a very good person (I am constantly told how kind, generous and patient I am).

<humor>
I see a lot of that right here on this forum!
</humor>

Seriously though, why not train them how to figure it all out? That's what my parents did all those decades ago, after all.

I totally agree that there is no way we can ever expect to repay our parents, except in raising our own children as best we can. That doesn't mean I don't bend over backwards if they need help.

My parents are in their 70s and when they had a computer I was definitely on call, from about 1100 miles away. Likewise I've given advice to many members of my extended family.

I find myself somewhat in the middle between KiwiNZ and undecim. I will jump to help my parents in pretty much anything, because they ask so seldom. On the other hand, a young, intelligent, pestiferous cousin or niece or nephew sometimes gets the "google it" response, after having repeated myself a few times.

There's a point where continually helping someone who should be able to pick it up no problem is no longer helping. They should be learning, and by now should know how to learn.

uRock
April 7th, 2011, 07:57 PM
Could you show me how to "google" something? :)
Just don't Google "Google" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdjRwpYM-Kw) or you'll break the internet.

robertcoulson
April 7th, 2011, 07:58 PM
Patients for friends and ones you love.....

tgm4883
April 7th, 2011, 08:07 PM
Nope, doesn't drive me insane at all. It's a matter of respect. My friends and family come to me when then need assistance with their computer because they know I will give them support that is in their best interest. I've had family members come to me after taking their computer to a shop. What is insane is what those shops charge for some of their basic services they provide.

I won't send my friends or family away if they need help. If I can lend them support great. If not, hopefully I can help guide them to the right person.

youbuntu
April 7th, 2011, 08:07 PM
It's all very well you guys dishing out all these "be patient" comments, but I don't think you are the ones being asked how to do the same, simple thing, again and again. I work for a guy who is 73, and VERY computer illiterate; he asks me how to do something and writes it down and I never hear from him regarding it, again!

I have advised the member of my family to write things down, as I shall not be as willing or eager to teach things repeatedly ](*,)

I think you may be misunderstanding - I LOVE teaching people, but it drives me to the brink of insanity, when I am asked how to do the same thing ALL THE TIME, and it is not written down or remembered; it's as if they don't listen. I'm only human :)

tgm4883
April 7th, 2011, 08:09 PM
It's all very well you guys dishing out all these "be patient" comments, but I don't think you are the ones being asked how to do the same, simple thing, again and again. I work for a guy who is 73, and VERY computer illiterate; he asks me how to do something and writes it down and I never hear from him regarding it, again!

I have advised the member of my family to write things down, as I shall not be as willing or eager to teach things repeatedly ](*,)

I think you may be misunderstanding - I LOVE teaching people, but it drives me to the brink of insanity, when I am asked how to do the same thing ALL THE TIME, and it is not written down or remembered; it's as if they don't listen. I'm only human :)

You shouldn't assume you know other peoples lives, it makes you look foolish.

You started the thread and asked if others felt the same way. Some do, some don't. Don't knock other people for their opinions.

youbuntu
April 7th, 2011, 08:12 PM
You shouldn't assume you know other peoples lives, it makes you look foolish.

You started the thread and asked if others felt the same way. Some do, some don't. Don't knock other people for their opinions.

Who am/was I "knocking"? :?

uRock
April 7th, 2011, 08:12 PM
If someone keeps asking for the same help over and over, then teach them a different way and when they argue saying, "you told me to do it this way," laugh and point out that they already knew how to do it.

Or be honest and tell them you feel like they aren't listening.

Beware of the Karmic Koala.

Elfy
April 7th, 2011, 08:13 PM
Any topic or discussion that causes problems or drama will be closed

Closed

KiwiNZ
April 7th, 2011, 08:15 PM
It's all very well you guys dishing out all these "be patient" comments, but I don't think you are the ones being asked how to do the same, simple thing, again and again. I work for a guy who is 73, and VERY computer illiterate; he asks me how to do something and writes it down and I never hear from him regarding it, again!

I have advised the member of my family to write things down, as I shall not be as willing or eager to teach things repeatedly ](*,)

I think you may be misunderstanding - I LOVE teaching people, but it drives me to the brink of insanity, when I am asked how to do the same thing ALL THE TIME, and it is not written down or remembered; it's as if they don't listen. I'm only human :)

You assume wrong.

I have three family members like that, I show the many time the same thing it happens. When I returned from Aceh and ended up in a Wheelchair those three family members gave me 7 years unending support every week.

Will I keep repeating myself over some Word issue or some Powerpoint slide? damn right I will. Because without their unquestioning commitment to me, my recovery would have been a lot harder. See , "what goes around,comes around.

bodhi.zazen
April 7th, 2011, 09:24 PM
I open this thread by request in the resolution center.

I understand that repetitive questions can be irritating, I have 4 children (why daddy ? why ? why ? why ???), but you will need to find an appropriate outlet for such frustration.

Give a man a fish, feed him for a day, teach a man to fish ...

I think you need to either learn to teach the person involved how to answer their questions, or if they are unable (some people are impaired that way) learn patience.

You could of course write down the answer, sure it take a little more effort on your part then a verbal answer, but better then all this pent up frustration.

If the universe is nothing but frustration, then I advise you relax, drink some tea, or seek professional advice from a Psychologist.

sydbat
April 7th, 2011, 09:38 PM
I open this thread by request in the resolution center.

I understand that repetitive questions can be irritating, I have 4 children (why daddy ? why ? why ? why ???), but you will need to find an appropriate outlet for such frustration.

Give a man a fish, feed him for a day, teach a man to fish ...

I think you need to either learn to teach the person involved how to answer their questions, or if they are unable (some people are impaired that way) learn patience.

You could of course write down the answer, sure it take a little more effort on your part then a verbal answer, but better then all this pent up frustration.

If the universe is nothing but frustration, then I advise you relax, drink some tea, or seek professional advice from a Psychologist.Well said. And thank you for reopening this.


It's all very well you guys dishing out all these "be patient" comments, but I don't think you are the ones being asked how to do the same, simple thing, again and again. I work for a guy who is 73, and VERY computer illiterate; he asks me how to do something and writes it down and I never hear from him regarding it, again!

I have advised the member of my family to write things down, as I shall not be as willing or eager to teach things repeatedly ](*,)

I think you may be misunderstanding - I LOVE teaching people, but it drives me to the brink of insanity, when I am asked how to do the same thing ALL THE TIME, and it is not written down or remembered; it's as if they don't listen. I'm only human :)I understand what you are saying glossy. What does that say about me??:lolflag:

When someone in my family, or a friend, asks me to help with their computer problems, I help (at no charge). I actually tell them to come to me first, so they don't get screwed by Best Buy or wherever. And, as I stated earlier, my octogenarian father and in-laws have an excuse.

However, when the younger members of my family, or friends of my own age, continually ask the same things over and over and over, to the point where you wonder how they feed themselves, I start telling them I will charge them my going rate. Suddenly they know what to do...because they have actually done it so many times themselves.

I think that what glossy is getting at is the laziness of some people. They really do know what they are doing, because it really is simple things (like attaching something to an email). But, because we are the "computer expert", we should do it for them. To me, that is the wrong answer.

1clue
April 7th, 2011, 09:47 PM
<sickandtwisted>
Give a man a fire, and he will be warm for the evening. Set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life.
</sickandtwisted>

@GlossyWhite,

I doubt there is anyone on this thread who hasn't felt that irritation, but in my case I worked through it years ago, made my peace with the people in question and with myself.

FWIW, I have been that guy for some of the people who were that guy for me. Sometimes you just don't get it and need to be that guy, and other times you gotta put up with that guy.

It's karma.

Peace out. 8)

Wobblybob
April 7th, 2011, 10:25 PM
yep, I'm tech support at work all day and then again at home and why oh why are they all windows pc's that need fixing?

1clue
April 7th, 2011, 11:17 PM
yep, I'm tech support at work all day and then again at home and why oh why are they all windows pc's that need fixing?

+1!

Strangers -- I tell them I'm a computer programmer and they want me to fix their #$%@ virus problems. I have never had antivirus software on any machine I've owned because I've never needed any, and they have these problems because they can't get off the porn sites on an operating system I've never really used for anything but software testing.

pricetech
April 7th, 2011, 11:30 PM
Helping the person who was there when I threw up when I was sick
Helping the person that got up at 2am when I was having a nightmare and still smiled
Helping the person who always comforted me when I fell off my bike
Helping the person who still nursed me through teenaged hangovers
Helping the person who was on call for help when I didn't have a clue with our new born babies, no matter what time.
The list is long but the picture is clear.

Gee, helping with a bit a tech support just doesn't stack up really.

Well said sir. My mother was a smart lady, but some things she just couldn't understand. Her sons were always there for her when one of those things came along. I think we can all be just a little bit proud of that.

pricetech
April 7th, 2011, 11:34 PM
Also, your argument is a little flawed, as, who ELSE was going to take the responsibilities that a parent HAS to take on board?

Ask a child who's been abandoned or abused or simply caught up in a failed relationship.

Mom and Dad owed us NOTHING. They raised us as best they could because they loved us, not because they were stuck with us.

I'm done now.

ctrlmd
April 7th, 2011, 11:51 PM
well i don't mind helping my mother/sisters/brothers in any kind of tech problem
they always come to me and i always helping them without complaining

3177
April 7th, 2011, 11:56 PM
Helping the person who was there when I threw up when I was sick
Helping the person that got up at 2am when I was having a nightmare and still smiled
Helping the person who always comforted me when I fell off my bike
Helping the person who still nursed me through teenaged hangovers
Helping the person who was on call for help when I didn't have a clue with our new born babies, no matter what time.
The list is long but the picture is clear.

Gee, helping with a bit a tech support just doesn't stack up really.

+1

Parents put up with us for at least 18 years, the least we can do is help out.
I'm sure they told us the same thing over and over.(I do to mine)

Paqman
April 8th, 2011, 12:09 AM
</frustrated vent>

No amount of frustration and heartache on your part will ever balance the amount you've caused your parents over the years. Cut them some slack, they've earned it.

bodhi.zazen
April 8th, 2011, 12:12 AM
I'm sure they told us the same thing over and over.(I do to mine)

As a parent to 4 children I LOL to death.

Now clean your room !

Dyzphagia
April 8th, 2011, 12:15 AM
Now I didn't think I would post something like this as an introduction, but that's just as fine. I can understand the original poster's feelings all well, but I also understand the others saying that you shouldn't be too upset with helping out family. Myself? I personally get irritated a little bit. That's mainly because everyone who asks me for help, usually does it just when I'm in the middle of a game or work. Do I take it out on them or blame them? No, they certainly wouldn't have known. When my parents ask for my help with computers, mainly my mom, I help without thinking about it. I'm not helping her because she raised me, I raised myself nearly, but I do it because they helped me so much. The past few years I was caught up in all sorts of trouble, they helped me through it all. They helped me even though I was nothing more than a liar and a thief. They helped me even though I was on a path of self-destruction and all I did was hurt them over and over. They helped me get my life back on track. Recently they helped me finally finish high school and loaned me the money to get my vehicle fixed. Now I didn't intend for this to be long, but I'm trying to point out that I'm helping them because they helped me. I'm not helping them because they're my parents, I'm helping them because they've helped me.

Now I'm not saying you can't be a little irritated when they ask you the same thing over and over, I'm just saying to take it in stride. I help people who help me. Hell if it wasn't for half the people I know, I'd still be in the gutter myself.

If you're getting irritated because they just won't learn how to do it themselves, don't. If I don't know what I'm doing in life, I ask my parents and friends, they'll explain things to me I'm not used to doing. I mean I still ask my mother how to properly make eggs over easy. Depressing? Not really. She's taught me countless times over the past ten years and still does it with a smile on her face, why? Because we help each other. I help her with computers, she helps me with cooking, mainly the small things I easily overlook. When it comes to friends, I have one who helps me out with my vehicle as much as he can in exchange for my work on his computer.

I don't feel like typing out anymore as this post already feels long, but like I say. Take their requests for help in stride. If you help people, they'll help you. Karma or whatever you want to call it.

dnairb
April 8th, 2011, 12:16 AM
I feel exactly the same as the OP, except that my situation is work related.
There is no IT department at my small employer. As I do such strange things as read help files, actually notice alert boxes, and remember what I did last time I wanted to do something, I get asked, over and over again "how do I...?" Unfortunately, this being in a workplace I can't speak my mind without there being consequences.

Timmer1240
April 8th, 2011, 12:47 AM
Helping the person who was there when I threw up when I was sick
Helping the person that got up at 2am when I was having a nightmare and still smiled
Helping the person who always comforted me when I fell off my bike
Helping the person who still nursed me through teenaged hangovers
Helping the person who was on call for help when I didn't have a clue with our new born babies, no matter what time.
The list is long but the picture is clear.

Gee, helping with a bit a tech support just doesn't stack up really.

Yes Im always there for my Mom and friends if their having problems it feels good to help other people Most of the time!

youbuntu
April 8th, 2011, 12:55 AM
Guys... guys...

I get that I should be more patient, yes. I also get that I need to find an alternative (and better) way to teach my family how to use their PC properly. I understand all your points about parents being parents, and them having been there all these years - yes, so true. As for the point I was making earlier about kids not asking to be born, well I am completely sticking with that, although of course I am grateful that I was raised well, and treated in a loving way, and not adopted out. I count my blessings daily. My point may have not have come across well - I was merely saying that a baby didn't ask to be born, it just IS, and parents do ultimately have a fundamental responsibility to raise that child (unless extenuating circumstances mean otherwise), and the baby/toddler has no comprehension or understanding of "being grateful", as their birth came about from actions out of their control.

I'm sure everyone's an expert on advising the next man how he should pay gratitude to his friends and family - I am by no means perfect, and I do get hot and bothered a bit too easily at times, but the people that know me accept that I do not mean to, and that I am a good guy and willing to help anyone, without ever wanting something so ridiculous as payment :). Dishing out advice to people whom you have never met is the easiest thing in the world - anyone can be counsel to a stranger, and feel good about giving what they feel is the best advice, because they only see one item in the picture, and not the extra detail that makes up the painting that is that person's whole life, family etc, and what causes their tensions and stresses, as a family.

Here is some advice, take it or leave it; never, ever presume to know what happens within the family of a stranger - you are no person to judge another, as his life and background is yet unknown to you.

Phew, anyhow - tech support... I may have to write down a "fact sheet" of Gmail & OpenOffice basics for my folks, so I get less earache and repeated questions. I've tried to leave the home PC logged into GNU/Linux as much as possible, so they use it... but you know how it is in the MS dependancy scheme of things :roll: :lol:

WOW! ~660+ views! WhoDaThunkIt?!

Keep it flowing, God bless you guys! :D

Dyzphagia
April 8th, 2011, 01:03 AM
I apologize if it looked as if I were judging you. Merely throwing my two cents in there, so my apologies for any offense.

youbuntu
April 8th, 2011, 01:07 AM
I apologize if it looked as if I were judging you. Merely throwing my two cents in there, so my apologies for any offense.

Noone has offended me my friend, all is cool, I promise you, but thank you for saying so :D

handy
April 8th, 2011, 01:20 AM
Do you ever feel as if you're the permanently on-call family tech support agent? Do you have your family ask you the same BASIC questions about the simplest of tasks again and again? <snip>

I used to be a self employed sole trader, tech' support guy. 10 years was all I could handle. Loved it at first, though it is stressful at times, learned to really dislike it in the end so I retired. Dumped Windows & all my associated software tools & went to Linux, (bought an iMac a couple of years later, but it runs Arch anyway. ;))



No? Well you are blessed then. My Mother asks me around 2 times a month how to do the same things in Gmail... "how do I attach a photo/.doc/pdf to Gmail", and the SIMPLE advice never seems to persist in her memory... she just asks me again, next time... and again, and again... ARGHH!

Whenever I had to teach someone how to do something I would always have them sitting in the drivers seat, mouse/keyboard in hand. Instruct them slowly, clearly & make notes on the steps to follow for future reference. A little alphabetically indexed reference book can be useful, its also harder to lose.

When a person does it themselves, mouse in hand, it brings other parts of the brain into play which can improve their chances of remembering somewhat.

You could create a website with a FAQ & point them to it. Which reminds me of the current debate about the forum archives here & putting energy into creating a great wiki which becomes the prime point of reference, not the forum, as has been done by the Arch community. :)

Retlol
April 8th, 2011, 01:22 AM
I don't mind.

Phone.

Dude, can you take a look at my laptop, application x doesn't work?

Sure, if you bring me a 6 pack and a pack of smokes. I'm dry.

----> win


:p

linuxforartists
April 8th, 2011, 01:34 AM
So far, I haven't had "tech support" requests. But I'm studying web design, so they're probably on the way! Like another poster said, anything computer-related gets heard by your friends and family as "fixes computers."

My background is in writing and editing. I wish I had 2 cents for everyone who asked me to "have a quick look" at their essay, resume, or other document. Whenever the work is invisible or looks easy, people are reluctant to pay.

"But you just looked at it for a minute!" they say. I'd love to respond, "But I caught the 10 mistakes that would have gotten your application rejected. How much is this scholarship/job/whatever worth to you?"

There are people you'll always help, no questions asked. Like the person who visited you in the hospital when your other friends were "too busy" to come.

It's more the "freeloaders" I avoid. They're the ones who only call when they need help. Never give you invites to hang out, grab coffee, go to a party. When I notice that pattern in a new acquaintance, I start making myself unavailable.

"Keeping score" can seem crude, but you need to be aware if you're being taken advantage of. You have to weigh up how much the relationship is worth to you.

For me, it's really a case-by-case basis. I couldn't just reject every request. My luck being what it is, I'd probably get into some trouble and desperately need the help of the very person I turned down.

To lighten the mood, here's a comic about this situation: Why it's better to pretend you don't know anything about computers (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/computers).

zer010
April 8th, 2011, 01:49 AM
I'm surprised no one has posted this...

Edit: perhaps if the questions are always the same, you SHOULD pre-empt them with a handy cheat sheet. ;)

youbuntu
April 8th, 2011, 02:30 AM
I'm surprised no one has posted this...

Edit: perhaps if the questions are always the same, you SHOULD pre-empt them with a handy cheat sheet. ;)

Just mass mailed that to family & friends! Brilliant! ^_^

tgm4883
April 8th, 2011, 03:00 AM
It's all very well you guys dishing out all these "be patient" comments, but I don't think you are the ones being asked how to do the same, simple thing, again and again. I work for a guy who is 73, and VERY computer illiterate; he asks me how to do something and writes it down and I never hear from him regarding it, again!

<snip>



<snip>

Here is some advice, take it or leave it; never, ever presume to know what happens within the family of a stranger - you are no person to judge another, as his life and background is yet unknown to you.

<snip>

Maybe you should take your own advice. :shock:



You shouldn't assume you know other peoples lives, it makes you look foolish.

<snip>

Oh wait, I guess it wasn't your advice. :lol:

youbuntu
April 8th, 2011, 03:06 AM
Maybe you should take your own advice. :shock:




Oh wait, I guess it wasn't your advice. :lol:

Wow, you're a true genius of ironic humour. Maybe some of the good advice subconsciously sunk in, without me noticing, hey!

Moving on...

zer010
April 8th, 2011, 05:14 AM
I try to be helpful at times.... ^.^d

However, I actually did mean for you to write specific cheat sheets for those oft asked questions. You yourself said that those that wrote things down were nary a problem...thus...Cheat Sheets!
I will say that the XKCD flowchart is a good start and I too have given it to many people. It may be humorous, but humour is always based on a grain of truth. :lol

piquat
April 8th, 2011, 06:22 AM
My parents are in their 70's.

It's been years since they've had a virus and it's only happened once.

Occasionally they loose a toolbar or can't figure out how to open an attachment, but normally, I'm AMAZED at how well their machine runs considering they are fairly anti-technology and at this point in their lives, pretty adverse to learning new things.

It's either because I did a good job of teaching them, or because my father is a natural problem solver. I'm betting on the latter.

HermanAB
April 8th, 2011, 09:35 AM
Nowadays, I mostly send people looking for Windows help to a couple of support forums, e.g. Major Geeks and Bleeping Computer and explain that I use mainly Linux, since I use computers for more serious stuff and cannot afford having computer systems that break as easily as Windows.

If get a "WTF???" look, I reply "Military" - "Ohh..."

Most people nowadays seem to know that Linux is a viable alternative system, since it is mentioned on the BBC and CNN quite often, which is a nice turn of events. Previously the Microsoft indoctrination was so total that most people had a sad resignation and thought they had no choice than to put up with it.

Once in a while I help some down trodden soul who is very tired of Windows trouble install some kind of Linux. The best for newcomers seem to be Mint and Fedora, since it is trivial to get the multimedia features to work on those two (the Fedora Plus wizard is really magical).

Spike-X
April 8th, 2011, 11:02 AM
You are not alone.

I recall a conversation with a brother in law some years ago now. Somehow the topic of MS Windows came up, and he who started using Windows long before I did asked me, half seriously, "What's Windows?" Unfortunately I had yet to discover this forum, so I hadn't had the influences that would allow me to come up with a witty rejoinder in the "something to look out of" tradition.

Look out of, or look out for?

Tristam Green
April 8th, 2011, 12:31 PM
Just mass mailed that to family & friends! Brilliant! ^_^

Because potentially alienating your friends and family for the sake of some lulz is classy.



WOW! ~660+ views! WhoDaThunkIt?!

Keep it flowing, God bless you guys! :D

http://images.wikia.com/villains/images/d/de/Audrey2.jpg

FEED ME!

youbuntu
April 8th, 2011, 01:30 PM
Because potentially alienating your friends and family for the sake of some lulz is classy.



http://images.wikia.com/villains/images/d/de/Audrey2.jpg

FEED ME!

Excuse me?...

slackthumbz
April 8th, 2011, 01:44 PM
I simply started refusing to support windows systems a few years ago. I told my less technical family/friends that if they wanted 24/7 support for their computers they could a)pay for my time because they were using A LOT of it, b)pay someone else who would probably charge more or use linux which I would support for free but on the condition that they realised that there would be a learning curve and once I'd solved a trivial issue for them once they would be expected to pay attention and do it themselves next time.

Several of them took me up on the linux option so I set up ubuntu for them, gave them the websites for the forums and a few other resources on using linux and I've hardly had any requests for help since. The amount of basic system maintenance I get asked to do has gone down by a factor of around 3/4.

Cracklepop
April 8th, 2011, 01:45 PM
I haven't had a call since switching my parents from XP to Ubuntu, and same story with my sister and one brother. ;)
The only family member in the same city as me still wanting support is my girlfriend who insists on having an XP guest in a VM on an Ubuntu host so she can use windows skype instead of linux skype! Guess what every problem is related to? XP/vbox...

pricetech
April 8th, 2011, 10:41 PM
<snip> my girlfriend who insists on having an XP guest in a VM </snip>


I'd refuse to <snip> until she gives up XP.

Just kidding.

youbuntu
April 8th, 2011, 11:35 PM
I'd refuse to <snip> until she gives up XP.

Just kidding.

She'd probably put you under with chloroform... and give YOU the <snip> ;) :P

lol!

spoons
April 9th, 2011, 12:44 AM
Excuse me?...

That's Little Shop Of Horrors, but no, I don't get the reference either. :p

youbuntu
April 9th, 2011, 12:46 AM
That's Little Shop Of Horrors, but no, I don't get the reference either. :p

Kind of defeats the object of (attempting) humour, if it is so abstract that noone understands it... :P

bodhi.zazen
April 9th, 2011, 12:49 AM
Kind of defeats the object of (attempting) humour, if it is so abstract that noone understands it... :P

Ask me if I am a duck ...

LowSky
April 9th, 2011, 12:52 AM
I helped one aunt last night and my uncle just an hour ago. My aunt's issue was Excel wouldn't print, yet Adobe reader would, I'm betting her printer was not set up correctly. I live an hour away and it was a work PC so I could directly connect to it, and she was horrible at describing the issue over the phone. I actually had he send me the document by email, then I would convert it to a PDF then send it back.. She made me do this 5 times until it was corrected to her liking. My uncle who also lives an hour away was having issues with his router disconnecting randomly. I was able to to run TeamViewer and change his router settings from my house.

I try to help family and friends when I can, but they know I don't work for free.

RiceMonster
April 9th, 2011, 01:07 AM
Kind of defeats the object of (attempting) humour, if it is so abstract that noone understands it... :P

It's not exactly an obscure movie, and "FEED ME SEYMOUR" is the most famous line from the movie.

tgm4883
April 9th, 2011, 01:39 AM
Kind of defeats the object of (attempting) humour, if it is so abstract that noone understands it... :P

I understood it. He was responding to your comment about how many people have looked at this thread and you asking to keep it flowing.

In other words, he was calling you an attention *****. I can't say I disagree with him.

uRock
April 9th, 2011, 01:42 AM
This thread has drifted way off topic.

Thread closed.