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LinuxFox
March 3rd, 2011, 04:25 PM
Using my Windows partition got me wondering, does anyone who dual-boot or use a Mac or Windows computer along with their Linux one find any proprietary software useful? Whether it's small or big.

I'm not crazy for iTunes, but I actually like its print CD cover feature. Also, Windows Media Player 11 and Streets and Trips are two Microsoft programs I actually like using.

I understand Linux is about free software and open source. I'm not looking for a fight or argument, just wondering if anyone who uses Linux with another OS find any use out of such software.

Tristam Green
March 3rd, 2011, 04:29 PM
Photoshop. More intuitive to use than GIMP imo.

SeijiSensei
March 3rd, 2011, 04:30 PM
Microsoft Access

RiceMonster
March 3rd, 2011, 04:51 PM
Lots.

Windows, Visual Studio, foobar2000, MS Office, MS SQL Server, iTunes (for my iPhone). The list goes on.

slackthumbz
March 3rd, 2011, 04:52 PM
No.

EDIT: Ah, should have read the OP more carefully. I don't even dual boot. My phone runs maemo and all my laptops/desktops/servers run ubuntu or debian.

mihai.ile
March 3rd, 2011, 04:53 PM
Hello.
Just to clear things out, I am using linux 100% of the time (except office) in the past 7 years.

Despite great improvements I find that linux apps are almost perfect. The problem is that "almost".
And to not come here to talk about this and that just because I can, let me show you some concrete examples:

Gimp. I use it for years, it's a great piece of software, fantastic, but for a work I am doing right now I spend 10-20 minutes to process an image that would take no more than 5 minutes and with a better user experience in Photoshop. I don't argue, Gimp is free, Photoshop costs 1000$. But free or not Gimp is not perfect. (How is possible to ship a ubuntu version of Gimp where they did not remember to see if it can print images, a very basic thing) So yes, Photoshop is very useful and makes sense.

F-Spot. I never really managed to use this application, the idea behind it is great but there are so many "small issues" that are annoying and makes the overall experience a pain. So even in Ubuntu it was replaced by...

Shotwell. Well my girlfriend took less than 5min to discover that the app is useless: What kind of app does not allow backspace or have a back button when you browse folders of images to return to the upper set of images!? Did they actually use it or only program it? Now compare that with apple software, iPhoto for example. It gives a great user experience, you just feel better only seing how good some features are thought in there.

Banshee. Rythmbox. etc. They are all really great apps (I actually hate that iTunes does not have .flac support) But if you come to forums from time to time, people asks "i am using ___ for music player, I need functionality ___" the answer is always "Use the ___ player, it does it" The problem is that is very difficult to find one good clean player that suits most of your needs.

Generally proprietary software is way better polished, and Apple took it to the extreme.

Although I would like open source to be more polished and well thought, proprietary software still makes sense and is useful even when 101 open source alternatives exist, it's not that one replaces another.

Grenage
March 3rd, 2011, 04:57 PM
Lots.

Windows, Visual Studio, foobar2000, MS Office, MS SQL Server, iTunes (for my iPhone). The list goes on.

Pretty much the same here. Work aside, I use Windows for gaming along, with other Windows applications.

Unless you're an OS zealot, or only e-mail and surf, you're likely using a lot of proprietary stuff.

Verbeck
March 3rd, 2011, 05:00 PM
edit: nvm

sudoer541
March 3rd, 2011, 05:02 PM
Here is my list of proprietary software:

Adobe Photoshop
Windows Media Player
Nero CD burning software
Acronis True Image
Windows Live messenger
Skype (Windows version)
Foxit PDF reader
And more

Frogs Hair
March 3rd, 2011, 05:08 PM
yes , I dual boot and use Windows for work and school. I really like may Sorax pdf software on Windows . I use nvidia drivers on both of my operating systems and also have some Windows games . I like Sysinternals applications also.

donkyhotay
March 3rd, 2011, 05:11 PM
I don't dual-boot but thats because I don't need to use any proprietary windows software. I probably would if there was something I really needed. For now I just use a virtual machine for when I *really* need windows but it's so rare (like maybe once a year at the most) that I usually don't have virtualbox installed and have to download/install it then download/install windows into it, then do what I need. When done I usually remove it again because I use it that infrequently.

Paqman
March 3rd, 2011, 05:14 PM
I understand Linux is about free software and open source.

Only if you want it to be. You can use proprietary software on Linux, just like you can use open source software on Windows.

LinuxFox
March 3rd, 2011, 05:20 PM
Only if you want it to be. You can use proprietary software on Linux, just like you can use open source software on Windows.Sorry I made a generalization. Now that I think about it, I actually have Open Office on my Windows partition.

mihai007: I agree actually, there's lots of open source software I like to use. I was just wondering if anyone who uses other OSes find any proprietary software useful, that's all.

TeoBigusGeekus
March 3rd, 2011, 05:37 PM
Civil 3D, Raster Design, Archicad, Artlantis, Fespa, ECM, HyperCode, Adobe Acrobat.

DouglasAWh
March 3rd, 2011, 05:48 PM
Unless you're an OS zealot, or only e-mail and surf, you're likely using a lot of proprietary stuff.

Can you define "a lot" and "using"? Are we counting going to the grocery store where they use proprietary software as "using"? Are we counting Google as "using".

Can we also define "you're"? Are we talking about the entire planet, because I'd feature to guess there's a fair number of the population that don't use any software. Are we talking about every computer user because then clearly that is a true statement as most people are Windows users.

If we are just talking about desktops and people on this forum, I'm going to have to disagree with this statement, mostly because of the "a lot" part.

Random_Dude
March 3rd, 2011, 05:48 PM
MS Office. It's probably the main thing keeping me from uninstalling Windows from my laptop .
That and the fear that somebody asks me something that can only run on Windows. It's always good to keep the most used OS in one of your PCs, nothing wrong with that. ;)

I also run closed-source stuff on Ubuntu, like Skype.

Cheers :cool:

Quadunit404
March 3rd, 2011, 07:27 PM
Opera, Steam, Windows, ESET Smart Security, Dropbox, Pinnacle Studio 14, Skype, FRAPS and the list goes on and on.

NightwishFan
March 3rd, 2011, 07:31 PM
The only proprietary software I ever find useful are: Nvidia Drivers, Skype, and Opera. I am not opposed to proprietary software being available. I just 9/10 times will use and support open alternatives.

Spice Weasel
March 3rd, 2011, 07:41 PM
Steam. I hate the bloody thing, but it's the only way to communicate with some friends.

false truths
March 3rd, 2011, 07:50 PM
The only proprietary software I use anymore is Skype and the Broadcom Wlan drivers. I used to use a lot of it, but when my Windows partition gave out on me, so did all my proprietary stuff. Fortunately, with a little toying, I've managed to replace every proprietary tool except Skype and my Wlan drivers with something open-source that works just as well (for me, at least).

As a direct response to the thread title, though, yes. Skype is very useful because it's the only form of communication I have sometimes. Also, having a working wireless card is always nice lol.

sydbat
March 3rd, 2011, 08:18 PM
Do you find any proprietary software useful?

Yes, plenty.

At this point in time, to make any OS work the way you want, there will inevitably be some software that is proprietary...unless you limit yourself and your choices and only believe that "free and open source" software can do it all.

Dragonbite
March 3rd, 2011, 08:24 PM
MS Visual Studio
MS Publisher (have a lot of files that aren't converted, and Scribus isn't as easy/intuitive)
MS Office (2010 at work is great!)
Adobe Acrobat (Evince and Okular don't have the same edit capabilities)
Google Picasa (it runs in both, but it's in Wine in Linux)
Google Sketchup
Turbo Tax (it's the time of the year again!)
MS Live Mail (it's actually pretty good, I've got 3 accounts working in it)
Skype
drivers for my Tablet (Wacom doesn't work, it's not a Wacom)
Broadcom wireless drivers

aaaantoine
March 3rd, 2011, 08:43 PM
I am surprised by the complete absence of Adobe Flash in repsonses up to this point.

The open-source counterparts don't do the same job that Flash does. And, even though emerging W3C standards will (hopefully) make Flash obsolete, it still fills a niche.

LinuxFox
March 3rd, 2011, 08:47 PM
I am surprised by the complete absence of Adobe Flash in repsonses up to this point.

The open-source counterparts don't do the same job that Flash does. And, even though emerging W3C standards will (hopefully) make Flash obsolete, it still fills a niche.I was thinking program-wise, like an application. I wasn't thinking plug-ins. Yes, I use Adobe Flash, on both my Windows and Linux partitions.

Dragonbite
March 3rd, 2011, 09:02 PM
I am surprised by the complete absence of Adobe Flash in repsonses up to this point.

The open-source counterparts don't do the same job that Flash does. And, even though emerging W3C standards will (hopefully) make Flash obsolete, it still fills a niche.

+1, I was thinking applications too.

I don't think HTML 5 will make Flash obsolete, but will reduce its reliance. There are going to be some programs (games?) which Flash will be able to do quicker/easier than HTML 5, plus Adobe isn't going to sit on their duff and watch Flash get marginalized.

Competition is good.

andymorton
March 3rd, 2011, 09:05 PM
I don't dual boot but.....

1. Broadcom wireless drivers
2. Flash
3. SPSS
4. Spotify

YesWeCan
March 3rd, 2011, 09:10 PM
MS Windows 7, XP
MS Office
MS Flight Simulator 9
Oracle Java
NetBeans
Oracle Open Office
Oracle VirtualBox
Google Chrome
Google Earth
Skype
LTspice


Generally, I find the authors more important than whether something is open source or not. Quality varies a lot; generally software that comes from a commercial entity is better.
OpenVPN is excellent. K3b. VLC. Linux kernel. Thunderbird is ok.

Dragonbite
March 3rd, 2011, 09:19 PM
MS Windows 7, XP
MS Office
MS Flight Simulator 9
Oracle Java
NetBeans
Oracle Open Office
Oracle VirtualBox
Google Chrome
Google Earth
Skype
LTspice

Aren't a few of those (netbeans, openoffice and virtualbox) open source?

RiceMonster
March 3rd, 2011, 09:23 PM
Aren't a few of those (netbeans, openoffice and virtualbox) open source?

You could argue Virtualbox is proprietary I suppose, since there is a proprietary and an open source version. Definitely not so for the other two, however.

Paqman
March 3rd, 2011, 09:24 PM
Aren't a few of those (netbeans, openoffice and virtualbox) open source?

The version of Virtualbox you get from Oracle isn't, although there is an open source version available that's missing some features.

YesWeCan
March 3rd, 2011, 09:25 PM
Aren't a few of those (netbeans, openoffice and virtualbox) open source?
Not sure about NetBeans.
Oracle/Sun Java is not open source. VB has an open source version but I believe it has reduced functionality. Not sure about OpenOffice; presumably not or LibreOffice would be redundant.

Irihapeti
March 3rd, 2011, 09:27 PM
Office 2000 in Wine (don't use it much)
Adobe Reader (ditto)
Sun Java WTK (ditto)

Linuxant HSF dialup modem driver. I don't need it now, but if I hadn't had that, I'd never have got started with Ubuntu in the first place.

At the present time, I have a Windows install that I use to access an online course which uses Adobe Connect 8. Yes, it runs in Ubuntu - needs flash player - but the CPU gets devilish hot. I don't want the machine shutting down in the middle of a session!

Dragonbite
March 3rd, 2011, 09:29 PM
Didn't know about Virtualbox, but that makes me think of VMWare as another proprietary software that is useful.

Wow, talk about tripping over things.. I know I listed Adobe Acrobat, but that could change depending on how effective PdfMod (http://live.gnome.org/PdfMod) turns out to be!

YesWeCan
March 3rd, 2011, 09:30 PM
From the NetBeans site:

In June 2000, NetBeans was made open source by Sun Microsystems, which remained the project sponsor until January 2010 when Sun Microsystems became a subsidiary of Oracle. Please see our History section for more information.

I consider NetBeans to be EXCELLENT, probably because it was sponsored by Sun. I really hope it continues to be excellent now it has been cut loose from Oracle. Perhaps they have other sponsors now.

dh04000
March 3rd, 2011, 09:49 PM
Exact Audio Copy. Nothing touches its greatness.

Also skype, random games, ect.

Oh and Flash, Java, wireless drivers, ect.

clanky
March 3rd, 2011, 09:58 PM
While much of the arguments for / against open source alternatives are fairly subjective and while there are open source alternatives for most things even though some may not be exact drop in replacements, the one thing which is seriously lacking in the land of open source is a serious contender to AutoCAD.

GIMP may have it's flaws and some people may prefer Photoshop, but at least it is possible to do pretty much everything that you could need to do in GIMP, there is no open source CAD package which even comes close to any of the leading proprietary CAD packages out there.

Joeb454
March 3rd, 2011, 10:01 PM
On Windows I only really use the 2010 versions of Office & Visual Studio.

On OS X I use Mail, iTunes, Pages, Skype and Coda

TeoBigusGeekus
March 3rd, 2011, 10:04 PM
While much of the arguments for / against open source alternatives are fairly subjective and while there are open source alternatives for most things even though some may not be exact drop in replacements, the one thing which is seriously lacking in the land of open source is a serious contender to AutoCAD.

GIMP may have it's flaws and some people may prefer Photoshop, but at least it is possible to do pretty much everything that you could need to do in GIMP, there is no open source CAD package which even comes close to any of the leading proprietary CAD packages out there.

My words exactly! Wish I could upvote you kind sir.

JDShu
March 3rd, 2011, 10:29 PM
Dropbox is an amazing service.

Quadunit404
March 3rd, 2011, 11:22 PM
Just so you know, the closed and open source editions of VirtualBox have been merged and there is just one VirtualBox now, licensed under the GPL and with its source available, and then a proprietary extension pack licensed under the PUEL that gives VirtualBox the features omitted from the old OSE.

TriBlox6432
March 3rd, 2011, 11:25 PM
Note: I don't currently use any of these, as I run Ubuntu alone. However, I do like these apps more than any open source equivalent.


Microsoft Office
iTunes
Foxit Reader

And probably more

jerenept
March 4th, 2011, 12:10 AM
Opera. Definitely Opera. I seriously cannot live without Opera.

P.S. the NVIDIA binary drivers too.

handy
March 4th, 2011, 12:45 AM
Haven't used Windows for over 5 years.

I very rarely boot into OS X, where I use iTunes to back up my iPod Touch (the Contacts component is what it was bought & used for).

Also I use Sandvox, which is the easiest web site creation tool I could find (cheap too), nice people run it as opposed to the evil Adobe who now own my what was Macromedia's Studio MX 2004 - if you can't beat them buy them!

I used to play Guild Wars via Crossover on the Mac (as the graphics were better than under Linux), but I haven't for over a year now.

Really apart from the easy Contacts back up with iTunes I would never boot OS X. When my iPod dies I'll buy something that works with Linux & drop OS X, all together.

kaspar_silas
March 4th, 2011, 01:09 AM
Flash, Misc Video Codec stuff, NVIDIA drivers and [sigh] Mathematica.

_outlawed_
March 4th, 2011, 01:44 AM
Photoshop. More intuitive to use than GIMP imo.

Definitely. I don't like the GIMP windows all separate floating around into space, it's annoying.

rg4w
March 4th, 2011, 02:08 AM
Nvidia drivers
LiveCode IDE

Hmm...

I tried to think of a third one and came up empty.

Khakilang
March 4th, 2011, 03:55 AM
I only use Window for gaming. But I find Picasa very useful for photo viewing and editing and it works on Ubuntu Linux.

Evil-Ernie
March 4th, 2011, 04:37 AM
With my music work I find it hard to drag myself away from Cubase, yes there are good open source DAWs like Ardour but I am just so used to the Cubase way of doing things its intuitive.

Same with Virtual DJ, as much as I love Mixxx and I am still trying to use it more live, when it comes to mixing, looping and effects Virtual DJ is just fantastic and the best tool out there for live digital DJing. But I will persevere with Mixxx! :D

Everything else that I have used in Windows although useful I have found in Ubuntu applications that are better or at least on par with the proprietary equivalent.

Primefalcon
March 4th, 2011, 08:59 AM
Gmail, Skype, Google voice/chat and I guess Linux (it has proprietary blogs in the kernal so the kernal is partially proprietary lol)

and no I don't duel boot, Ubuntu only

murderslastcrow
March 4th, 2011, 10:49 AM
I'm in a special position as a programmer/multimedia designer, specializing in 3d graphics. I'm in an industry that has a lot of big guys fighting each other, along with Blender wiping the floor in some areas. There's a lot to explore.

I think a lot of proprietary software is perfectly useful, but I would rather have the open source equivalent because it reduces the incentive for companies to make anything but the very best software to compete.

We don't know how many commercial programs could have been inspired to reach a higher limit because of the powerful show of open source. There is very, very little you can't do on Linux, and a ton of stuff you can only do on Linux (and POSIX compliant OSes in general). It's a beautiful thing that everyone should take advantage of. I don't think anyone has to switch, but for most people I know, Windows is more of a legacy platform that they need for old programs than it is an evolving, new, awesome thing that they're excited about. In fact, usually I just hear people complain about the same old problems that aren't getting fixed.

And, I think it's inevitable as Microsoft's popularity decreases that they will have to redesign their OS. To be perfectly honest, if Windows became better than Linux (faster, more customizable, just as secure, easy to install new software, embraced open standards and technology) I would be extremely proud of our community for encouraging that change. And I think it may very well happen, and again I would have to say that much proprietary software can be plenty useful.

It's just that when there's an open alternative, it just makes sense that if you don't need a computer for anything compatibility/business related, you should choose responsibly, for the better of society. I think you should choose open if you can get away with it.

And for those people who keep Windows around just for games- thank you for not ditching Linux entirely. You're a great example of how we should feel free to mix our technology and have the best of both worlds. But for the people who stick to Windows just because it's familiar- make a move. If your computer use isn't tied to proprietary software through a career, embracing open standards is a liberating experience.

Zero2Nine
March 4th, 2011, 11:08 AM
Does proprietary means you have to pay for it or is all closed source software proprietary? I've used some closed source but nearly everything was free. With one major exception: Games! I wasn't using that many pay for software outside games (except the stuff shipped with Windows like media player in the browser). I liked Winamp, NotePad++, Foobar 2000 and Paint.NET.

Grenage
March 4th, 2011, 11:10 AM
Does proprietary means you have to pay for it or is all closed source software proprietary? I've used some closed source but nearly everything was free. With one major exception: Games! I wasn't using that many pay for software outside games (except the stuff shipped with Windows like media player in the browser). I liked Winamp, NotePad++, Foobar 2000 and Paint.NET.

Proprietary means that the source is closed.

Call_M
March 4th, 2011, 11:19 AM
I switched form osX to linux.

Untill now I miss:

Office (with Wine it is so-so and openoffice.org is the worst package supplied with the Ubuntu distro imho)

I think that is also THE reason why Linux is not yet nr. 1

Lucradia
March 4th, 2011, 11:31 AM
RPG Maker XP and newer, as the open source alternatives and/or free alternatives are more complicated. RPG Maker is more for people who don't want to code.


Office (with Wine it is so-so and openoffice.org is the worst package supplied with the Ubuntu distro imho)

I think that is also THE reason why Linux is not yet nr. 1

Any reason why openOffice is no good?

Call_M
March 4th, 2011, 01:29 PM
Any reason why openOffice is no good?

It is de only program that constantly hangs on my PC.

Tristam Green
March 4th, 2011, 02:16 PM
Can you define "a lot" and "using"? Are we counting going to the grocery store where they use proprietary software as "using"? Are we counting Google as "using".

Can we also define "you're"? Are we talking about the entire planet, because I'd feature to guess there's a fair number of the population that don't use any software. Are we talking about every computer user because then clearly that is a true statement as most people are Windows users.

If we are just talking about desktops and people on this forum, I'm going to have to disagree with this statement, mostly because of the "a lot" part.


ABCADABA@#(&DVNWEX2.

SEMAAAAAAAAANTICS.

Do you drive a car? You're using proprietary software.
Do you have a digital camera? You're using proprietary software.

Good lord, get into the semantics battle if you like, but that's dirty pool.

t0p
March 4th, 2011, 03:39 PM
I use flash and other stuff like that which is proprietary; but by and large most of the stuff is Free... because I use Ubuntu and the applications that come through the repositories.

But: I bought a HP Deskjet D2600 printer that was on deep discount. I did some online research beforehand and it looked like this printer would work with Ubuntu "out of the box". All nonsense, of course - Ubuntu can see the printer, and claims it can work with the printer... but will it do any actual printing? Hah! No it will not.

So, I use the proprietary version of VirtualBox and a Microsoft XP .iso that I picked up somewhere, so I can use the printer. That's the only task I need VBox and XP for. But it doesn't matter to me anyway. I like the politics behind Free software, and it's nice to get software without having to pay for it; but I'm not a FOSS "zealot" (gosh, that's a loaded expression - I hope no one is offended by that).

I've nothing against proprietary software per se. But I do think Free software is better - not because of functionality, nor appearance (Free apps are often ugly to the max) - but because it gives me a warm, fluffy feeling. Like "sponsoring" a tiger that's probably been hunted down and converted into "medicinal" products.

Lucradia
March 4th, 2011, 04:07 PM
It is de only program that constantly hangs on my PC.

Then you'll want to hate Java.

MisterGaribaldi
March 4th, 2011, 04:20 PM
Well, yeah, actually I do. It's what prevents me from running Linux full-time. However, it's also a mix because it's not something that ties me exclusively to Windows or Mac OS X, either. But, basically:



Word (better formatting and styling tools, better citation tools, guaranteed file compatibility)
Excel (LO Calc is ok, but Excel has always been smoother)
PowerPoint (Sorry, but LO Impress just isn't quite there, and again, compatibility is an issue)
OneNote (Great note-taking software, haven't found equivalent in either Linux or Mac OS X)
Photoshop (Gimp is nowhere close to it, in terms of the feature set -- which is most important -- or an intuitive GUI)
Games ('nuff said)
GarageBand (neither Microsoft nor F/OSS has anything anywhere close)
Other Misc. Graphics and Multimedia stuff (ComicLife Deluxe, AudioHijack, etc.)

Lucradia
March 4th, 2011, 06:36 PM
Photoshop (Gimp is nowhere close to it, in terms of the feature set -- which is most important -- or an intuitive GUI)


1. The GIMP's GUI currently is based off of Photoshop 4. The next version will have an option to have all portions of the GUI embedded into the overall window.)

2. The GIMP only needs two things to make you change your mind about it being "No where near" Photoshop: Full GEGL, and Layer effects.

That's it.

DZ*
March 4th, 2011, 10:09 PM
I use MS Word (2010 Professional) for which alone I keep the whole W7. I do not actually like it more than OO but people keep sending me docs with the "track changes" on. My experience with Word has been horrible. First, I couldn't install it with wine as the install would quit midway (I guess I'd be asking too much for it to work). One day, I started having random Word crashes under W7. It would just say "Microsoft Word has stopped working" and quit. Naturally, first I blamed the people who're sending me docs on which it would crash :-) Then I found an elaborate solution on support.microsoft.com that instructed me to try a sequence of different things, from package "repair" to deleting registry entries, deleting normal.dot, and disabling add-ins. Nothing worked. Then in a moment of lucidity I recalled that I had added a second printer a while ago. Disabling it is what stopped Word from crashing.

If that is not a showstopper experience I don't know what is. More generally, I try to stay away from MS or Apple because I'm plain lazy. I like to get all my stuff from official repositories and although I could pay money for software, the thought of entering a credit card number from an OS that has to run a virus-catching software (a game you cannot win by definition) just makes me feel uncomfortable.

MisterGaribaldi
March 4th, 2011, 11:12 PM
1. The GIMP's GUI currently is based off of Photoshop 4. The next version will have an option to have all portions of the GUI embedded into the overall window.)
You're kidding, right? How in the world does this:

http://ubuntu.allmyapps.com/data/g/i/gimp-gimp-image-editor/UBUNTU-8.04/Gimp_screenshot.png

Look anything like this:

http://www.emxource.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Various-tutorials-for-Photoshop-CS4.jpg


2. The GIMP only needs two things to make you change your mind about it being "No where near" Photoshop: Full GEGL, and Layer effects.

That's it.
And this invalidates my argument how?

sandyd
March 4th, 2011, 11:23 PM
The only proprietary software I use anymore is Skype and the Broadcom Wlan drivers. I used to use a lot of it, but when my Windows partition gave out on me, so did all my proprietary stuff. Fortunately, with a little toying, I've managed to replace every proprietary tool except Skype and my Wlan drivers with something open-source that works just as well (for me, at least).

As a direct response to the thread title, though, yes. Skype is very useful because it's the only form of communication I have sometimes. Also, having a working wireless card is always nice lol.
you shouldn't have to (depending on your wireless card) use the propreity drivers anymore soon. http://www.h-online.com/open/news/item/Broadcom-releases-open-source-wireless-driver-for-Linux-1076567.html

LinuxFox
March 4th, 2011, 11:47 PM
And for those people who keep Windows around just for games- thank you for not ditching Linux entirely. You're a great example of how we should feel free to mix our technology and have the best of both worlds. But for the people who stick to Windows just because it's familiar- make a move. If your computer use isn't tied to proprietary software through a career, embracing open standards is a liberating experience.You're welcome, I don't play too many games on my laptop, but I do enjoy using Linux since 2008. My now broken desktop was my gaming PC, even then I had a Wubi install on it just to use Ubuntu.

I mainly use Windows for a few games, Windows Media Player, a map program, and my iPod, all of which are proprietary. Most of the time I boot into Ubuntu. :)

TeoBigusGeekus
March 4th, 2011, 11:53 PM
Come to think of it (see earlier post (http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=10516853&postcount=14)), if useful==earns money, I only find proprietary software useful.

pi3.1415926535...
March 5th, 2011, 12:40 AM
Proprietary Software I use:
Chrome (Primary web browser)
iTunes (Running under WINE)
Adobe Reader (Allows searching)
and probably many other things, including web based apps such as Google Apps.

doorknob60
March 5th, 2011, 12:43 AM
Sure. Nvidia/ATI Proprietary drivers, Skype, Teamspeak, Flash (as annoying as it can be, it's useful), Steam/other commercial games, the list goes on. I use what works best for me :) I like using free software, but if there's something proprietary that works better, I'll use it.

Jose Catre-Vandis
March 5th, 2011, 01:02 AM
All the non-free software as mentioned by doorknob60 above is a great addition to my daily efforts.

At work though, Adobe Acrobat has a special place in my heart, for pdf creation and manipulation I have found no better.

beetleman64
March 5th, 2011, 01:26 AM
I generally use open source where possible, but I won't baulk at using proprietary software. Flash Player and Acrobat Reader spring to mind, and my printer driver is proprietary, and I occasionally use Avast! Antivirus and Google Chrome which are both proprietary (although I'm still a Firefox fan). So I generally use propietary software when I can't use open source software, probably like many people.

ubuntu-freak
March 5th, 2011, 01:56 AM
Yes I do.

Cracklepop
March 5th, 2011, 03:30 AM
Adobe Reader (Allows searching)

? The default Ubuntu pdf viewer has searching...
Edit > Find --or put it on the toolbar like I do

I wouldn't use the giant piece of bloatware that is Adobe Reader if I was paid to...
I use a lot of proprietary stuff though, as long as it's free($)

BigCityCat
March 5th, 2011, 03:50 AM
Citrix is very useful.So is my nvidia driver and my broadcom driver.

uRock
March 5th, 2011, 03:57 AM
? The default Ubuntu pdf viewer has searching...
Edit > Find --or put it on the toolbar like I do

I wouldn't use the giant piece of bloatware that is Adobe Reader if I was paid to...
I use a lot of proprietary stuff though, as long as it's free($)
What version of Flash do you use?

Cisco, Nintendo, Sony, VW, MS, Fluendo, Casio, Asus, Juniper, Adobe, Kenwood, Omron, Sharp, and even my wife's sewing machine has built in proprietary software.

Cracklepop
March 5th, 2011, 04:10 AM
What version of Flash do you use?

Cisco, Nintendo, Sony, VW, MS, Fluendo, Casio, Asus, Juniper, Adobe, Kenwood, Omron, Sharp, and even my wife's sewing machine has built in proprietary software.

Adobe Flash Square 10.2.3 64 bit.

Why do you want to know? Not following your post at all, to be honest...

uRock
March 5th, 2011, 04:19 AM
Adobe Flash Square 10.2.3 64 bit.

Why do you want to know? Not following your post at all, to be honest...

You are still using an Adobe product. If Adobe offered a free download that would install Adobe Reader, then I would use it in a heart beat.

Cracklepop
March 5th, 2011, 04:30 AM
You are still using an Adobe product. If Adobe offered a free download that would install Adobe Reader, then I would use it in a heart beat.

Yes, I certainly am.

Not sure what your point here is, or previously was.

My point was, if you want to discuss it, that Adobe Reader is bloated, and I wouldn't use it when there are lighter alternatives available (that also include search, for the benefit of the other member I quoted).

I'm struggling to see any relationship between what you're writing and what I wrote.

uRock
March 5th, 2011, 04:33 AM
I'm struggling to see any relationship between what you're writing and what I wrote.

You have such a strong opinion against Adobe, yet you still use their products. I find that amusing.

Cracklepop
March 5th, 2011, 04:38 AM
You have such a strong opinion against Adobe, yet you still use their products. I find that amusing.

Er, no, I have no strong opinion against Adobe at all. Don't know where you got that idea.

I have a strong opinion against one particular product: Adobe Reader.

Cracklepop
March 5th, 2011, 04:50 AM
... If Adobe offered a free download that would install Adobe Reader, then I would use it in a heart beat.

http://get.adobe.com/reader/

Enjoy. It's at least 10 times larger than a PDF reader needs to be though.

jerenept
March 5th, 2011, 05:04 AM
http://get.adobe.com/reader/

Enjoy. It's at least 10 times larger than a PDF reader needs to be though.

this is easier: apt://acroread

i.e. it's in the Ubuntu partner repo.

uRock
March 5th, 2011, 05:07 AM
this is easier: apt://acroread

i.e. it's in the Ubuntu partner repo.
See, don't ask and thou shalt receive.:P
(Gotta love AppArmor. It blocks that link, but no worries I have it installed.)

Seriously though. I just like Adobe when it comes to PDFs.

Cracklepop
March 5th, 2011, 05:13 AM
this is easier: apt://acroread

i.e. it's in the Ubuntu partner repo.

I know, but he asked specifically for a download from Adobe ;)
I'm so obliging...

MisterGaribaldi
March 5th, 2011, 07:42 AM
Well, for me, I wouldn't be able to function particularly well without Flash. myLabsPlus makes extensive use of it for doing online assignments, so it would become impossible for me to be a student without it.

Nkosi
March 5th, 2011, 11:40 AM
As others have mentioned, I use what works -- if it doesn't exist as opensource, proprietary's fine -- so Skype, Flash, Adobe Reader (yeah, why so big?). It'll be a landmark/watershed day when we really can do everything opensource.