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View Full Version : Which is your favorite computer manufacturer?



Antarctica32
March 7th, 2011, 12:41 AM
Please choose your favorite. Mine is first Dell then HP. My dad was always an HP lover, but my first computer was a Dell.

Dustin2128
March 7th, 2011, 12:47 AM
Myself.

Antarctica32
March 7th, 2011, 12:50 AM
Building computers is very fun. The only reason I didn't select it is because I have very little experience with it.

FuturePilot
March 7th, 2011, 01:01 AM
I just built my own computer for the first time. I definitely prefer building one over a pre-built one.

cptrohn
March 7th, 2011, 01:03 AM
I like building and configuring my own systems.... get exactly the features I want that way.

LinuxFox
March 7th, 2011, 01:04 AM
I used a custom built desktop computer before it broke. I voted for homebuilt since it seemed the closest choice. I actually got mine built by a local PC shop where I live.

Though a friend is going to fix it for me. Hopefully I'll be able to use it again since it was good computer. It came with Windows XP Home, without all the added software manufacturers add and I later used Ubuntu 8.04 on it.

gnomeuser
March 7th, 2011, 01:05 AM
I used to be a 100% home built only kind of person but lately I have found a lot of joy in the lower end nettop and nettop market.

The performance is sufficient now though I would like a little bit more and an ATI video card rather than the nvidia ion I have now. The price is unbeatable.

Acer provides my nettop and I am very pleased with it. Asus provided my nettop and that has become the best laptop I have ever used. It is so handy to bring to town to work.

Overall I think Acer has the most interesting line for home users. Their line includes such things as small home servers (running Windows Home Server though you can install Linux on it I suspect), really well designed nettops (and recently with AMD/ATI chips in them).

The outside contender for me right now is Genesi, I just ordered the ARM+Ubuntu powered netbook and I am very much looking forward to what they can do with the A9 or A15 ARM designs for their nettop. How the 3D video support is handled for this is going to determine if such a product becomes a must have.

So for me, I like small quiet machines that pack sufficient power to do work and light gaming, I go with Acer.

For higher end machines I have had good experiences with Dell for desktops, no experience for laptops. Lenovo for laptops is a horror show and their business practices are troublesome, I tend to avoid them.

cblnchat
March 7th, 2011, 01:46 AM
I voted dell cause its the only one ive ever really used, but i love home built computers. But i havent actually done it yet. I really wanna! Is it hard to homebuild a computer?

Dustin2128
March 7th, 2011, 04:32 AM
I voted dell cause its the only one ive ever really used, but i love home built computers. But i havent actually done it yet. I really wanna! Is it hard to homebuild a computer?
It's not hard at all, as long as your hardware's compatible it's like putting legos together.

Jay Car
March 7th, 2011, 04:40 AM
I voted dell cause its the only one ive ever really used, but i love home built computers. But i havent actually done it yet. I really wanna! Is it hard to homebuild a computer?

You really should give it a try. It can be a little nerve-wracking the first time, but it's also a lot of fun...and it feels really good when it's all finished and everything works.

If I can do it, anyone can.

lisati
March 7th, 2011, 04:48 AM
I used to be a fan of HP printers, until one packed a sad on me. The price of ink cartridges doesn't help - a HP photo printer I have but don't use takes a cartridge that cost something like $NZ90 the last time I checked.

My server is a Compaq, which in one sense counts as an HP, it has done me well for nearly 6 years, though a bit more "grunt" would be appreciated.

My current laptop (and its predecessor) is Toshiba. It's a couple of years old, and still going strong, but smoking-related gunk tends to get in the keys a bit more easily than I'd like.

GabrielYYZ
March 7th, 2011, 04:48 AM
+1 on the legos comment.

i like building my own computers, it's more satisfying that way and you decide exactly what goes into it. plus, less useless junk on the main disk ("recovery partitions" pfft) and you get to choose your Operating System(s).

handy
March 7th, 2011, 04:53 AM
Some of the info' on this site is interesting with regards to the effects computer manufacturing process on the environment:

http://www.greenpeace.org/international/campaigns/toxics/electronics/how-the-companies-line-up/

Khakilang
March 7th, 2011, 05:04 AM
Actual I prefer home built computer but if I were to recommend to friends it would be IBM/Lenovo because of its reliability. They built to last.

akand074
March 7th, 2011, 05:17 AM
I prefer making my own computer too, obviously, but for laptops that isn't very easy, and also I'm not a manufacturer, so I voted HP.

HP is great I think, putting aside things that are common to all manufacturers ("my laptop broke after only 2 years!", "my laptop overheats all the time" etc.) as I noticed quite a bit of those times it's 1) user induced, or at least no help from the user in that sense, or 2) Windows related (I've had people complain about their speakers stop working, when it turned out it was just a driver issue).

Putting that aside, they have the largest variety of laptops, for every single price range, with pretty much all types of hardware. Low end to high end AMD and Intel processors, ATI and NVidia graphics cards, and especially recently, their bodies are gorgeous, most are made of metal now and they have nice engravings on them. Often great keyboards, especially now that they are using chicklet keyboards, nice big touchpad now. They can often be very modestly priced too when on sale for such a big company. I don't put "reliability" as a major factor, as generally, I find they are all similar and often it's not really much at fault of the manufacturer.

I've heard a lot of people complain about HP, but everybody complains about every single manufacturer really, I've heard complaints about them all and I think I hear complaints about HP the most is because they have the largest sales. I also love their printers, great quality at a great price and with great cost per page. I completely disagree with @lisati, the thing with printers is that you have to buy the exact printer for your exact needs. Most people just go in and see wow a printer on sale for 50$! and buy it. Well obviously the ink is going to be pricey. The lower end the model you get, generally the more expensive the ink is. Also there is a difference between printers designed for photos and ones designed for documents. For example HPs photosmart inks are based on dyes and often won't give out as much ink for documents, while their officejets are based on pigments and often give a huge amount of ink at a very modest price.

I never mentioned desktops because, well I always build my own, and always recommend that to everyone.

Hedgehog1
March 7th, 2011, 05:29 AM
This question is not as simple as it sounds.

For an Ubuntu Desktop, homebuilt (and that is how I voted).

But for Windows laptops, HP.

For corporate desktops and severs, IBM currently makes the most robust stuff (HP is a VERY close second).

My ultimate computer is the 12 core Mac Pro! Man would solitaire play fast on that!

The Hedge

:KS

johntaylor1887
March 7th, 2011, 07:47 AM
Home built all the way.

Lucradia
March 7th, 2011, 10:08 AM
I prefer homebuilt; but if I had to go pre-built, it would be ASUS. Printers would be HP Laser Monochrome, all-in-one with Ethernet at least.

Sean Moran
March 7th, 2011, 11:54 AM
I voted for Compaq, but not HP, although now they are one and the same, I realise.

Home-built has always been the way for me, until the last 18 months - the laptop era.

Before, the usual 'home-built' involved picking something up out of the classifieds and adding to it, and the last goodie for a desktop was the Compaq PII desktop 233Mhz. I still have it back in storage in Perth, but it's too big for carryon luggage with Tiger Airways.

Back in 1991-92, I worked for a place that did high-end systems for corporate/govt clients, and we only did NEC, Toshiba (laptops) HP and Compaq back then. The number of HP machines I got to clean out with a hose and a brush and an hairdryer that had been in the back of a 4x4 for some mining company that rolled in a river during a flash flood - HP are (were) the mil-spec of computers - bulletproof hardware.

Back then though, it was Compaq were like the Ferarris of computers. For men like me who need to compensate with speedy toys and bright red colours.

I always respected HP for the high standard of QC, but Compaq is the one that spurs my imagination.

:roll:

FoxEWolf
March 7th, 2011, 07:25 PM
Apple.. <initiate> start drama </initiate>

wojox
March 7th, 2011, 07:41 PM
I voted Dell. Have always been impressed with the price and harware they use.

Caboose885
March 7th, 2011, 07:48 PM
I like building my own. You definitely get more bang for the buck.

However I have to buy prebuilt laptops because it is basically impossible to build your own laptop. :( Laptops I buy Dell.

I can't stand HP because they die so quickly. HP is notorious for the bad GPUs.

SE7EN-LOCSTA
March 7th, 2011, 08:00 PM
i honestly prefer asus. when buying a new computer last year, i was planning on going the homebuilt route, but i decided in the end that if i could find a computer with the @ the same specs that i was looking for for less than 100$ more than making it homebuilt i would buy it premade. i've got a moderate amount of experience with the inner workings of a tower, but the installation of processor/heatsink was something i had never attempted (and honestly it scared the **** outta me-the horror stories ive seen) after shopping online for over a month, i found the computer i have now (specs in sig-extra hd and cpu cooler added this year)

i paid @800$ for it, and its (%^in awesome.. maybe not the top of the top, but its really unbeatable for less than a grand, starting from scratch. had an old p4 dell that had 0 parts i could 'Frankenstein' into my new pc. trying to do a homebuild would end up costing me at least 50% more. maybe i was looking in wrong places, as i try to shy away from ebay, but i looked around tigerdirect, fryes, bestbuy, and newegg for parts and couldnt even compare for anywhere close in price.

the miscellaneous parts in it were sub-par. it came with 1 fan when it needed 2.. 20$, cpu cooler (but is a given that you need to replace stock for extreme gaming) and power supply is a bit low 500w when it needs 600w. but, in it's defense, i used the prebuilt parts in it for over a year with no problems, and still havent replaced the power supply.. it runs every game ive ever thrown at it at max on windows 7. it's on a to do list, but with it running fine without it, i dont see any of them as 'critical'. definitly recomend them to anyone looking for a cheap way to play the newest games out, and eventually spend a small bit to add to power and cooling parts when they have the time/money.

JRV
March 7th, 2011, 09:17 PM
My desktop machines are always home built, My netbook is an Asus.

NightwishFan
March 7th, 2011, 09:29 PM
I really really like asus. I bought a laptop of theirs at best buy, without really considering it much, it just was the best fit. Turns out it runs with the completely free kernel on Debian 6. It is very low power as well, getting over 4 hours of battery on Linux. They seem to distribute very Linux friendly hardware (except the via soundcard, which works (I suppose) so I have no problems with it).

I will certainly buy an Asus again. (that or zareason)

cascade9
March 7th, 2011, 09:34 PM
i honestly prefer asus. when buying a new computer last year, i was planning on going the homebuilt route, but i decided in the end that if i could find a computer with the @ the same specs that i was looking for for less than 100$ more than making it homebuilt i would buy it premade. i've got a moderate amount of experience with the inner workings of a tower, but the installation of processor/heatsink was something i had never attempted (and honestly it scared the **** outta me-the horror stories ive seen) after shopping online for over a month, i found the computer i have now (specs in sig-extra hd and cpu cooler added this year)

the miscellaneous parts in it were sub-par. it came with 1 fan when it needed 2.. 20$, cpu cooler (but is a given that you need to replace stock for extreme gaming) and power supply is a bit low 500w when it needs 600w. but, in it's defense, i used the prebuilt parts in it for over a year with no problems, and still havent replaced the power supply.. it runs every game ive ever thrown at it at max on windows 7.

I havent checked the asus intel iX pre-built systems, but with AMD they are sub-par. Cut down boards, eg, less power phases and poorer voltage controls, so they have95watts TDP max, which limts the upgradablity (decent boards go to 125watts), lame power supplies, not the best build quailty.

Where on earth did yuo hear you need to replace the stock cooler for 'extreme gaming'? Thats just wrong in my experience. For much in the way of overclocking, yeah, the stock coolers from intel or AMD arent great, but at stock speeds, you should be fine.

BTW, asus has been making 'coporate' motherboards for dell, compaq, HP et all for years now. Thats why they moved into making prebuilt boxxen, they have the experience at making cut-down boards.

After that, its obvious that my favourite manufacturer is buying parts from whoever has the best deal at the time, and building it myself.

I dont use laptops, so I dont have to worry about that. Its a pity the OCZ (and some others) 'DYI laptops' disappeared, they tended to be better quality than most of the other laptops. (I dont use them, but I've built a few, and repaired a lot more)

fuduntu
March 7th, 2011, 09:34 PM
I'm pretty fond of Asus.

jerenept
March 7th, 2011, 11:52 PM
This question is not as simple as it sounds.

My ultimate computer is the 12 core Mac Pro! Man would solitaire play fast on that!

The Hedge

:KS

Can has 12 cores and whatever OS you want? @NewEgg (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100007629%20600007992&IsNodeId=1&name=Dual%201207%28F%29)

scouser73
March 7th, 2011, 11:57 PM
HP. this is my first ever branded pc.

Old_Grey_Wolf
March 8th, 2011, 02:08 AM
I have had home computers for 30 years. My openion of the manufactures changes over time. Each seems to have their good years and their bad years.

Currently I prefer Dell for laptops, HP/Compaq or Lenovo for desktops, HP for servers, and Toshiba for netbooks.

Ask me again in a year or so and I may give a different answer.

linuxforartists
March 8th, 2011, 10:26 AM
Nice to see the positive comments for Asus. They're my favorite brand too. Has anyone bought "factory refurbished" Asus laptops? I saw some good deals on Best Buy's website.

The 14-inch Asus Bamboo laptop looks pretty sweet. Has anyone run Ubuntu on one yet? The Asus Bamboo laptops on Best Buy have Intel graphics cards, while the ones on Amazon.com have Nvidia cards w/ Optimus technology (and are more expensive). I'm leaning towards the Bamboo laptops from Best Buy, since Intel cards work better with Linux.

Lucradia
March 8th, 2011, 03:16 PM
since Intel cards work better with Linux.

But they're still the worst for gaming, even on linux. They also don't have GLX/XGL, and some functions of compiz will work horribly on Intel cards (DO NOT, turn on Blur!)

SE7EN-LOCSTA
March 9th, 2011, 04:58 AM
I havent checked the asus intel iX pre-built systems, but with AMD they are sub-par. Cut down boards, eg, less power phases and poorer voltage controls, so they have95watts TDP max, which limts the upgradablity (decent boards go to 125watts), lame power supplies, not the best build quailty.

Where on earth did yuo hear you need to replace the stock cooler for 'extreme gaming'? Thats just wrong in my experience. For much in the way of overclocking, yeah, the stock coolers from intel or AMD arent great, but at stock speeds, you should be fine.

BTW, asus has been making 'coporate' motherboards for dell, compaq, HP et all for years now. Thats why they moved into making prebuilt boxxen, they have the experience at making cut-down boards.

After that, its obvious that my favourite manufacturer is buying parts from whoever has the best deal at the time, and building it myself.

I dont use laptops, so I dont have to worry about that. Its a pity the OCZ (and some others) 'DYI laptops' disappeared, they tended to be better quality than most of the other laptops. (I dont use them, but I've built a few, and repaired a lot more)

well, for the stock cooler, i have been told by many people (usually sales people, lol) that a stock cooler isnt really meant to cool for the newest/intensive games. i never really needed it, nor did i 'need' a second case fan or power supply upgrade, but i like to side with caution. melt my processor or graphics card.. 200 bucks each, mess up ram or harddrive, at least 100 bucks. im poor :( so i figured id get some preventative components at tax time while i had the money, rather than 'maybe' something break a time when i couldnt replace it and be left with a computer that i cant use at all til i got money.

as far as the board, you are correct with the 'cut down' board. it is a lower version of the rampage 2 extreme, with sli being disabled on the board. ive heard you can flash the bios to fix that, but its in my 'scare-zone' and not something id attempt. sli is not something im interested in anyways. being bought over a year ago, my card still runs any new game at max, minus dx11 (the 400 series came out shortly after i bought this) i figure if one card can max it out with no troubles, whats a 2nd gonna do worth that much money? physx? can use an older card as a dedicated one. multi-screen.. too rich for me.

anyways, it comes with some nice features, like easy overclocking and whatnot (of course, only for windows-boot tho) maybe ive missed out on some performance from one 'cut down' or another, but ive noticed nothing that takes away from what i want it to do (gaming) for a person trying to jump into brand new games at max while spending as little money as possible, id recommend it to anyone that cant find a better solution from a build your own computer way.

leclerc65
March 9th, 2011, 05:08 AM
My desktop machines are always home built, My netbook is an Asus.
Same here.

Cathhsmom
March 9th, 2011, 05:10 AM
My favorite is Toshiba.

|{urse
March 9th, 2011, 05:14 AM
Just like everyone else with a couple braincells, I'm my favorite computer manufacturer. -BUT- If I had to pick one current laptop manufacturer as "the best" I'd have to say Acer since theyve ditched the crappy compal chassis and went with clevo. Plus theyre uber-cheap so if I have to replace a screen or keyboard or some necessary part, I'm still under budget in 4 years.

Just a sidenote; Clevo and Compal make almost every laptop you've ever used except a few companies like IBM, who designed the thinkpad chassis. That's what Lenovo uses now.

http://www.compal.com/index_En.htm

http://www.clevo.com.tw/en/index.asp

GWBouge
March 9th, 2011, 05:51 AM
For the general population that doesn't want to deal with assembly, doesn't know anything about computers and/or doesn't want to research compatible equipment, hardware/software installation or configuration, who isn't going to overclock, doesn't upgrade every 6 months, and wants/needs a 'cover-all' warranty, 24/7 tech support, the comfort in just opening one box and having stuff work, or, ya know, a payment plan ... I vote for Dell. I've used a few (still have one as my main system ... 3yrs old and still rockin) and have sent a few friends and family members that direction to get their new PC, and all have been more than happy with what they've got.

Of course, that being said, I personally prefer everything that goes into building your own. Picking the right hardware, putting it together, configuring to your needs, pulling your hair out when something goes wrong or you get faulty hardware ... OH what FUN!

Jagoly
March 9th, 2011, 08:08 AM
I'll go for whichever company actually provides Linux drivers. In my experience, (TWO WHOLE LAPTOPS, and an ENTIRE DESKTOP), dell and toshiba are good for this. Sadly HP seems to purposley hide all Linux drivers from you...

piquat
March 9th, 2011, 09:56 AM
I LOVE building them.

If I won the lottery I'd put a couple together, at my own pace, maybe one or two a month, and just give them away to people I thought could use them.

Short of building, I'd pick Dell. Work has tons of them and they seem fairly reliable.

cascade9
March 9th, 2011, 10:17 AM
My ultimate computer is the 12 core Mac Pro! Man would solitaire play fast on that!

Only 12 cores? For that much money?

You could get 24 cores for less than a mac pro....


well, for the stock cooler, i have been told by many people (usually sales people, lol) that a stock cooler isnt really meant to cool for the newest/intensive games. i never really needed it, nor did i 'need' a second case fan or power supply upgrade, but i like to side with caution. melt my processor or graphics card.. 200 bucks each, mess up ram or harddrive, at least 100 bucks. im poor :( so i figured id get some preventative components at tax time while i had the money, rather than 'maybe' something break a time when i couldnt replace it and be left with a computer that i cant use at all til i got money.

Never trust a salesperson. I know somebody who runs 3Dstudio Max, Maya, and other very intensive programs and uses the stock i7 cooler without a problem.

I'm not saying that you shouldnt have done what you did, it make sense. ;)

handy
March 9th, 2011, 10:25 AM
Amiga, without a doubt.

Rasa1111
March 9th, 2011, 10:28 AM
Id rather have a nice home built above any pre-built..
but I chose IBM/Lenovo. <3

|{urse
March 9th, 2011, 11:36 PM
lol.. I forgot Tandy <-- best ever.

Lucradia
March 9th, 2011, 11:37 PM
lol.. I forgot Tandy <-- best ever.

The Computer Experts!

NightwishFan
March 9th, 2011, 11:39 PM
Aha good ol' Tandy 1000 :D

weasel fierce
March 10th, 2011, 05:32 AM
Commodore :D

weasel fierce
March 10th, 2011, 05:33 AM
Amiga, without a doubt.

this man knows what he is talking about.

PCs are pretty much interchangeable as far as I figure

Philsoki
March 10th, 2011, 11:10 AM
myself.
Same. QFT.

Frogs Hair
March 10th, 2011, 03:35 PM
Home built for desktop.

BrokenKingpin
March 10th, 2011, 05:34 PM
I prefer to build my own desktops, but I can't build my own laptop, so I gave HP my vote as I have had a lot of success with HP laptops.

unknownPoster
March 10th, 2011, 08:37 PM
Apple. Only manufacturer who I have never had problems with, on the customer service, or hardware side.